Evo review. Short term.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Evo review. Short term.

    Bike set up:

    Weight: 36.5.lbs
    Med/large frame with DHX-air.
    Zoke Z1 light fork. 150mm of travel with ETA/RC2.
    Juicy 5 discs, 8" front and back
    Easton EA 50 handle bar, Race Face Diabolus 70mm stem. Odi lock on grips.
    F.u.n.n. Head Banger headset
    Mavic D-521 wheelset, Formula front hub, xt rear. Kenda Nevegal 2.35 tires.
    Shimano Hone crankset. 22/32 bash, Specialized mag platform pedals. Shimano 545 clipless.
    XTR E-type front derailleur,
    Sram X-9 trigger shifters and X-9 medium cage rear derailleur.
    Sram PC 991 Chain
    XT 11-34 cassette.
    WTB post and seat.

    I have included some pics and have absolutely no idea what I am doing with a digi cam, so I hope these turned out half decent.

    This frame has been getting a fair bit of attention lately and after talking with the lads at Chumba, many times, I decided to go with the Evo for my next heavy duty trail rig. I am 5'10" and weigh around 220-230lbs with gear. I will start by saying, this is a very different bike from anything I have ever been on before. In terms of fit, looks, and function, the Evo is a very unique frame.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1152561895

    When I first recieved the frame, I thought I got the wrong size, because the center to center tt only measured 22". As the seat post is extended, the tt length effectively increases to the 23.5" tt length. The bike seemed very strange to me with the seat post extended. I felt like I was sitting on the back of the bike and my pedal stroke seemed to feel different. Apparently, these are common observations that first time Evo riders, tend to make. After a few rides, I have become much more comfortable on the bike. I actually like the seat tube design, as it allows the bike to feel much more comfortable when pointed downhill. When you lower the seat post, the seat tucks away in a better position than a conventional seat tube arrangement.

    First the good.

    My Evo's maiden voyage was on a trail that has a gradual up hill climb that varies from relatively smooth, to loose and rocky. At 36lbs, this is not the fastest climbing build, but still gets you to the top. The Evo exhibits very little pedal bob and is a capable climber for a 6" rig. There is a chainstay pivot on the rear end and the Evo gets good traction, when climbing over roots and loose rock. With a 150mm fork, the front end is a bit light and you will probably have to change your riding position, when the climbing gets steeper. The HA is quite slack on the Evo and is even slacker, I believe, than the published prototype numbers on the website. Forks with A2C heights around 520mm, will still give aggressive geometry on the Evo. Think Pike and Zoke AM 3.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1152561283
    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1152562082
    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1152562377

    Yes, the Evo climbs pretty well, but it absolutely shines, when riding back down. I was very impressed with the descending abilities of this bike. The trail that I rode has exposed rocky descents, twisty technical single track, and a few rock gardens on the way back down. The Evo is very agile and is the best cornering trail bike that I have been on yet. This is where the stiffness and frame geometry comes into play. Just a tiny bit of body english and the Evo responds instantly. This bike wants to go fast and makes quick work of gnarly rock gardens and roots. I love to flow the dh part of the trail and the Evo makes it pretty easy to do so. Having the Z1 light up front helped to smoot things out. This rig was very stable at speed and absorbs bumps of all sizes, very nicely. I hit a couple of rock drops on the trail, around 3ft high and the Evo sucked them up like a dh bike. The Evo feels very comfortable and intuitive going dh. On rougher trails, a dual ring chain guide would be a nice addition to the Evo. I was picking direct lines over the roughest parts of the trail and the chain was all over the place.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1152563172
    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1152563333
    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1152563728

    The Bad:

    I realize the frame design requires an e-type front derailleur, but these things cause a lot of problems. First, the e-type sits too high up and there is a lack of adjustability. If the derailleur is damaged, the crank arm has to come off. With a standard Front D, you can easily remove it and slide it up and down the seat tube, for quick adjustments. An e-type might make it interesting when a rider wants to put on a chain guide. The bb width is pretty wide and for those that are used to narrow bb widths, the Evo will feel different at first.

    The seat tube/tt adjustment might not be for everyone. It takes some getting used to and feels different from anything else I have tried. I do feel it is a very functional design.

    Rear tire clearance might be an issue for larger tires. There is adequate clearance for my 2.35 Nevegal.

    So far, my impressions of the Evo are very positive and I recommend this bike for the rider who wants a little more bike than their current rig can offer. The Evo is another viable option, in the ever expanding 6" trail bike category. Chumba has come up with a very innovative design that stands out from the rest, with very little compromise. I would like to thank the guys at Chumba for fielding all of my questions and being so helpful. These are the reasons why it is nice to buy from the smaller companies.

    I will post another report in a couple of months.
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    Last edited by ronny; 07-10-2006 at 05:00 PM.

  2. #2
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    sweet ride ronny, i heard you talked to ker about a ride, we are back in a couple weeks from our DH trip, i look forward to seeing the bike in person and getting a nice ride in!

    looks like prarieview/jewell, one of my favorites for sure...
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    sweet ride ronny, i heard you talked to ker about a ride, we are back in a couple weeks from our DH trip, i look forward to seeing the bike in person and getting a nice ride in!

    looks like prarieview/jewell, one of my favorites for sure...
    Thanks. The trail was Prairie view. I was talking to Kerry just a couple of minutes ago. The weather is turning sour and I wanted to hit up Station Flats or Powder Face tonight. With the hail storms we have been having lately, I won't be chancing it.

    Have fun on the trip and I will see you guys soon.

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  6. #6
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    Nice ride report, AWESOME trails and views you have there!!!!!
    Last edited by duke777; 07-10-2006 at 03:07 PM.
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  7. #7
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    A few more.

    What the hell.
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  8. #8
    CURB HUCK!!!!!!
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    great write-up, ronny
    there hasn't been a bad review of the evo yet
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    great write-up, ronny
    there hasn't been a bad review of the evo yet
    El Chingon didn't give the Evo a good review. This bike won't be for everyone. It takes time to get used to it. Speaking for myself, at least. I am still adjusting. Downhill, I find it very comfortable, but I am still adjusting to the feel of the bike, while riding the flats and climbing. The design works, but just feels different than anything else.

  10. #10
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    I saw a frame at one of my local shops. Looked good except for:

    Tire clearance in the chainstays didn't look so hot. Odd, because it looked great on the seat stays. What's your take on a max rear tire you could cram in there?

    And the teeny tiny bearing sizes. Nice and sealed, but they sure looked awfuly small. I'd rather have some larger diameter bearings on a frame with that kinda travel, meant for some rough abuse.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover
    I saw a frame at one of my local shops. Looked good except for:

    Tire clearance in the chainstays didn't look so hot. Odd, because it looked great on the seat stays. What's your take on a max rear tire you could cram in there?

    And the teeny tiny bearing sizes. Nice and sealed, but they sure looked awfuly small. I'd rather have some larger diameter bearings on a frame with that kinda travel, meant for some rough abuse.
    I am running a 2.35 Nevegal in the back, with decent clearance on either side. Tire clearance is one thing I forgot to mention. If you want to throw a true 2.5/2.6 in the back, it will be tight. I find the 2.35 Nevegals to be a large trail tire.

    The bearings really don't seem that small to me. Larger bearings do help with stiffness and durability. Time will tell, how well the bearings hold up.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    El Chingon didn't give the Evo a good review. This bike won't be for everyone. It takes time to get used to it. Speaking for myself, at least. I am still adjusting. Downhill, I find it very comfortable, but I am still adjusting to the feel of the bike, while riding the flats and climbing. The design works, but just feels different than anything else.
    With all respect to El Chingon, I don't think his review of the EVO was very good. He claimed that the EVO "climbed very well," but did not mention anything about pedaling efficiency, nor did he comment on descending capability and overall handling.

    He mentioned something about chaingrowth - which i find to be inaccurate as I did measure the chaingrowth on the frame I received, and it doesn't seem problematic at all or any worse than my other previously-owned high end frames.

    Also, he mentioned that the EVO wasn't laterally stiff - now I can't really take that comment seriously given my experiences with the bike. This is probably one of the stiffest frames I've been on in a while - and so far, other than El Chingon, everybody else seems to agree.

    Perhaps he just didn't spend enough time on it, usually it takes more than one ride, and you have to have the bike dialed in to give a fair assessment of it. I started building mine up, and I will post pics soon!

  13. #13
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    I had mine at the shop and asked about potential chain growth on the Evo. I stood back while a guy cycled the suspension, and there didn't seem to be any noticeable chain growth. EL C was talking about completely letting the air out of the shock and then cycling the suspension. The Evo has the HL pivot as well, which helps with chain growth.

    In all fairness to the stiffness statement; I can push on the back of my Evo and watch the frame flex a bit. With that said, I can use a bit of leverage with my 200lb+ body and watch just about any swing arm flex, to a certain degree.

    I have only been on a couple of rides so far and it feels pretty stiff. A bit of flex isn't the end of the world either.

    I wanted to try a different bike and the Evo fits the bill. Every design has a weakness or two. It is too early to tell what, if any real problems the Evo will have. So far, I find it performs very nicely.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    I had mine at the shop and asked about potential chain growth on the Evo. I stood back while a guy cycled the suspension, and there didn't seem to be any noticeable chain growth. EL C was talking about completely letting the air out of the shock and then cycling the suspension. The Evo has the HL pivot as well, which helps with chain growth.

    In all fairness to the stiffness statement; I can push on the back of my Evo and watch the frame flex a bit. With that said, I can use a bit of leverage with my 200lb+ body and watch just about any swing arm flex, to a certain degree.

    I have only been on a couple of rides so far and it feels pretty stiff. A bit of flex isn't the end of the world either.

    I wanted to try a different bike and the Evo fits the bill. Every design has a weakness or two. It is too early to tell what, if any real problems the Evo will have. So far, I find it performs very nicely.

    Ronny,

    With regards to the flex statement - I agree with you. From reading El Chingon's post - it sounded like he was making lateral flex on the EVO as an issue. I've spent some time on a six pack, moment, Nomad, etc., and I just don't think you can honestly say that the EVO is noticably more flexy than any of those bikes. Now there is such a thing as built in flex, which means that the frame is engineered to perform more like a track car (race cars have a certain amount of flex built into them), than a cargo truck. I wonder if El Chingon thinks that his frames shouldn't have any flex at all.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny

    The bearings really don't seem that small to me. Larger bearings do help with stiffness and durability. Time will tell, how well the bearings hold up.
    yeah, that was the main point i was thinking of. at least so long as they are a standard size, and easy to replace i guess it wouldn't be too bad.

    i'm not shopping for anything new, but this frame did catch my eye, for sure!

    but i think the small bearings and the limited tire size would be the deal breaker for me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover
    yeah, that was the main point i was thinking of. at least so long as they are a standard size, and easy to replace i guess it wouldn't be too bad.

    i'm not shopping for anything new, but this frame did catch my eye, for sure!

    but i think the small bearings and the limited tire size would be the deal breaker for me.
    The bearings are not that much smaller than any other high-end brands...same with the tire clearance, that seems to fit 2.5 very comfortably...i doubt you would need to run a 2.6 for this bike in the rear....so i can't really see your reasons as making much sense..

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by spicymaguros
    The bearings are not that much smaller than any other high-end brands...same with the tire clearance, that seems to fit 2.5 very comfortably...i doubt you would need to run a 2.6 for this bike in the rear....so i can't really see your reasons as making much sense..

    i'm just saying the frame i looked at had kinda' weeny looking clearance. all i'm saying is these two things would cross the bike off the list *for me* at least. my all mountain bike is also my DH/riding the lift bike, and i like the option to run a larger tire for that.

    i run the fat tires i like now. if i can run the tires i like to, without running into clearance problems, why would i buy the frame? when i put the full DH tires on, i go up to a 2.6 2.7 size; the tires i'm running for that would in no way fit into the frame i saw in the shop. i think even some 2.4 and 2.5 tires would have trouble. one of my favourites is the panaracer fire fr 2.4, and i doubt it will fit in the chainstays very well; it's huge.

    i'm riding a fairly beefy single piv bike right now, and it's pretty stiff for my weight, with a huge set of bearings, with a nice and wide stiff bearing axle. would i even notice the difference between it and an EVO frame? who knows. seems like a no brainer on a frame like this nthough: why not go for as larger bearing, especially if it gives more stiffness, and better longevity?

    if you're building a frame intended for abuse, *why not* use large bearings, and give the option for large tires?
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover
    i'm just saying the frame i looked at had kinda' weeny looking clearance. all i'm saying is these two things would cross the bike off the list *for me* at least. my all mountain bike is also my DH/riding the lift bike, and i like the option to run a larger tire for that.

    i run the fat tires i like now. if i can run the tires i like to, without running into clearance problems, why would i buy the frame? when i put the full DH tires on, i go up to a 2.6 2.7 size; the tires i'm running for that would in no way fit into the frame i saw in the shop. i think even some 2.4 and 2.5 tires would have trouble. one of my favourites is the panaracer fire fr 2.4, and i doubt it will fit in the chainstays very well; it's huge.

    i'm riding a fairly beefy single piv bike right now, and it's pretty stiff for my weight, with a huge set of bearings, with a nice and wide stiff bearing axle. would i even notice the difference between it and an EVO frame? who knows. seems like a no brainer on a frame like this nthough: why not go for as larger bearing, especially if it gives more stiffness, and better longevity?

    if you're building a frame intended for abuse, *why not* use large bearings, and give the option for large tires?

    I've seen some dude put a 2.5 DH tire on the evo. The narrow part of chainstay is pretty....well narrow. You may need to mount the 2.5 tire with little or no air but where the tire spins there is quite a bit of room. The EVO may not be the bike for you. if you want put a 2.6 or larger tire on, I know it fit 2.5 for sure.

    As far as bearing goes it's pretty big for AM bikes IMHO(you should see the "bearings" on yeti 575, they are just couple of carbon stubs), it will never be as big as a single pivote bike for obvious reasons. Also as far I know it it's built for AM riding not quite as beefy as a FR rig even though there are people racing DH on it. I heard they will come out with a more DH/FR and 7 inch version for interbike this year.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    El Chingon didn't give the Evo a good review.
    dang it lol
    every review I've read so far has been good, I have to read "El Chingon" 's
    the bike does seem to be geared towards aggressive all mountain riding and a true size 2.5 is enough for that kind of riding
    now that 7inch model they're coming out with ... that'll be a nice dh/fr bike that can pedal
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by spicymaguros

    Now there is such a thing as built in flex, which means that the frame is engineered to perform more like a track car (race cars have a certain amount of flex built into them), than a cargo truck. I wonder if El Chingon thinks that his frames shouldn't have any flex at all.
    I've engineered lots of track cars and there is nothing positive to report from chassis flex. There is always a trade off between weight and stiffness, but undamped chassis flex is all bad. Stories of flexible chassis being good in the wet etc are a complete myth IMHO.
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  21. #21
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    El Chingon has a Turner 6 Pack. I ran both the Evo and the 6 Pack through the Linkage software and in a 32/20 gear combo, the 6 Pack has about 4 times as much chain growth.

    And the 6 Pack is fairly low in that department.
    "Don't criticize what you can't understand."

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    Quote Originally Posted by uktrailmonster
    I've engineered lots of track cars and there is nothing positive to report from chassis flex. There is always a trade off between weight and stiffness, but undamped chassis flex is all bad. Stories of flexible chassis being good in the wet etc are a complete myth IMHO.
    I don't know if there is such a thing as a chasis that doesn't flex at all - you can measure bending resistance and torsional stiffness - and of course, i was referring to the relative flexibility/stiffness of the EVO as opposed to the competition.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve from JH
    El Chingon has a Turner 6 Pack. I ran both the Evo and the 6 Pack through the Linkage software and in a 32/20 gear combo, the 6 Pack has about 4 times as much chain growth.

    And the 6 Pack is fairly low in that department.
    Thank you Steve. I knew that El Chingon's review was a bunch of hogwash.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spicymaguros
    I don't know if there is such a thing as a chasis that doesn't flex at all - you can measure bending resistance and torsional stiffness - and of course, i was referring to the relative flexibility/stiffness of the EVO as opposed to the competition.
    Of course there isn't. Nothing is infinitely stiff, but you certainly don't "design" track car chassis to flex any more than you can help it within the weight limits. Same goes for FS bikes. You should make the frame and linkages as stiff as you can for the target weight. It really is that simple. Compliance in hardtail rear triangles is a different story, where you may aim for a degree of flex at the rear axle in the vertical plane to make the ride more comfortable.

    As for the Evo, I have no idea how stiff it is compared to its competitors. I don't think the rocker arrangement looks particularly stiff, but I haven't seen it in real life or tested it, so I can't comment further. Reviews so far seem very positive, so it looks like it works. Time will tell if there are any reliability issues.
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by uktrailmonster
    Of course there isn't. Nothing is infinitely stiff, but you certainly don't "design" track car chassis to flex any more than you can help it within the weight limits. Same goes for FS bikes. You should make the frame and linkages as stiff as you can for the target weight. It really is that simple. Compliance in hardtail rear triangles is a different story, where you may aim for a degree of flex at the rear axle in the vertical plane to make the ride more comfortable.

    As for the Evo, I have no idea how stiff it is compared to its competitors. I don't think the rocker arrangement looks particularly stiff, but I haven't seen it in real life or tested it, so I can't comment further. Reviews so far seem very positive, so it looks like it works. Time will tell if there are any reliability issues.

    I just took the Evo on another run today. Lots of rock gardens, off camber roots, and small natural drops and hits. Oh yeah, the climb to get to the dh, was a long one. I came away impressed, once again. It is a romp on the dh. In the climbing department, compared to my 6-pack, with a very similar build, I would say the Evo is about the same. Probably, a little better on fire road climbs. The Six Pack is a very good climber imo. Both are HLs.


    I feel much more comfortable on the Evo on technical dh runs. It is easier to throw around and corners better. It feels pretty stiff. I can get some later flex when leaning into the bike from the side (when I am not on it). I can do this on many bikes though.

    As far as chain growth goes? This is unfounded imo. There is no appreciable chain growth on this bike.

    Duke 777 brings up a valid point regarding max tire size. The chain stay does narrow a fair bit, before opening up, giving the impression of a smaller opening, than there really is. I think a larger tire would fit in, if it is at a lower psi and then fully inflated. I don't think anything bigger than a 2.5 would fit, with any amount of real clearance. A 2.5 is plenty big anyways. Not an issue for me, as my Nevegal 2.35 in the back, is very burly and already bigger, or the same size, as certain tires with larger listed sizes. Case in point; High Roller 2.5 and the Moto Raptor 2.4. I have owned both and the Nevegal 2.35 is bigger than the Moto Raptor 2.4 and at least as big as the High Roller 2.5.

    I do have one small thing to nit pick about. I am finding that my right calf is rubbing sometimes on the rear seat stay. The seat stay flairs out quite a bit. I thought it was my rear cable housing at first, but I tucked it away and I am still rubbing my calf on the seat stay. Why does my left calf muscle not rub then? Muscle atrophy. My left calf is smaller than my right, because of muscle wasting after two knee surgeries. It could be because my pedal stroke is jacked.

    Cheers.

  26. #26
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    Glad you are liking your bike Ronny. Just because I didn't care for certain things about that bike, shouldn't keep you from enjoying the hell out of it. For instance, I don't really care for the VP Free. I loved the way the bike climbed, and descended, but the noisy pivots were the deal breaker. I sold mine within a year of owning it. Touch your EVO, love your EVO, but don't give up on it because one guy didn't share the same opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chingon
    Glad you are liking your bike Ronny. Just because I didn't care for certain things about that bike, shouldn't keep you from enjoying the hell out of it. For instance, I don't really care for the VP Free. I loved the way the bike climbed, and descended, but the noisy pivots were the deal breaker. I sold mine within a year of owning it. Touch your EVO, love your EVO, but don't give up on it because one guy didn't share the same opinion.
    El Chingon,

    Its not really that you didn't like the bike that concerns me, its more that you were relying on inaccurate facts that have subsequently been proven to be incorrect in making your judgment on the Evo.

    You complained about chain growth, but it appears that your bike has four times more chain growth than the Evo, according to Steve from JH. If that is the case, it sounds like you haven't really been able to fairly evaluate the Evo, and should probably not make such snap judgments imho.

  28. #28
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    Spicy, you obviously haven't been on these boards for very long. Steve from JH is always asserting his BS about a lot of things. I think perhaps you take someone's word as gospel too easily, when they flash their engineering degree around. Steve mentioned chain growth in one gear combo. What you need to do is grab an EVO, and put it in the 32f and gear # 2 in the rear, and you will see what I mean. This gear combo is especially relevant for the type of riding I do here in So. Utah. I use this gear for low speed pedal kicks all day long. Sounds like your the one who is making snap judgements, and I doubt you have even spent any time on the EVO. This is a forum of opinions, both negative and positive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chingon
    Spicy, you obviously haven't been on these boards for very long. Steve from JH is always asserting his BS about a lot of things. I think perhaps you take someone's word as gospel too easily, when they flash their engineering degree around. Steve mentioned chain growth in one gear combo. What you need to do is grab an EVO, and put it in the 32f and gear # 2 in the rear, and you will see what I mean. This gear combo is especially relevant for the type of riding I do here in So. Utah. I use this gear for low speed pedal kicks all day long. Sounds like your the one who is making snap judgements, and I doubt you have even spent any time on the EVO. This is a forum of opinions, both negative and positive.
    El Chingon,

    I've read many of Steve's posts - and honestly I think he contributes a lot more than the random comments you seem to be making. I haven't spent time on the EVO? Okay, I've only demo'ed it for 3 hours at San Juan, and took it home for one week as a personal demo where I rode almost everyday. Don't give me that bs about gear combo, we already measured the chain growth when I got my frame, your full of it.
    Last edited by spicymaguros; 07-12-2006 at 01:51 PM.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by spicymaguros
    El Chingon,

    I've read many of Steve's posts - and honestly I think he contributes a lot more than the random comments you seem to be making. I haven't spent time on the EVO? Okay, I've only demo'ed it for 3 hours at San Juan, and took it home for one week as a personal demo where I rode almost everyday. Don't give me that bs about gear combo, we already measured the chain growth when I got my frame, your full of ****.
    Like I said, his engineering degree has you hypnotized. Poor Steve needs to get out and ride more. Try riding some other highend bikes, so you have something to compare the EVO to.

  31. #31
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    Spice,

    Get over it, he didn't like the Evo regardless of the "chain growth."

    The flexy rear wheel is a concern. A friend of mine who demoed the bike noticed it in the ride before we pointed it out to him at the bottom of the trail. He said the rear end felt "strange." Other than that he thought the bike was ok.

    Winston

    PS - Hardtails feel plush on San Juan.
    "I hope your gravity droppers all seize up....BASTIDS." - Aquaholic

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  32. #32
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    Now you've gone and done it Winston! How dare you disagree with the mighty Spicy! Prepare to reap the whirlwind!

  33. #33

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    ..

    Quote Originally Posted by Winston
    Spice,

    Get over it, he didn't like the Evo regardless of the "chain growth."

    The flexy rear wheel is a concern. A friend of mine who demoed the bike noticed it in the ride before we pointed it out to him at the bottom of the trail. He said the rear end felt "strange." Other than that he thought the bike was ok.

    Winston

    PS - Hardtails feel plush on San Juan.
    Winston,

    You obviously weren't paying attention to what the conversations was about, and your adding to the confusion. What I'm complaining about is not that El Chingnon didn't give a good review, I'm concerned that his review was slanted and based on some very questionable assertions, some of which, are clearly false. So perhaps you should mind your own business if you have no idea what is going on.

  34. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chingon
    Like I said, his engineering degree has you hypnotized. Poor Steve needs to get out and ride more. Try riding some other highend bikes, so you have something to compare the EVO to.
    Dude, you really need to stop making such reckless statements. I guess a six pack, moment, and nomad don't count as high-end bikes?

  35. #35
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    Ronny I think you have the blue tank top and white shorts?

    In the picture comming down the trail look closely at your right foot as compared to your left foot. It appears to be duck footed.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    It appears to be duck footed.


    It helps him maintain quaction.
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Ronny I think you have the blue tank top and white shorts?

    In the picture comming down the trail look closely at your right foot as compared to your left foot. It appears to be duck footed.
    Not me. I am the guy in the blue tank top, with grey and black shorts. The pic of me, is more from the side, than a frontal shot.

  38. #38
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    No problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by El Chingon
    Glad you are liking your bike Ronny. Just because I didn't care for certain things about that bike, shouldn't keep you from enjoying the hell out of it. For instance, I don't really care for the VP Free. I loved the way the bike climbed, and descended, but the noisy pivots were the deal breaker. I sold mine within a year of owning it. Touch your EVO, love your EVO, but don't give up on it because one guy didn't share the same opinion.
    As I stated before, this bike will probably not be for everyone. It feels quite different than anything else that I have tried and takes some getting used to. I feel very comfortable descending on the Evo, but I am still getting used to the way the bike feels overall. HL bikes almost always have a certain degree of flex, because of the extra pivots. It feels pretty sturdy though.

    If you don't like it, you don't like it. I am not going to get into a flame fest over this bike. No bike is perfect.I still have more riding to do before I make a final decision about it. So far, so good.

  39. #39
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    Thanks Ronny, I just now found your review, funny because I just got back from a visit to Chumba as well.

    If you were going to recommend a 6" trailbike with love for the DH and minor trail drops, would you recommend the EVO over the RFX?

    Just wondering, I have a 06 RFX not the HL version, I still havent done any major rides with it but I do have some time on the older Horst link 6 Packs. I like the fit of the Turner RFX frames, I would like to through a leg over the EVO, Im gonna have to hook up on one of Chumbas weekly rides I guess.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by drumstix
    Thanks Ronny, I just now found your review, funny because I just got back from a visit to Chumba as well.

    If you were going to recommend a 6" trailbike with love for the DH and minor trail drops, would you recommend the EVO over the RFX?

    Just wondering, I have a 06 RFX not the HL version, I still havent done any major rides with it but I do have some time on the older Horst link 6 Packs. I like the fit of the Turner RFX frames, I would like to through a leg over the EVO, Im gonna have to hook up on one of Chumbas weekly rides I guess.
    I would get some good rides in on the RFX, before you make any decisions. I really liked the Pack and it is a VERY capable bike. Up or down. The only thing I didn't like about the Pack, is that it felt like I was sitting up high and not like I was "in" or part of the bike. I want a bike that gives me that big bmx feel, while still being capable on very rough, technical dh terrain. This is the main reason that I like the Heckler so much, regardless of the sp design.

    The Evo is still relatively unproven, but I do feel more comfortable on it for descending and on tighter single track going down. It feels more balanced and I also prefer the Evo in the cornering department. So yes, I do recommend it over the RFX in this regard. Which is surprising, because the Evo is getting such good reviews for being a great climber and I thought it was in the descending, where the Pack would edge out the Evo. For flat out freeriding, it would be hard to say. The Pack is proven and can take big hits. The Evo seems very burly and is not a light frame, so it should be capable of some decent sized hits. I haven't hit anything sizable yet on the Evo. For now, I have just been riding technical trails and it just soaks up the rock gardens and roots, without deflecting. I can see why, some riders might use the Evo as a mellow dh rig.

    In the climbing department, it is harder for me to pick a clear winner. It is a toss up here. I think the Evo might have the edge on smoother climbs. Both are good technical climbers. I have found that both bikes have light front ends with a 6" fork and some body english is needed to keep the front end down on steeper climbs. Not really surprising. I need more ride time and I still might not be able to pick a clear winner.

    Keep in mind, these are my personal observations and other riders might find the opposite to be true. Part of what I am finding with the Evo is because of comfort. I just feel more comfortable going downhill. I think that is what Chumba had in mind when they designed the bike. I feel that I am in a better riding positon while on the dh part of the trail.

    I am still experimenting with seat post height and saddle postition for climbing. This is the one area, that I still need to work out on my Evo. It climbs well, but I am trying to find that sweet spot/comfort zone.

    I hope this helps.

  41. #41
    CURB HUCK!!!!!!
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    the bike I see even less reviews of, well actually -- none, is the chumba vf1, it looks a bit similar to the evo but deffinetly different and 5" rear travel vs 6"
    for my type of riding and for that of other people I can imagine, 6" of travel would never get full use 5" maybe. Chumba should use its patented design on it too though(I still don't get what it is ??)
    Kona Coiler

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    is there a waterfall on prairieview/jewel pass somewhere? all the rest of the pics i can pick out where they were shot - i can't say i've ever seen that before.

    btw that's a cool looking bike - is that mostly for our trails around here? looks pretty beefy. certainly will be unique around calgary.

    cheers

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcolin
    is there a waterfall on prairieview/jewel pass somewhere? all the rest of the pics i can pick out where they were shot - i can't say i've ever seen that before.

    btw that's a cool looking bike - is that mostly for our trails around here? looks pretty beefy. certainly will be unique around calgary.

    cheers
    There is a waterfall on Prairie View. It is off the trail, to the right, as soon as you come down the second hill, after the foot bridge. (I think) There is actually a trail going to it. Just follow the creek and look to the right. The water fall was more impressive a week earlier. The dry weather is slowing the flow.

    I got the Evo as my do everything bike. I will be riding it on the Moose Mtn freeride trails and COP as well. If my shoulder and knee holds up, that is. It was very fun on the roots and rocks on Prairie View. I rode Prairie View a few days earlier on my rigid. I blew a tire and tube, resulting in a long walk back. It is fun to pick a very aggressive line on a bike like this and not worry about breaking stuff. I just rode Cox Hill and it was good times.

    It is set up pretty heavy right now at 36lbs. My headset alone, probably weighs close to one pound. The wheelset is also fairly heavy. The lightest I could get the build without seriously compromising in the durability department, would be around 32-33lbs.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    There is a waterfall on Prairie View. It is off the trail, to the right, as soon as you come down the second hill, after the foot bridge. (I think) There is actually a trail going to it. Just follow the creek and look to the right. The water fall was more impressive a week earlier. The dry weather is slowing the flow..
    That's really cool - I've never seen that before - I'll have to keep an eye out for it next time I ride it.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    I got the Evo as my do everything bike. I will be riding it on the Moose Mtn freeride trails and COP as well. If my shoulder and knee holds up, that is. It was very fun on the roots and rocks on Prairie View. I rode Prairie View a few days earlier on my rigid. I blew a tire and tube, resulting in a long walk back. It is fun to pick a very aggressive line on a bike like this and not worry about breaking stuff. I just rode Cox Hill and it was good times.
    RIGID - lol - good lord. The back side of prairie view destroys my hands on my well-equipped trail bike - rigid is suicide on that trail.

    Have fun with the bike - as long as that sucker climbs well I can see having loads of fun around here with it - it doesn't get much better for trail conditions this year!

    Cheers

  45. #45
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    Rigids are cool.

    Quote Originally Posted by xcolin
    That's really cool - I've never seen that before - I'll have to keep an eye out for it next time I ride it.


    RIGID - lol - good lord. The back side of prairie view destroys my hands on my well-equipped trail bike - rigid is suicide on that trail.

    Have fun with the bike - as long as that sucker climbs well I can see having loads of fun around here with it - it doesn't get much better for trail conditions this year!

    Cheers
    The group I was riding with said it was crazy to be on a rigid also. I cruised the rock garden in the pics on my beater rigid, while a few less experienced riders, chose to walk thier fullies down. Yeah, I am proud. It is a challenge and I would like to get a tough rigid ss eventually. I was a full suspension hold out and my first two mountain bikes were rigids. I was riding rigids and hardtails until only a few years ago.

  46. #46
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    Thanks Ronny, keep the reports coming when you see fit, and drop me a line when you post them. Thanks.

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