An EVO for ME, finally- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    An EVO for ME, finally

    I rode a couple of Chumbas last summer - an XCL and an EVO. I liked them both, but the EVO really suited my style. I have been waiting for the small/medium size to come out, and it did a while ago. So I sprung for one of the new flashy metallic orange frames.

    I am building it right now. I like to do build 'blogs' on the forums, and people seem to like them, so here goes. I will be moving most of the components from my Ellsworth Moment over to my EVO, so check back here for updates. Click on thumbnails below for larger images:


    These pics do not do the color justice. When it is done I will take some pics in the direct sun and see if I can capture the metallic coolness of the paint. Plus, I really admire the guys at Chumba for making a Horst link bike. I mean, look at what Turner did. Chumba came up with their own patent to go with the Horst link and call it FC2. I love rooting for small company underdogs.


    There is no doubt in my mind where the incredible steering precision of the EVO comes from. I am not big drop rider, but I like the feel created by these big gussets. The biggest impression the demo left me with was "point and shoot" steering. Point the EVO down a pile of rocks and it goes where you aim it. Of course the fork, wheels, tires, etc. affect that too, so my build kit will play to the EVO's strengths.


    Chumba avoids mounting things on the seat tube, because they found - though computer analysis and destructive testing - that it is a weak place to mount pivots. Which makes sense. When I think of the pics of broken frames I have seen, most of them break on the seat tube. Chumba also found that the sides of the tubes are less stressed than the top and bottom, so check out how the shock mounts are welded towards the outside of the tubing.


    This the view from below the BB shell. The pivots are mounted as wide as possible, which is cool because it is an idea I had a long time ago, and if you agree with me you must have a great idea, right? Plus this is just a great view of CNC and welding you usually don't see.
    Last edited by DirtDad; 03-12-2007 at 12:24 PM.
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  2. #2
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    I think it would be cool for you to do a Moment/evo comparo. I'm thinking of making the switch and would like to hear what you have to say.

    Thanks.

    ps. the orange is awesome.

  3. #3
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    I kind of have already...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIMBERRR
    I think it would be cool for you to do a Moment/evo comparo. I'm thinking of making the switch and would like to hear what you have to say.
    I plan on it going into it in more detail, but I have kinda done a little comparison already based on the demo bike, that is why I am making the switch. The EVO feels way more confident on the downhills. The flex free front end and relaxed head angle just begged me to throw it down drops and rocky sections faster than I ever had before. The EVO has a much lower "drama quotient", which is a term I am borrowing from Motor Trend magazine. I never felt like I was going all that fast or pushing it all that hard, then I looked back up the trail and see I had dropped my buds on sections where they used to wait for me.

    It will be interesting to see how it goes with a frame that fits. The loaner EVO was too big. As it is, I would say the Moment was a better climber, the frame is a pound lighter and it responds nicely when I shift my weight forward and drop the adjustable travel fork. I hope an EVO that fits properly will climb as well. But I am not too worried about that. The loaner climbed nice, and I have been out on Scalpels, hardtails, and other race bikes, and they just do not make me a great climber, so I am saying the heck with it and getting a bike that plays to my strengths.
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  4. #4
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    I'm kind of thinking that the Moment might be a better climber, but what fun is that. We all know the best part of any ride is the DOWN. The faster the better. The rockier the more interesting.
    Look forward to another review once it's built up.

  5. #5
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    Its coming together...

    Here is progress so far. Pics are clickable:

    The build has XC and all mountain type parts on it. Moving used parts onto a new frame is not as nice as getting all new parts, of course, but it is a practical necessity. I need a new front derailleur and seatpost to fit the frame. Plus I discovered the rear cassette was just worn out. So there will be a few new parts. I am experimenting with the shock, this one does not fit - the stroke is too long. It would have made the bike 6.75" travel, but the frame bottoms on itself. Yikes. Chumba warned me. New generation XTR shifting is my favorite, but my older XTR crankset will keep me going, as much as I like the new M970 model, I just dont have the $$$. The Lyrik 2-step air is a great fork. It is the reason I am going with a frame like this and not a Chumba XCL. 6" travel bikes are getting to be just general purpose everyday bikes - it used to be they were all big hit, downhill, almost freeride class bikes.

    I have a set of matching Marta brakes on order. But they are ano red, I decided on the orange frame after ordering the brakes. I hope they look good together, I will see. Control Tech bar is a nice big bar, if not well known. King HS, of course. I expect I will want a longer stem, but I will wait until I can ride to be sure.
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  6. #6
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    Why are you thinking about getting away from the DHX A?

  7. #7
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    57 channels and nothing on

    Quote Originally Posted by TIMBERRR
    Why are you thinking about getting away from the DHX A?
    The DHX Air is awesome, but for all its adjustments, the one it lacks is the one I want most - Propedal on/off switch. It has the propedal adjust dial, but it is not something you want to change while riding, which I do all the time. I have Propedal off except for long climbs. The RP23 with the big can has the same air volume and linearity as a DHX A, so I am giving up all the compression adjustments and a half pound or so.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtDad
    The DHX Air is awesome, but for all its adjustments, the one it lacks is the one I want most - Propedal on/off switch. It has the propedal adjust dial, but it is not something you want to change while riding, which I do all the time. I have Propedal off except for long climbs. The RP23 with the big can has the same air volume and linearity as a DHX A, so I am giving up all the compression adjustments and a half pound or so.
    Good call...the RP23 is more practical than the DHX air, IMO, for trail/AM riding. The on/off switch is very effective and useful, much moreso than the PP dial on the DHX series. You're right, it's a lot like cable!

  9. #9
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    WOW the orange is VERY nice! Love to see the complete build.

    Can't wait for some action shots with that beautifully frame!
    Last edited by duke777; 03-13-2007 at 01:41 PM.
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  10. #10
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    It would have made the bike 6.75" travel, but the frame bottoms on itself. Yikes. ( end quote)

    I heard that the evo might get a little boost in travel. Any truth to this? CHUMBAevo mentioned it on another thread.

  11. #11
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    Update

    So here it is 95% done, ready to ride and tweek for a few rides. Click away:


    I am dying to get out and thrash this baby, Evos have the look of bikes that want you to ride hard, not baby them. The big bell cranks (that is what Chumba calls the rocker arms) really stand out as the centerpiece of this bike IMO, even with the gaudy orange paint job. You can kind of see the mirror finish on the seat stays.


    I tried a couple dozen photos to capture this paint job, this is the best I could do. The metallic effect only comes out in the direct sun, which is not the best photography lighting. But the finish is deep and complex. I figure it is for safety right? If I ever get lost I can just put the bike lying flat in an open field. Search parties, helicopters and orbiting satellites should be able to find it, no problem.


    A couple of noteworthy parts. I have come to really like this front tire. It is a Kenda Kinetics 2.6 with Kevlar bead and the soft Stick E rubber. It inspires gobs of confidence and it fills out the Lyric very nicely. Due to big, widely spaced knobs, rolling resistance is not the best, but it fits the priorities of the bike and build.


    I have been very happy with the wheels. They have the new Stans "flow" rims, which are 29mm wide, welded, and feature the arched box section they say adds strength. Together with Hope Pro II hubs, the make a light, strong AM wheelset. The front hub can be converted between QR and thru axle. Rear hub rolling resistance is a tiny bit higher than average due to having more/better seals than most hubs. Hopes are made in the UK where sealing out slop is important. Sealing is not so important in Southern California, but overall the hubs look like they are up there with King, Industry 9, etc so far.

    What next? A few details - matching brakes, a new sticker for the rear shock, suspension tuning, riding position, etc. And a few action pics and ride report.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtDad
    What next? ...a new sticker for the rear shock
    Push?

  13. #13
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    I am curious as to where your build came in at weight wise? Also, would a RS Pike be a good fit for that bike if it was used primarily for HD XC and AM type riding? I typically need a stronger frame due my size (6'2" 225 Lbs) I do not do big drops or hucks but like to aggressively ride rocky terrain. I have broken 6 frames over the last 8 years (1 Spec FSR, 4 Spec Enduros and 1 Ventana El Chamuco) so I have come to realize that I need a big beefy frame to handle my size and abuse. I am looking at an Evo as a future build but I have read that they are pretty heavy. My current ride is another El Chamuco w/a Pike 451 Air on it and I would move that fork over to the Evo. Is a med frame big enough for me?
    6'3" 33" inseam? Thanks! Really nice build BTW!!!

  14. #14
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    Build looks great.

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    I'll be curious to hear how the RP3 feels on the EVO. I've found it to be a very un-progressive shock that ramps up a bit too quickly for my taste so, on my Racer X, I'm running an X-Fusion PVA (better lockout, MUCH more progressive, MUCH harder to bottom out). It's 1/10th of a pound heavier than the RP3 (not that that matters for the EVO but it was a consideration for my weight-weenie race bike) but well worth it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CranxOC
    I'll be curious to hear how the RP3 feels on the EVO. I've found it to be a very un-progressive shock that ramps up a bit too quickly for my taste so, on my Racer X, I'm running an X-Fusion PVA (better lockout, MUCH more progressive, MUCH harder to bottom out). It's 1/10th of a pound heavier than the RP3 (not that that matters for the EVO but it was a consideration for my weight-weenie race bike) but well worth it.

    I think it's an RP23 not the RP3.

  17. #17
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    1st ride initial impressions

    Quote Originally Posted by CranxOC
    I'll be curious to hear how the RP3 feels on the EVO. I've found it to be a very un-progressive shock that ramps up a bit too quickly for my taste.
    Quote Originally Posted by TIMBERRR
    I think it's an RP23 not the RP3.
    More on that later...

    The EVO's maiden voyage was a Whiting Ranch/Santiago Truck Trail (STT)/ Luge loop, for locals how know those trails. I am very familiar with them, they make a good comparison ground for me. A full eval will follow later, this is a bunch of first impressions.

    I was prepared for the Evo to be a sluggish climber with all the reports of a wandering high front end on climbs, etc. So I built the bike to with a fork that could drop on the climbs, a non-setback Thomson post, seat slid forward on the rails, and a 120 mm stem. This put me in a more aggressive climbing position than I had on my Moment for comparison. Riding position more than anything makes a bike a better climber, IMO. And with that set up the Evo did out climb the Moment. I cleaned steep sections faster, with less fatigue and less stops. What that tells me is that the Evo is right in there with the current crop of 6" bikes when it comes to climbing capability, how well it climbs depends on how you set up the bike.

    I also did notice the different center of gravity that Chumba designed on this bike. Having the shock and linkages moved forward moves more weight under the rider and closer to the center of the bike, and it does make a difference you can feel. There is noticably less of a need to be sliding forward on climbs or hanging out over the back of the saddle on descents. I thought I might feel it more in cornering with a lower rotational moment (sorry , but I don't know what else to call it), but that did not jump out at me the way it did on the steep stuff.

    As for descending, the bike is solid but lets just say I need to play with the shock a little and eval descending later. The RP23 may just not be a good match for the Evo, maybe that is why Chumba specs the DHX Air (duh!). The good news is that the Evo can be set up to actually use all 6" of travel easily.

    More pics and ride reports to come...
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  18. #18
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    Just wondering how tall you are because you went to the smaller size. I read in a previous thread where you mentioned the Evo might be better in a smaller size for those who want a better climbing version, because the post is not positioned as far off the back as the med/large size.

  19. #19
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    Fit

    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    Just wondering how tall you are because you went to the smaller size. I read in a previous thread where you mentioned the Evo might be better in a smaller size for those who want a better climbing version, because the post is not positioned as far off the back as the med/large size.
    I am 5'9 and I like the Small/Med much better than the Med/large. They steepened the seat tube a little on newer frames to make the bike a better climber, and it looks good to me.

    To be more specific about my previous comment, if you run a really long seatpost in an EVO, the seat will end up farther behind the bottom bracket than on most frames. You can compensate with seatpost setback and seat position. I Beam seats and posts are very adjustable, the new Syntace P6 is even reversible between setback and non setback, and of course Thomson and Easton make non setback posts. Having set one up, I think those are the better options than looking to a smaller frame.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtDad
    I am 5'9 and I like the Small/Med much better than the Med/large. They steepened the seat tube a little on newer frames to make the bike a better climber, and it looks good to me.

    To be more specific about my previous comment, if you run a really long seatpost in an EVO, the seat will end up farther behind the bottom bracket than on most frames. You can compensate with seatpost setback and seat position. I Beam seats and posts are very adjustable, the new Syntace P6 is even reversible between setback and non setback, and of course Thomson and Easton make non setback posts. Having set one up, I think those are the better options than looking to a smaller frame.
    Btw, your Evo looks sweet.

    I am 5'10" with a med/large Evo. Overall I really like my Evo but the fit is a touch off and was wondering about the smaller size. If the seat tube was just a little steeper, it would make a difference for climbing. At my height (short legs) the standover height is more of an issue than the slack seat tube angle.

    Looking forward to another ride report. Later.

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    DirtDad your orange build is seriously HOT!!!!!!! I LOVE it!

    Wasn't for the uniqueness of my bike(only production EVO with no paint nor polished finish, prototype look ) I'd paint it Orange in a heart beat!

    WHERE ARE THE ACTION PHOTOS?????????
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by duke777
    DirtDad your orange build is seriously HOT!!!!!!! I LOVE it!

    Wasn't for the uniqueness of my bike(only production EVO with no paint nor polished finish, prototype look ) I'd paint it Orange in a heart beat!

    WHERE ARE THE ACTION PHOTOS?????????
    Are pics of your proto-look bike up somewhere? Share! Action photos and a more complete review are coming. I hate to stop riding it for pics though!
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtDad
    Are pics of your proto-look bike up somewhere? Share! Action photos and a more complete review are coming. I hate to stop riding it for pics though!
    Nope, I hate stopping to take pictures too. Takes for ever and I ride solo a lot! That's why I love other people's action shots hehe.......

    Hopefully you have a few good riding buddies to take pictures of you bombing down.
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    Nice!!!!!!!!!!!

    that build is awesome,as i said earlier when the 07s were posted ,the orange is just "CRIMINAL" Congratulations with the new rig.

    RIDEON!!!!!!!!!!!!

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