Dean Colonel. Question for owners.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    thecentralscrutinizer
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    Dean Colonel. Question for owners.

    Hello. I'm considering a Colonel for my next XC bike. After reading the "Show me your Deans" thread I wanted to ask questions about the bike. I saw mention that some spoke of front triangle flex and wasn't real sure if the were talking about the Colonel, or the xlite Colonel.
    Question.
    Do you feel your bike has too much flex? If so, is it front or rear flex?

    Thanks.
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  2. #2
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    I have a 96 Colonel. I dont know if they are made exactly the same, but I dont notice any real flexing. Its a great bike . Harry

  3. #3
    Why so uptite?
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    i rode a Dean Colonel for several years in the late 90's. It was not a flexy bike but that may be related to size. i rode a small. The bigger frames might be different. It had a good ride quality and was stiff enough laterally for me, Yet compliant enough to take some of the edge off.

    One other thing to think about, coming from a Kona Primo you may not like the slightly slacker headtube angle of the Dean. The Kona has become slacker over the years, but i prefered the more aggressive of the older Kona geometry. That was the sole reason i got rid of my dean. Depending on how you plan to set it up that may not make a difference to you, but thought i would throw it out there for you as a heads up.

    If you are planning on getting one for the 2008 race season, you should probably put your order in soon. You might be too late to get one for this season (2007) as from what i have read they are very difficult to get bikes from in a timely fashion.
    Last edited by EBG 18T; 03-09-2007 at 05:09 PM.
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  4. #4
    thecentralscrutinizer
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    Thanks for the replies. I appreciate the input and opinions. The angles may be concern since I just love the way my Kona handles. I'm still on the fence about the whole thing really.

    From what I've heard about dean, If I plan on having this for the upcoming race season it should have been ordered around Thanksgiving.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mopartodd
    Hello. I'm considering a Colonel for my next XC bike. After reading the "Show me your Deans" thread I wanted to ask questions about the bike. I saw mention that some spoke of front triangle flex and wasn't real sure if the were talking about the Colonel, or the xlite Colonel.
    Question.
    Do you feel your bike has too much flex? If so, is it front or rear flex?

    Thanks.
    John's pretty easy to work with. If you let him know how much you weigh and how you want the bike to ride, he'll build accordingly. You won't incur any "custom" costs until you start messing with the stock design (angles, dropouts, graphics, etc...)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by EBG 18T
    One other thing to think about, coming from a Kona Primo you may not like the slightly slacker headtube angle of the Dean. The Kona has become slacker over the years, but i prefered the more aggressive of the older Kona geometry (older HT angle was 69 deg vs the current 70 deg) than i did the Dean which is 71deg. That was the sole reason i got rid of my dean. Depending on how you plan to set it up that may not make a difference to you, but thought i would throw it out there for you as a heads up.
    FYI, the lower the number, the "slacker" the geometry (big handles slower, wallows on climbs, but is more stable on fast descents). The higher the number, the "steeper" the geometry (bike handles faster, minimal input rewuired to change directions on climbs, more nervous on descents).

    Good advice otherwise.

  7. #7
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    I don't know if this will really affect you, but I've got a Dean Colonel 29r with an EBB. It's a size XL and I don't notice any undue flex in the frame. Granted it's not an ultralite Aluminum XC racer, but I run it SS and crank and grind up a lot of climbs where you would be very apt to see flex and I don't really notice any excessive flex.

    Give John a call, he's really easy to work with and like others have said tell him your concerns and your weight and size information and they can fine tune the ride and frame stiffness with tube diameters and thicknesses pretty easily, without a custom fee. For example I've got a El Diente roadbike from them and I wanted extra BB stiffness, at the cost of ride comfort and frame weight and they certainly delivered. 1.75" downtube and 1" chainstays = very stiff and efficient BB. I didn't go that big on my Colonel with the tubes because I wanted a little more frame compliance for a rigid SS mountain bike.

  8. #8
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    I've had a Colonel for five years now. I don't think the front triangle is flexy at all. It's always felt pretty stout to me. I have read that the carbon/ti mixed front triangles can be pretty skittish.

    Is custom geometry an upcharge now? When I got mine, the custom option was free (except for the 4 month wait). I wouldn't worry about the handling, they should be able to build you what you want.

  9. #9
    Why so uptite?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natextr
    FYI, the lower the number, the "slacker" the geometry (big handles slower, wallows on climbs, but is more stable on fast descents). The higher the number, the "steeper" the geometry (bike handles faster, minimal input rewuired to change directions on climbs, more nervous on descents).

    Good advice otherwise.
    I f'd the numbers up in my post. Thanks for catching that.
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