Custom Voodoo Bizango Hard Tail- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Custom Voodoo Bizango Hard Tail

    Now that I'm all done with the bike, and finally got to get it muddy this weekend - I thought I'd share. But first you must suffer through a short history:

    I grew up in Marin County, CA and bought one of the first commercial Fisher Montares from the one dealer (at the time) in San Rafael. I rode that bike everywhere on and around Mt. Tam, and then used it to commute to college. Then I moved to the flat lands of the Sacramento Valley. I slapped on some slicks and the Fisher became my street mule, pulling a child trailer all over town. I still ride that bike every day, and for the past 21 years have put about $200 total in maintenance into it. Still has the above-bar friction shifters and original XT running gear that came from the factory. Fast-forward to last summer when I vacationed up in Bend Oregon. I went for a ride with some awesome riders who humiliated me on (me on an ancient borrowed bike and wearing street clothes/shoes, and NOT in shape for off-road riding... and certainly not at altitude!). I had so much fun that I thought I'd better get back into MTBing. I shopped and shopped and found all kinds of bikes "close enough" and finally decided to just build one the way I wanted. Thus the Voodoo was born. I finished it last Wednesday, and rode it for the first time this past weekend - back in Marin. The circle is complete.








    Voodoo page with all the boring details and more pics: https://darelldd.com/darell/voodoo.htm

    Thanks for this great forum, folks. It really was a big help as I was shopping around finding those final pieces to put this guy together.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  2. #2
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    Sweet! Now how the hell do you MTB when you live in Davis? :P

  3. #3
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    Yeah well...

    So far I stick it on top of my EV, and drive to Marin.



    I tend to end up lots of places that are good for riding. Bummer that I can't just wheel out my driveway onto Mt. Tam any longer though.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  4. #4

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    Very nice, it looks just like a Bizango frame I tried to bid on on ebay about a month back. I was all ready to snipe it and just then, my internet went down. Damn...How does it ride?

    I ended up with a Kelly so I'm not as bummed as I was but I always liked the Bizango, especially one with disc mounts (something my Kelly lacks). I too am getting my last few needed parts but my ride will be a 1x7.

    Could not help but notice your electric ride too, how do you like that?
    That trail you are on looks like a dream, you Cali folk are sooooo lucky!!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladies Man
    Very nice, it looks just like a Bizango frame I tried to bid on on ebay about a month back. I was all ready to snipe it and just then, my internet went down. Damn...How does it ride?
    Well this isn't from Ebay, so don't blame me! It rides like it should. I love the steel, and glad I decided to suffer the extra weight over the Bokor.

    but my ride will be a 1x7.
    This might end up as a 1x9... but I sure used the hell out of my granny gear the other day!

    Could not help but notice your electric ride too, how do you like that?
    That trail you are on looks like a dream, you Cali folk are sooooo lucky!!
    Link to my EV page is in my signature. Just click on it and you'll find out more about EVs than you ever wanted to!
    -= Darell The EVnut

  6. #6
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    Outstanding!!
    It's good to see some older bikes that still run great. Especially when upgraded to new spec parts. Those steel frames will last forever!! Just use Framesaver on (in) it to preserve the insides.
    Here's mine
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Without love in a dream it will never come true

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmtbkr
    Outstanding!!
    It's good to see some older bikes that still run great. Especially when upgraded to new spec parts. Those steel frames will last forever!! Just use Framesaver on (in) it to preserve the insides.
    Here's mine
    Hey... who you calling "older?" That's a 2007 Bizango frame, sir. Brand-spanking new from the factory.

    I did the linseed oil job on mine. No worries.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  8. #8

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    So is it custom in the Crazy Fred sense of the word, or you just hand selected the parts for it?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by darelldd
    Hey... who you calling "older?" That's a 2007 Bizango frame, sir. Brand-spanking new from the factory.

    I did the linseed oil job on mine. No worries.

    That is one LOVELY bike, I have one as well..

  10. #10

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    darelldd, linseed oil?? I never knew it could be used to protect metal, how did you apply it so that ALL the insides are coated? Also, who turned you onto this trick? Are you certain it works? Any info would be appreciated as my frame is still naked and I have plenty of linseed oil left over from a window project I did a couple of years ago.

  11. #11
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    What about the stock frame? Did it come already prepped from the factory? Am toying with the idea of using white lithium grease, would that work?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by darelldd
    Hey... who you calling "older?" That's a 2007 Bizango frame, sir. Brand-spanking new from the factory.

    I did the linseed oil job on mine. No worries.
    My bad...I saw 'Bizango' and thought of the original mid '90's frames, still hand made by Joe Murray, like mine was (a '96 vesrion Wanga with 631 tubing).. Then I niticed the disc brake mounts on the rear and realized that it wasn't vintage. But it's still the same 853 tubing and geometry as the old, so it should ride as good!!
    Best of luck, it IS a sweet ride....you'll never notice the weight difference from the Bokor anyway.


    PS....I use Pledge spray
    Without love in a dream it will never come true

  13. #13
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    Linseed oil will work. It will break down over time, but its cheap enough to re-apply once a year. Just pour it in the tubes and swish it around, then drain the excess.
    I used Weiglie (sp?) Framesaver years ago and no problems after 11 years.

    PSS....I use Pledge to polish the paint
    Without love in a dream it will never come true

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    So is it custom in the Crazy Fred sense of the word, or you just hand selected the parts for it?
    No plasma torch was used in the build of this bike...

    It is custom in the sense that you can't walk into your LBS and order one. I didn't "just" hand select the parts. That was the biggest job though! 1.5 months to procure the parts, couple of hours to build. One super custom thing I did was mount the tires back-asswards first. Was confused as to what the little front/back arrows meant. I figured it was just the arrows pointing to the front/back of the bike.... and of course it means rotation relative to which end you mount them. Duh.

    As you can tell, I leaned quite a bit on this project!
    Last edited by darelldd; 11-13-2006 at 06:53 PM.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladies Man
    darelldd, linseed oil?? I never knew it could be used to protect metal, how did you apply it so that ALL the insides are coated? Also, who turned you onto this trick? Are you certain it works? Any info would be appreciated as my frame is still naked and I have plenty of linseed oil left over from a window project I did a couple of years ago.
    The linseed oil trick was learned right here on these very boards. Turns out that "framesaver" is basically linseed oil with a propellant. I applied it with a pump yard sprayer - basically filling all tubes, and then twisted and turned it for several hours, adding more oil as the first batch drained out. After it dries, the coating is permanent as far as water penetration is concerned. I have NO question that I got all the insides. Used about 1/2 gallon of oil! Yes, I'm also certain it'll work as others have been doing this for more years than I've been riding
    -= Darell The EVnut

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmtbkr
    Linseed oil will work. It will break down over time, but its cheap enough to re-apply once a year. Just pour it in the tubes and swish it around, then drain the excess.
    I used Weiglie (sp?) Framesaver years ago and no problems after 11 years.

    PSS....I use Pledge to polish the paint
    Bit confused. You say that linseed will break down, while Framesaver won't? As far as I can tell, they're the same thing. I've used linseed oil for many other projects in the past and am quite confident that it'll last for the life of the bike. Heck, it lasts more than a year when exposed to the elements. The worst this will see, is a trickle of muddy water now and again. And then I consider that my last steel frame was never treated with anything and is still in fine shape 21 years later. I'm not worried, and already consider the linseed oil overkill.

    I use automotive polish on the bike, though Pledge works well for a quick wipe down to get the bug guts off and suck. I leaned that trick on my dual-sport motorycle many years ago. Thanks for the reminder.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmtbkr
    My bad...I saw 'Bizango' and thought of the original mid '90's frames, still hand made by Joe Murray
    The new frames come with a sticker that says "designed by Joe Murray." In theory they're the same geometry, but obviously no longer made by him! It is a neat looking frame. Only wish it came in something other than orange... but what the hell. I can't lose it!
    -= Darell The EVnut

  18. #18
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    man both of the bikes look really nice
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmtbkr
    My bad...I saw 'Bizango' and thought of the original mid '90's frames, still hand made by Joe Murray, like mine was (a '96 vesrion Wanga with 631 tubing).. Then I niticed the disc brake mounts on the rear and realized that it wasn't vintage. But it's still the same 853 tubing and geometry as the old, so it should ride as good!!
    Best of luck, it IS a sweet ride....you'll never notice the weight difference from the Bokor anyway.


    PS....I use Pledge spray
    I'm reasonably certain that none of the older Voodoo frames were "handmade" by Joe Murray. Murray was not a frame builder, he was a frame designer. A great designer, in my book, but he never wielded the torch on any of the Voodoo frames, so far as I know.

    FWIW, I had an original steel Voodoo Canzo that was handmade by Tom Teasdale (TET) but designed by Murray.
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  20. #20
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    Nice spec, and awesome color. And steel, too.

    Yummy.

  21. #21
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    So how's the ride? How does the comfort trump the Bokor or the Sobo?

    Great bike, by the way. I don't think I would have picked a single different part. Perfect, and 26 lbs. is more than respectable.

  22. #22
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    Thanks for the nice words folks!

    Quote Originally Posted by GrantB
    So how's the ride? How does the comfort trump the Bokor or the Sobo?
    I can only compare to the Bokor as I've not ridden a Sobo. There's no question that the Bizango is more... well... "steel." I hate to use the tired phrases, but can't help myself. The steele is simply less harsh. I don't miss the rear suspension hardly at all - except for a bit of chatter back there. But the little stuff just doesn't transmit like it does through aluminum. Great feel. I even like the way it sounds when plinked with trail debris. Not that I'd ever scratch it.

    Great bike, by the way. I don't think I would have picked a single different part. Perfect, and 26 lbs. is more than respectable.
    Nice to hear! Many hours were spent coming up with just the right price/weight/availability/durability aspects of each part. I could have bought a pre-made bike that was similar in many ways - but not just like this. And after swapping for the compenents that I really wanted, I'd be deeper into the hole than I am now, that's for certain! Too many bikes that are nice right up until they're just "OK" as far as the fork, brakes, etc. Didn't want the Juicy 3's or the F100 fork without all the adjustability. I'm hoping this will prove to have been the best choice for me. Was surely expensive, but also a great leaning experience. One way or the other the bike works great, and so far I love it.

    First maintenance order of biz is to take apart that Mavic rear hub which is dragging already.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  23. #23

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    Well, I gave the linseed oil a go at my Kelly Deluxe frame. Used a syringe. I should have blasted it with wd40 and let it dry out before I juiced it up with the linseed oil but I guess I got ahead of myself. Do any of you think that wd40 would be a bad thing now that the oil is already in? Also, how long do you let the frame sit before building up?
    Thanks all!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladies Man
    Well, I gave the linseed oil a go at my Kelly Deluxe frame. Used a syringe. I should have blasted it with wd40 and let it dry out before I juiced it up with the linseed oil but I guess I got ahead of myself. Do any of you think that wd40 would be a bad thing now that the oil is already in? Also, how long do you let the frame sit before building up?
    Thanks all!
    My best guess is that WD-40 might dissolve the linseed oil. No reason for the WD-40 AFTER the linseed oil, unless you're thinking that you missed some spots. WD-40 won't last long at all.

    Once the linseed hardens up, you can build away. Took a couple of days for me. Likely longer in cold weather. When the stuff stops dripping out, you're a day away. When you can stick your finger in the bottom bracket and not get it sticky, you're good to go.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  25. #25

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    That's a sweet looking bike. I looked at a Bokor years ago when you could buy complete bikes in the United Sates. It's my understanding that only frames are available. Voodoo's website is cool as well. Good luck!!!

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    wow... i love your story! from a 20+ yrs old bike to this beauty with eggbeaters and the works.. 853 with a Fox fork must be one sweet ride! i bet you must be marvelling at how mtbikes have evolved.

    but why is your fox decal-less??

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparst
    wow... i love your story! from a 20+ yrs old bike to this beauty with eggbeaters and the works.. 853 with a Fox fork must be one sweet ride! i bet you must be marvelling at how mtbikes have evolved.

    but why is your fox decal-less??
    Yes, it has been fun. Not nearly as exciting as when this then-college kid rolled out on his first new bike with big fat knobbies. As much as bikes have evoloved, my Fisher is still an amazing piece of equipment. I don't know many others who are riding their college bikes every day 20 years later! But the new bike is still great fun, of course. I'm a nut for sticker removal. You'll notice the Mavic rims have the crap removed from them too. I don't need to advertise for companies when I've already paid for their product. And the less others know about the bike, the less likely that they'll covet it... I hope. I enjoy having and experiencing my high-quality goods. I don't need to let everybody else on the trail know what it is. Who wants to steel a bike with a no-name fork?

    I remove emblems from my automobiles as well. Just the way I am.
    -= Darell The EVnut

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by darelldd
    Yes, it has been fun. Not nearly as exciting as when this then-college kid rolled out on his first new bike with big fat knobbies. As much as bikes have evoloved, my Fisher is still an amazing piece of equipment. I don't know many others who are riding their college bikes every day 20 years later! But the new bike is still great fun, of course. I'm a nut for sticker removal. You'll notice the Mavic rims have the crap removed from them too. I don't need to advertise for companies when I've already paid for their product. And the less others know about the bike, the less likely that they'll covet it... I hope. I enjoy having and experiencing my high-quality goods. I don't need to let everybody else on the trail know what it is. Who wants to steel a bike with a no-name fork?

    I remove emblems from my automobiles as well. Just the way I am.
    er...very unique way of thinking?! though without decals your steed still looks expensive and eye-catching, so don't ever lock it and leave it unattended like a streetbike. it'll be gone for sure.

    and make no mistake, the mountain bikers you'll meet on the trails can dissect your bike at first sight... so there's no escape cuz......we know.....hehe

    well happy trails!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparst
    er...very unique way of thinking?! though without decals your steed still looks expensive and eye-catching, so don't ever lock it and leave it unattended like a streetbike. it'll be gone for sure.

    and make no mistake, the mountain bikers you'll meet on the trails can dissect your bike at first sight... so there's no escape cuz......we know.....hehe

    well happy trails!
    Hey, a guy can dream. Mostly I just like the look of no stickers and wish I could easily take off the stickers under the clear-coat as well. As far as sniffing around other's bikes... I'm turned into that person now too. Even if a beatiful, naked woman rode up next to me, I think I'd first check out the wheelset. And only THEN the frame.

    I think this aspect of the sport is even stronger in the road-bike world. At least in my experience. And trust me - I won't be locking and leaving either of my fancy new bikes. Just won't happen.
    -= Darell The EVnut

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