Custom Ti Thylacine- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Custom Ti Thylacine

    Hi All,

    I thought it might be nice to share my new love.
    My custom Thylacine Arete Ti.

    This frame is insane, great fit and attention to detail is amazing.

    This frame is equivalent to a large and weighs in at 1540g.

    Last edited by royale_; 11-02-2006 at 05:04 PM.

  2. #2
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    Good job!

    wow.. 1.5kg for a large ti frame is damn light! looks good too, esp the stripes..kinda like the beast waiting to gobble the trail..lol

    you mentioned it's custom.. custom by yourself or based on their recommended specs?
    curious about few things:

    BB height?
    actual chainstay length? (not effective length)
    angles? 71/73?

  3. #3
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    Ive been speaking to warwick @ thy. He'll be doing a build for me in the few weeks. Nice bike !

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparst
    wow.. 1.5kg for a large ti frame is damn light! looks good too, esp the stripes..kinda like the beast waiting to gobble the trail..lol

    you mentioned it's custom.. custom by yourself or based on their recommended specs?
    curious about few things:

    BB height?
    actual chainstay length? (not effective length)
    angles? 71/73?
    The thylacines definitely have a unique look thats for sure. I love the stripes on the top tube too.

    BB height is 12", chainstays 427mm, angles are 71/71.5

    Heres a tech drawing if anyone is interested. This isn't the final drawing, buts it's pretty much it.
    http://www.thylacinecycles.com/galle...C_AreteTi02_A3

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by 20_bandh
    Ive been speaking to warwick @ thy. He'll be doing a build for me in the few weeks. Nice bike !
    Sweet!

    It's well worth the wait that for sure.

  6. #6
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    20 bandh - that sounds sweet..... wat about your xlite? still a keeper? awaiting pics of your new frame!

    royale - i must say the drawing impresses me. the attention to detail is amazing! also their concept of varying seat angle with chainstay length is intriguing. i think these guys mean serious business.... congrats on your fine bike!

  7. #7
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    @ Sparst - I will sell on the x-lite. It is a great frame, really light. I am going to attempt an alp crossing next year, and am not sure that the x-lite will be upto it with
    all of the weight that i'll be carrying.
    I must say that I am very impressed with Thycycles, Warwick the owner comes across as very knowledgable and professional. I was considering going with Strong,
    but he is a bit more expensive.

  8. #8
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    Kewl, another Thylacine Thread!

    Holy schmokes - an ALPS crossing? That's impressive! I MUST BUILD THIS BIKE FOR YOU DAVE! That's a serious challenge.

    I have a great book on great MTB rides of the world called "Classic Mountain Bike Rides - Thirty of the World's most spectacular Trails" and there's one that follows the Hautes Pyrenees from Bourg-d'Oueil to the seaside town of Hendaye; and theres one that's the "Tour de Mont Blanc" which is basically a big lap of Mont Blanc starting and finishing in Chamonix. Both look totally amazing.

    Anyway, thanks for the kind words fellas and thanks for sharing the pix of your bike all built up, Royale. I have to say, it was very hard to let that baby out of the den - I wanted to keep her for myself!
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  9. #9
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    Hope you don't mind my sidetracking here.. but this has been bugging me (in a good way) ever since i read your article on breaking the traditionl of seat angle. i'm a short fella on a 14" ct-ct ti custom hardtail. research/feedback concluded that i shd keep the magical 71/73....which i did. as to the weight distribution, without daring to question the magic numbers, wat i did was to get shorter chainstays to keep things balanced(or so i thought). your proposition is to slacken the seat angle, i wonder if my shortening of chainstay while keeping the 73 will be something in the same effect? i think you're totally spot-on regarding the 100-120mm stem length for xc.

    those were great articles you wrote, can i say bold? but very insightful, definitely got me thinking

  10. #10
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    That's always been my intention Sparst - to get people thinking and not to be sheep and regurgitate the party line. Progress doesn't involve nodding and saying 'yes sir', it's about saying 'Is that right?', so I commend you for taking the time to think about things in more depth and for asking the tough questions.

    My theory on geometry is based pretty much on looking at three things - A riders' three contact points, and their Centre of Gravity (CG) in relationship to wheelbase, and steering geometry. Everything stems from that, and if you start with these as fundamentals, you can quickly start to see that arbitrary numbers are meaningless.

    My aim isn't to slacken seat angles - it's to realise that in slackening the seat angle or simply sitting further back on the bike, you change weight distribution to be more rearward, which means you have to lengthen the stays to compensate. There's nothing bold about that - it's just common sense. For so long we've been shackled by the notion of you wanting your chainstays as short as possible because somehow that makes you climb better, and that 71/73 angles work for almost everyone just because that's how it's always been (despite the advent of suspension forks and straight seatposts).

    For a shorter guy like you, I think you probably did the right thing choosing 71/73 and going with short stays to compensate. Difficult to know without knowing all the details, but from where I'm sitting, you definitely put some thought into the whole package.
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  11. #11
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    i've noticed that 99% of manufacturers standardize their chainstay lengths throughout their sizes. some vary the seat angle(within 74-72.5), some don't at all. since most of us started off with stock bikes, i think there's high possibility most didn't get the optimal frame/geometry for our bodies. so the foundation got screwed, our bodies adapt to wat we have, and accept it. so eventually we may never get it right. these were my initial thoughts, which were exactly wat u spoke of in your articles. so watever u said, i basically bought it! lol

    my current frame is my first ever custom, which is basically a modified version of my previous stock bike.. so i have this feeling i've not gotten it right.. better definitely, but most probably not perfect. i wonder if most ppl who went custom really got it? i think a combination of a good fit program, knowledgeable builder and an intimate knowlege of our own bodies w.r.t our riding style(ahem!) will yield the best result.

    'bold' was meant for the EFBe article actually....but i sure enjoyed the way u titled it! LOL
    a breath of fresh air indeed.... i feel you're very much needed in this industry. keep up the great work!
    Last edited by sparst; 05-12-2006 at 10:06 AM.

  12. #12
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    I'm just lucky that Thylacine is only 4 years old in some respects. It means I can grossly over-service my clients and it means they get a cracking deal. I have no problems with the larger companies that talk to you on the phone a couple of times and spit out a boring CAD drawing and call that custom. They're in the biz to make money and it's simply not economically feasable for them to lavish the attention we do on our clients. That's just opportunity knocking as far as I'm concerned.

    As for my EFBe article, I guess it's not the smartest title ever devised, but I still hold those opinions. People often hold professionals such as doctors, lawyers and engineers as 'beyond scrutiny' because we think that because something appears out of our scope of understanding, that somehow we should automatically assume trust. Trust is earned and often things aren't as complicated as they seem (or more accurately, many professions overcomplicate simple concepts to make them appear more unique to that profession than they really are). Anyway, I'm not alone with my opinions of the EFBe tests, and their shortcomings are pretty obvious. Take a structure that's designed to take dynamic loads (a bike frame), bolt it to something solid and apply massive static loading to it to induce failure. Yep, that's pretty realistic!

    Anyway. as you can tell I like to rabbit on. Thanks for the kudos anyway - it's a refreshing change from the shellacing I usually get!
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  13. #13
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    Hrm, wonder if this should become the default official Thylacine thread?

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  14. #14
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    Wow, ive never seen a brick coloured bike before. It looks GREAT !! Im sure that my marmalade paint job will look even better !

  15. #15
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    Yours will be the antithesis of this frame. This is carved out of a piece of central Australia, yours is like....yeah, marmalade.....with gold leaf sprinkles!

    You should stick the drawing up here so people can gawk at it and bask in it's orangeness.
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  16. #16
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    whoa, nicey nice. i'm liking how the top decal goes up the top tube brace. how were you able to swing thait without stretching it to the point where it looked deformed?

    figured i'd add that this frame is built for a rohloff. i know there are a few people lurking around here with interest in a rohloff bike.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by lanceh
    whoa, nicey nice. i'm liking how the top decal goes up the top tube brace. how were you able to swing thait without stretching it to the point where it looked deformed?

    figured i'd add that this frame is built for a rohloff. i know there are a few people lurking around here with interest in a rohloff bike.
    Originally I was going to put the decal forward of the cross-brace, but then I thought I'd try it like that and whaddaya know - it looks pretty good. The decals themselves are wafer thin, so they will stretch with very little encouragement.

    This is our first 'Arete for Rohloff' so I'm keen to see what Adam thinks when he builds it up. I think routing the cables under the chainstay/downtube is the way to go because they'll almost be invisible when you're standing over the bike.
    Last edited by Thylacine; 05-26-2006 at 04:25 PM.
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  18. #18
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    Ok, here she is in all of her Marmalade loveliness.... Opinions welcome
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  19. #19
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    Looks very nice. Why both v and disc mounts? It would look much cleaner with just one type imho. Is an integrated style disc mount (like IF uses) also an option. I believe paragon does those as well. What transalp route are you planning to take and how are you planning to carry the luggage. Is one of those bob trailers an idea? Do you really think the Dean isn`t up to it or were you just in the mood for something new...which is offcourse understandable...I have it all the time...
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    Morati rigid fork (disk)

  20. #20
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    20_bandh insists on using those Magura thingies. Maybe you can berate him about that.

    The Paragon shrouded dropouts and the seperate disc mount look really, really nice, and as an added bonus have a replaceable derailleur hanger. The 'integrated' Paragons don't at the moment, and are fiddly to mitre because you have to use the stay bullets etc etc. They can be done if someone wants them and can live without the replacable hanger though, no worries there.

    We're tooled up to mitre the stays for Wright-style dropouts so it's just easier for us that way, and they're arguably stronger and lighter to boot.

    Stronger, lighter, more accurately mitred =
    Last edited by Thylacine; 05-27-2006 at 10:20 PM.
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  21. #21
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    Yup, those are damn sexy bikes. Have there been any pics on mtbr of Thylacine 29er frames? Very impressive
    "I'll disintegrate over time if I expect my body to try to keep up with my mind" -BM

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  22. #22
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    Just squint and imagine a 26er frame with a smaller headtube and longer stays.

    We've had quite a few enquiries and quoted for quite a few 29ers but no private customer has ponied up yet. Few reasons for that. 1) We're in Australia. There's maybe 3 29ers in the whole country, and two of those are reserved for Gary Fisher when he comes here on holiday 2) We're not cheap so we don't appeal to those who for some reason like to what we call "Supercharge their Hyundais". 3) We're loud-mouth Aussies who like to poke fun at stuff, including 29ers, couriering on 5 grand bikes, capri pants, but mostly ourselves couriering on our 5 grand bikes wearing capri pants.

    It's a tough position to be in.
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  23. #23
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    Well, the 29ers seem to be gaining momentum by leaps and bounds lately so it's probably just a matter of time. I look forward to seeing the first, keep us in the loop.
    "I'll disintegrate over time if I expect my body to try to keep up with my mind" -BM

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20_bandh
    Ok, here she is in all of her Marmalade loveliness.... Opinions welcome
    i can see it's gonna be one sexy thang.. hot

  25. #25
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    I certainly hope it will be hot. I left the geometry to Warwick, my only stipulation was that it was to have alot of standover.
    I asked Warwick a couple of times when he is going to start building and he keeps on giving it all of this "Patience Grasshopper" spill.. He's a cruel man....... !

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    one more for the show

    well now that my design has been signed off i guess i'll add it to the mix.

    since it's hard to read i'll include the geometry

    HTA = 71
    STA = 72
    HT = 139mm
    TT (effective) = 610mm
    ST = 450mm
    CS = 415mm - 432mm (variable due to paragon's)
    BB = 305mm
    rear tire clearance = 70mm
    Standover (measured through the bb) = ~752
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    Last edited by lanceh; 05-30-2006 at 08:29 AM.

  27. #27

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    Nice one lance!

    The sliding dropouts are a nice touch. I think my next frame will have some of those puppies.

  28. #28
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    Hi Warwick, was just wondering what your take was on the gusseting of headtubes on ti bikes. I have seen that Seven and some other Ti manufacturers have started to gusset this area. Is it really necessary?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20_bandh
    Hi Warwick, was just wondering what your take was on the gusseting of headtubes on ti bikes. I have seen that Seven and some other Ti manufacturers have started to gusset this area. Is it really necessary?

    I think there's an arguement if you're going to be running 100-125mm forks, but I'd much rather go from an atypical 0.035" wall to a 0.048" wall to counter the extra leverage.

    Couple of reasons for this. Firstly, less heat in the critical HT-DT juncture can only be good. Second, frames tend to crumple or 'coke-can' because the wall thickness to diameter ratio is too marginal to counter the specific bending loads. Thirdly, most gussets just simply add a stress riser of some description, often encouraging frames to fail in the first place.

    All this might be a bit academic if the shortage of 38mm tubing keeps up. Everyone seems to be suffering at the moment.

    Repeat after me brothas - BIKES NOT BOMBS!!!!
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  30. #30
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    What's with the Top Tube Decal

    The rest of the bike looks fine, but please peel the top tube decal off.

  31. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by neville
    The rest of the bike looks fine, but please peel the top tube decal off.
    I really like the top tube decal. It's kinda clever.

    If you look up to see what a thylacine is, it then makes sense.

    If your too lazy to google. A thylacine is a Tasmanian tiger. Hence the tiger stripes across the top tube.

  32. #32
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    I'm from Australia, I know what thylacine is/or was.
    To each there own I suppose.
    Nice bike otherwise.
    Why the low bar and high seat combo.

  33. #33
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    I think that the stripey decal is a real eyecatcher, its very original and makes the frame stand out in a posititive sense. Ive requested that a layer of clearcoat be sprayed over the top to help protect the decals from peeling and damage.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by neville
    I'm from Australia, I know what thylacine is/or was.
    To each there own I suppose.
    Nice bike otherwise.
    Why the low bar and high seat combo.

    Don't sweat it Nev, you'll earn your stripes one day.
    Last edited by Thylacine; 06-29-2006 at 02:26 AM.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thylacine
    Just squint and imagine a 26er frame with a smaller headtube and longer stays.

    We've had quite a few enquiries and quoted for quite a few 29ers but no private customer has ponied up yet. Few reasons for that. 1) We're in Australia. There's maybe 3 29ers in the whole country, and two of those are reserved for Gary Fisher when he comes here on holiday 2) We're not cheap so we don't appeal to those who for some reason like to what we call "Supercharge their Hyundais". 3) We're loud-mouth Aussies who like to poke fun at stuff, including 29ers, couriering on 5 grand bikes, capri pants, but mostly ourselves couriering on our 5 grand bikes wearing capri pants.

    It's a tough position to be in.
    I think that prehaps you better start opening your eyes a bit . Here in Brissie I can think of 12 off hand, including my own Ventana El Comandante. I don't think it will be long until there is a much greater demand for them, particularly by those long of shank and singlespeeders.

  36. #36
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    Well, firstly let me just say of the amazing cultural contributions Queensland has made to the Australian way of life, 12 29ers riding around Brizvegas HAS to be top of the list.

    I mean, I didn't think I'd ever say this, but that is WAY better than Cane Toads, XXXX beer, or kangaroo scrotom coin pouches!

    In all seriousness though, if we do ever make a 29er for an Australia customer, it will probably be though Shannon with whom we are currently talking about a distribution deal. He seems to be going a great job promoting his imports and promoting 29" bikes, so we'd be super stoked to have him rep for us.
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  37. #37
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    Thats a very sharp looking bike....

    I had the pleasure of I.M.ing with Warwick at Thylacine Cycles yesterday and really enjoyed the time.

    A sweet Thylacine ti frame you have there.....they make sweet steel frames as well and if you are keen they'll do a 953 steel on for you.

    Unfortunately I have to many "forks in the fire" at the moment - as the bike slush fund only goes so far.

    I also did a bit of research on the Thylacine and what it was - a very *****in looking large carnivorous marsupial. I like *****in marsupials.

    Cheers, C
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  38. #38
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    Nice, very nice.

    I noticed you've gone with brace on the stays near the disc brake tab.
    What was the reason for the extra bracing?

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by royale_
    Nice, very nice.

    I noticed you've gone with brace on the stays near the disc brake tab.
    What was the reason for the extra bracing?
    I wanted a bit of extra rigidity there to improve the brake-feel. The early 221s we did without the brace were fine and dandy, but there was a bit of brake shudder there that I didn't like. Adding the brace there minimised that.

    The theory with the Ti frames is that the stays should be beefy enough not to need it (19mm vs 15mm for steel). In theory they are, but the 20g that little brace provides just that little bit better feel when you jam on the brakes.

    A minute improvement but one that's worth it I think. If someone is really averse to the 'look' we'll do it without, but you'll have to accept a less optimal brake-feel.
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  41. #41
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    it's looking good... there's nothing sexier than ti

  42. #42
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    True true. Should have it in my greasy mitts by the end of the month

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    almost forgot you're gonna have it painted. a little pity, to me at least, cuz damn ti looks so darn good!

    any worries about the paint holding up? i always have this impression that it's harder to paint ti, and also poorer durability of paint on ti

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    actually, dave decided to not have it painted. spectrum is pretty backed up at the moment and he didn't want to wait for them. both his bike and mine will be satin finished bare Ti.

  45. #45
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    I'm constantly amazed at the myths circlicling Ti. You can paint it just as easily and just as readily as anything else. It requires no special treatment as far as I know.

    Actually no.....it's very difficult. VERY difficult. It's special modulous of elasticity means that paint won't stick to it. It's just like painting a rubber band.

    That will be 500 bucks please!
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  46. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thylacine
    I'm constantly amazed at the myths circlicling Ti. You can paint it just as easily and just as readily as anything else. It requires no special treatment as far as I know.

    Actually no.....it's very difficult. VERY difficult. It's special modulous of elasticity means that paint won't stick to it. It's just like painting a rubber band.

    That will be 500 bucks please!
    Don't they have to coat the frame with chickens blood forst to make the paint stick.
    Any they can only paint it on the last full moon of the month.


  47. #47
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    Chicken blood, i like it......

    Originally I wanted to have paint but decided against it because of the current turnaround time at spectrum. With proper preperation there is no reason why titanium is less suited to paint/powdercoating than Aluminium or Steel.

    Most ti frames nowadays seem to come with a "brushed" or shiney finish like Royales Arete, but I have decided to go for a "satin" or matt finish like in the picture below.




    I am not exactly sure how this finish is achieved, ??I presume by sandblasting or a chemical dip of sorts??.

    Scratches can be buffed out of a brushed finish very easily using a scotchbrite pad, in contrast to a satin finish where one needs to use a fine grained abrasive paper, along with (so I have been reliably informed) sex wax (what surfers use on their boards) or furniture wax.
    Last edited by 20_bandh; 07-21-2006 at 05:09 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 20_bandh
    Scratches can be buffed out of a brushed finish very easily using a scotchbrite pad, in contrast to a satin finish where one needs to use a fine grained abrasive paper, along with (so I have been reliably informed) sex wax (what surfers use on their boards) or furniture wax.
    your Dean was brushed as i remember? i went with brushed finish due to the ease of buffing out scratches. i love both finishes , just that the brushed one made more sense. so i sure hope your method works cuz my logos are also matte, and i'm hyper paranoid about getting them scratched ( 200+ bucks to refurbish the frame including shipment )

    as for the ti paint myth, i've heard it from somewhere before, though i didn't bother to verify it cuz to me, titanium should be RAW!! lol

    will be looking forward to pics of both you and lanceh's bikes... enjoy the anticipation!

  49. #49
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    This is a pretty slick way of finishing off a Ti frame.

    Jonesy2.jpg
    Last edited by Bigwheel; 07-21-2006 at 07:06 PM. Reason: picture whoas

  50. #50
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    I like the polished/masked/blasted look. I did a similar thing on some frames we did 3-4 years ago, except it was done on some Aluminium frames which we then Nickel plated.

    Those frames were pretty sick. The surface hardness is up there with tool steel, so unlike Ti it was virtually impossible to scratch.

    The Satin finish like above is achieved by bead blasting the frame delicately using 'sand' for want of a better word made from Garnet, silica or Aluminium oxide or similar.
    Last edited by Thylacine; 07-27-2006 at 02:22 AM.
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  51. #51
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    Sparst, rub some furniture wax over the logos, I spoke to a couple of moots owners who told me that this method works a treat. Since Warwick sent me the one teaser pic the anticipation has become almost unbearable, im hoping to get some more from him this weekend. Will post them here.

  52. #52
    No Gansta Lean here.
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    I just dig the fact that this frame is EWR'esque....

    Quote Originally Posted by Thylacine
    Hrm, wonder if this should become the default official Thylacine thread?


    Very EWR (Eastern Woods Research) E-Motion frame vibe. (Previous to that, Grove Innovations) And, I love those sliding drops.

    My EWR Orig. Woods Bike Frame's chainstay length is 15.9". I need the standover that my Woods Bike also offers as I'm 5' 7" but have a 28-29" inseam. Long torso, short legs. So, I'm feelin' the frame in the photo.

    Question. How short can you get the chainstays to go via the sliding dropouts? And, could you (at that shortest chainstay length) still be able to use a 2.3" tyre (heh, heh...tire!) at that shortest chainstay length?
    EWR-HE-148-11-4-97
    Microbeer's Better!

  53. #53
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    This is a design I penner earlier in the year, so I'm very familiar with the old EWR's. Ironically perhaps the design actually solves a lot of 29er issues such as bad standover and bad fork clearance.

    Doing a 26er version of this frame would be fairly easy, although 16" chainstays and 2.3" tires is pushing the friendship a little, esp. in the front derailleur/tire relationship department. However, I think it would just be a matter of CADing the whole thing up very accurately and specific to an exact set of chainstays and working around those.

    With Adam's 'the Brown Hornet' if memory serves me correctly the CS range was 16.25 - 17", with a 2.0 fitting with some mud clearance.
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  54. #54
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    In the same breath as I say I love those sliding drops...

    I don't think that there's anything cleaner looking than those hooded Breezer style drop outs. The original design was started by the Wright Brothers if I remember correctely. Guess that there's a lot of contact area for the weld with them as well, huh?

    And, Yup, your 29'er design is just like my Woods Bike. (which I had a nice ride on this AM!)
    Cheers!
    EWR-HE-148-11-4-97
    Microbeer's Better!

  55. #55
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    I have a sneaky suspicion this thread is going to be inundated with pictures of grey bikes in the next 48 hrs.

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  56. #56
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    Im not so confident it will, but i'd LOVE to be proved wrong.

  57. #57
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    Thanks for the pix Dave! More to follow....

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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thylacine
    Thanks for the pix Dave! More to follow....
    Nice . looks like a small XC frame, 16" C-T?

  59. #59
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    Hey Thylacine, lovely looking frame.

    However, since it's self promotion, why not shoot it in its natural environment? A glimpse of grey through the tangled forests of SE Australia would really be tantalising ....

    (Just a little uncalled-for input from a photographer here.)

    Cheers,
    Graeme
    What if the Hokey Pokey is what it's all about?
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    My photography web site: www.scenebyhird.com

  60. #60
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    man, that frame looks familiar.

    looks like pictures of mine will have to wait a few more days.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by lanceh
    man, that frame looks familiar.

    looks like pictures of mine will have to wait a few more days.
    Come on Lance! The world wants to see your baby. Hang it out the window fer cryin' out loud!

    There's plenty of pix of Thylacines in their natural environment in the gallery kalgrm. Check it out.

    Last edited by Thylacine; 08-15-2006 at 03:18 PM.
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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thylacine
    This is a design I penner earlier in the year, so I'm very familiar with the old EWR's. Ironically perhaps the design actually solves a lot of 29er issues such as bad standover and bad fork clearance.

    Doing a 26er version of this frame would be fairly easy, although 16" chainstays and 2.3" tires is pushing the friendship a little, esp. in the front derailleur/tire relationship department. However, I think it would just be a matter of CADing the whole thing up very accurately and specific to an exact set of chainstays and working around those.

    With Adam's 'the Brown Hornet' if memory serves me correctly the CS range was 16.25 - 17", with a 2.0 fitting with some mud clearance.
    did you ever built one of this ?
    it look like something i was looking for, as my new bike ....

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppy
    did you ever built one of this ?
    it look like something i was looking for, as my new bike ....
    I'd love to build everything that pops into my head poppy, but that's not possible at this stage!

    If you're after something like the EBR pictured above, we can certainly build one for you, no problems there. Drop us an e-mail.
    No longer member of the bike industry nor society, so don't hassle me.

  64. #64
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    Well hello there little lady.

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  65. #65
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    Can someone enlighten me to the purpose or advantage/disadv. for the sliding dropouts?

  66. #66
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    Never mind, I figured it out but at least you got a bump.

  67. #67
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    Just a sneak-peek at one of the 2007 Arete SL Team frames we're doing. They're custom painted Yellow > Orange halftone fade in the same paint that Lamborghini uses on the Gallardo. (Nice!) Totally unique geometry and tubing spec utilising the best individual tubes from Reynolds, Columbus, and Nova. Here's a preview......
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  68. #68
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    Here are a couple of pics of my Thylacine taken yesterday on the banks of the Chiemsee (Southern Bavaria), just before it started pissing down with rain.



    Last edited by 20_bandh; 01-15-2007 at 01:36 PM.

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