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  1. #1
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    CT on a rigid SS?

    CT and MTB noob here, formerly west coast roady. Iím local to Storrs currently and have been riding the airline trail pretty regularly, looking to expand to single track.

    I was looking into steel hard tails (mostly because thatís one less shock to worry about), and a friend of a friend pointed me toward a rigid SS bike for a price thatís doesnít make me wince too much in the All City Log Lady.

    Just curious if folks have opinions on how suitable a rigid SS will be on single track in CT, say from Farmington eastward.

    Iíll get plenty of mileage out of the frame on trails alone where I currently ride a fat tire road bike, but Iíd like to get a general sense of whether Iíll need more bike right off the bat.

    thanks for reading!

  2. #2
    ZEN RIDER!
    Reputation: Mt.Biker E's Avatar
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    Depends on the trail and rider skill. Started off on a hardtail and rode pretty much everything I ride now. The trade off is how badly its beats you up and how fast you want to ride rocky terrain. There is plenty of smooth single track, Spooner's trails in Salmon river are great for beginner and rigid bikes as there is little tech & rocks.
    Have you tried looking for used xc full suspension? It would allow you for more options as far as ride areas.
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  3. #3
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    All I've owned in the past 15 years is rigid bikes. I've borrowed a few full suspensions. They are faster in certain situations. Slower in some too. Riding a rigid takes more skill, you can't just plow over everything.

    Rigid with plus tires is a whole lot of fun in CT.

  4. #4
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    If you're going rigid here make it a fat bike. It'll soften up the trails a bit, make the beaches ridable and it is going to snow 6-7months from now.

  5. #5
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    I see very few full rigids on Eastern CT trails but they are out there. Most of the singletrack around here has a fair amount of bone and roots. I went full sus 20 years ago but there's still lots of hardtail lovers out there.

    I'm less than 30 minutes from Storrs. We ride year round and there's a TON of great singletrack to choose from within 45 minutes of you. Check out Nathan Hale, Grayville, Mooween, Gay City, Day Pond, Crandalls, Case, Bluff, Rockland, The Preserve...lots of variety but all good!
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  6. #6
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    Plenty of fully rigid SS riders out there in CT (including myself when I choose to ride that bike), at least where I typically ride. They are in West Hartford Reservoir, Cowles Park and the Case Mtn area all the time.

  7. #7
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    Not much time to post atm but wanted to thank you folks for the feedback. Much to think about. I hadnít considered a fat bike nor plus tires and wasnít familiar with even half the trails mentioned! Following up on some of the tips has led me to nemba and alltrails, great resources.

  8. #8
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    I just moved to Western CT (Danbury area) this last winter. I sold my full suspension before moving here from Portland, OR (living in Colorado before that), and now just have my rigid SS. In the winter it wasn't bad, but now that the trails aren't rock hard or I'm riding through snow I'm desperate to get at least a hardtail 29er. Lately htough I'm thinking I want to go full suspension. The trails around me are REALLY bumpy with both rocks and roots. Locals' definition of "flowy" or "buff" is comical coming from Colorado. In both Oregon and Colorado you could get away with riding a cross bike on some mellower trails, but I wouldn't even think about that here.

    I get by for now on my rigid singlespeed, but I am definitely looking to buy another bike. If you haven't ridden much MTB before I would definitely NOT recommend a rigid SS to start with here.

  9. #9
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    In general we have a lot of roots and rocks and a rigid bike would not be my choice. Even a hardtail can be a handful on most of the stuff I ride.

  10. #10
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    Well, I decided to buy the bike last weekend and have logged about 50 or so miles thus far. To answer my op, yes, rigid ss has been great so far. My expectations are probably much different (lower) than an experienced rider. Iíve been having a blast and the bike, and ss in particular, has been a joy.

    Thereís a ton more to explore and perhaps Iíll look toward a suspension fork as I get more familiar with the trails.

  11. #11
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    Just like everyone has said - it depends on where you're riding in CT. Of the three parks i ride the most, Huntington, Waldo, and Wilton Woods, personally i would only do rigid in waldo and maybe certain trails in Huntington with fat tires. I can't imagine doing Wilton Woods in Rigid...too many rock garden and roots...and more rock garden...
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  12. #12
    hello pot? this is kettle
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    I'm in northwest CT, riding a 28 year old full rigid 26" steel SS for almost 10 years now. The only things I don't do are 'freeride' style manmade jumps. Rocks? Roots? Sure. Faster in some sections, slower in others. Like other's have said, depends on the rider. I ride with people with modern bikes (fat bikes, 29er rigid and fully suspended, 27.5, etc) and have no problem keeping up.

  13. #13
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    I've done it and I really enjoy it...although I'm not sure it's something I would want to ride as my only mtb. I don't think I'd do it that way without trying it first to see if it was your cup of tea.

  14. #14
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    Public Service Announcement: One thing I've noticed after riding rigid in Western CT for 7 months now. CHECK YOUR BOLTS. I've banged off a bottle cage and now seem to have lost my crank bolt. Rigid bikes take an especially good beating on the rocky trails here, so just make sure you're not rattling something off your bike.

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