what type of tool is needed to adjust the screws for the bike yoke revive clamp?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    what type of tool is needed to adjust the screws for the bike yoke revive clamp?

    What type of tool is needed to adjust the screws for the Bike Yoke Revive clamp? I rode on my BY Revive for the first time since having it installed and realized that the saddle needed to be tilted down a bit. But the adjustment screws under the clamp don't appear to accept an allen wrench. It looks like the adjustment screws may accept a Phillips head screwdriver but I tried a random small Phillips screwdriver that I had laying around and it didn't seem to connect in the screw insert. So what tool do I need exactly in order to adjust the BY Revive clamp screws?

  2. #2
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    Sorry, I don't have the bike so can't be sure.

    Are the screws a Torx tip? Look up the pattern. They look like a star, sort of.
    Some brake rotors and brake clamps are using Torx bits. Maybe a T-25 or T-30. Your multi-tool may have one if you have a modern multi-tool.

  3. #3
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    Page 16 of the Revive manual says it's a t25 torx. Every rider should have a t25 as it is commonly used on a lot of other parts of the bike.

  4. #4
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    Both of my revive posts are standard 4mm hex bolts for the seat clamp. If they are torx, they should be easily identifiable as such, that would be a running change with the product. If you don't have torque drivers, you should, for brake rotor bolts, frame bolts and a few other things that sometimes use them. They make them in tools that come with all sizes in a fold-up format, rather than the individual drivers for socket wrenches. Most bicycle multi-tools have at least a T25. I have one that has a bunch, due to the increased usage of smaller torx on some stems. The suggestion that you should use a screwdriver on a bicycle bolt makes me question your familiarity and mechanical experience with bicycles. There is almost no spot that uses a screwdriver, save for some derailleur limit adjusters, shifter caps, etc. Definitely no high-torque areas use one.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  5. #5
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    Are Torx relatively new to bicycles?

    My 2016 Specialized only has Torx screws for rotor bolts. My 2000 Specialized has no Torx, and the multi tool I purchased around 2010 doesn't have a Torx. The only multi-tool I have with a Torx tool is the SWAT tool that came with the 2016.

    The ex's SantaCruz has Torx bit brake levers (or was it shifter), but neither of her 3 multi-tools have a Torx bit.

  6. #6
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    Germans love the Torx.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Are Torx relatively new to bicycles?
    If you haven't bought anything for 20 years? Yes? My Turner frame from 2005 had them and I assume the ones from before did as well...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
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    what type of tool is needed to adjust the screws for the bike yoke revive clamp?-glasses.jpg
    What a perfect waste of time

  9. #9
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    bike yoke always has the manuals online

    they switched from allen to t25 torx

    https://www.bikeyoke.de/media/produc...l_en_final.pdf
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Are Torx relatively new to bicycles?
    no, they have been used for rotor bolts for a LONG time. my stem has torx bolts, but that is the only place I can think of it on my bike besides the rotor bolts. there's some debate if bicycles are the best application for torx. personally, I would be thrilled if every small-ish on my bike could be tightened with a t25 or a philips if it does not need a lot of torque. think about how simple that would be!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    no, they have been used for rotor bolts for a LONG time. my stem has torx bolts, but that is the only place I can think of it on my bike besides the rotor bolts. there's some debate if bicycles are the best application for torx. personally, I would be thrilled if every small-ish on my bike could be tightened with a t25 or a philips if it does not need a lot of torque. think about how simple that would be!
    My chain ring bolts are arbitrarily t30. It's very annoying

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    bike yoke always has the manuals online

    they switched from allen to t25 torx

    https://www.bikeyoke.de/media/produc...l_en_final.pdf
    Good to know, and yes, that comes standard on almost every multi-tool, so nothing there requires tools that most riders don't already have.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfinator View Post
    My chain ring bolts are arbitrarily t30. It's very annoying
    for real! I had Shimano cranks with those t30 bolts and I looked for CR bolts with a t25 with no luck. I switched to a Raceface Cinch crank/chainring interface and that is no longer an issue. I find that CR bolts with a 5mm allen often round out because I torque them to the prescribed amount (12Nm, which seems like a lot for such a short bolt) and a drop of 242 threadlocker. it's hard to crack them loose when you want to remove them. I avoid aluminum CR bolts for this reason. a broken one is a ride-ender, but it's not hard to carry a spare for that reason. blah blah blah. rant over.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    save for some derailleur limit adjusters, shifter caps, etc.
    I've been seeing 2mm hex bolts being used for derailleur adjustment screws more and more recently. 3 mtb's in my garage have no need for philips screwdrivers whatsoever.

    My newest mtb doesn't have many torx bolts on it at all. Just the bleed ports on the brakes. My wife's bike has quite a few. The brakes, shifter, and dropper levers are full of torx bolts. Also the rotor bolts. I dislike rotor bolts, so I try to use centerlock hubs where possible (I have no problem with 6 bolt rotors, and use a lot of 6 bolt to centerlock adapters). None of my stems use torx, but I've definitely seen stems that do.

    Even on my older bikes that use regular screws for derailleur adjustments, I prefer using a flat screwdriver over philips (they should all have a bigger slot in the screw head for a flat screwdriver). Honestly, I'd rather bike multitools eliminate the philips bit altogether to ensure they have at least a T-25.

  15. #15
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    My 2016 specialized only has torx rotor bolts. My 2006 Jamis road bike did not have torx. My 2000 specialized, nope.
    Other bikes I've helped work on, haven't noticed any torx bolts either. Except for rotors.

    I like them, a good compromise between pillips and allen. Positive engagement and more points of engagement option than an allen.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    ...on my older bikes that use regular screws for derailleur adjustments, I prefer using a flat screwdriver over philips...
    Me too. I use a nice sharp square-edged flat screwdriver that fits the slot securely. You can make one by carefully using a grinder to shape the end of one that is somewhat too large. I've been able to turn nearly frozen road FD limit screws the heads of which would have stripped right out even with a proper JIS philips.

    I was disassembling some decking behind my house over the weekend and the deck screws were T25....
    Do the math.

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