Are these pedals right for me? (RaceFace Chester)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Are these pedals right for me? (RaceFace Chester)

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    I have size 12 feet.. most of the riding i do is on paved trails or hardpack. i do not do anything crazy.. are these pedals adequate for me? do the studs protrude too far, potentially resulting in damaging the sole of my shoe?

    -
    Nylon composite body is light, thin but very durable.

    -16 Replaceable steel pins per pedal ensures you get all the traction you need.

    -Chromoly steel axle is very durable.

    -Smooth and durable sealed bearing and bushing system keeps those spinning.


    -Platform dimensions are 110x101mm.

  2. #2
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    Pedals, along with saddles, are a very personal preference type item. While lots of people will give you information on how good a product is, really it all comes down to personal preference. If you are asking simply "Are these good pedals?" the answer is yes. Many people on the forums here ride them and are happy with their durability, cost and feel. "Plastic" (more like high grade polymer) pedals today are quite well made and offer things that other, more expensive pedals cannot, mainly the durability vs. cost ratio.

    So yes, they are very good pedals. Will they fit your size 12 foot, probably as I am sure there are some here that run them that have larger feet and are just as happy.
    Some alternatives would be OneUP pedals, Crank Bros Crampons, Kona WahWah, Deity pedals, all have a composite variant of their more popular pedals.

  3. #3
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    The Chesters are a bit smaller than the One Up pedal and definitely than the Wah Wah.

    For a size 12, could be small. Hard to say though as I don't have much experience in the pedal fit department. I can tell you I wear a size 10 and they seem alright. I would have move coverage with the larger pedal, for even my feet, but I don't think I need a wider platform to stand on.

    One positive of the Chester pedals is they stand off from the crank arm. I think its the One Up that is very close to the crank arm -you foot is more likely to rub the crank arm on that is all it means. Or maybe it's the Wah Wah that is close to the crank arm.

    If you have a local shop I'd go and take a look. They may cost an additional $10 but it's likely they have Chesters in stock, and will have knowledge of how they compare to others (for size) and for how they work with a larger foot.

  4. #4
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    good point, never thought about it...

    do you know if the high studs can damage sole of shoes? i have never had pedals w studs.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by randum View Post
    photos:
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    I have size 12 feet.. most of the riding i do is on paved trails or hardpack. i do not do anything crazy.. are these pedals adequate for me? do the studs protrude too far, potentially resulting in damaging the sole of my shoe?

    -
    Nylon composite body is light, thin but very durable.

    -16 Replaceable steel pins per pedal ensures you get all the traction you need.

    -Chromoly steel axle is very durable.

    -Smooth and durable sealed bearing and bushing system keeps those spinning.


    -Platform dimensions are 110x101mm.
    Theyre good pedals, yes the pins could potentially tear up soles of shoes. Depends how soft the soles are. They also could potentially tear up your shins, not fun. I think you can find shorter bolts to replace pins and/or not run all of them. I run Hope that have a rounded tip pins, a little less agressive on soles, grips fine with my shoes, and still does a number on shins, lol. Hopes are aluminum and pretty dang expensive tho.

  6. #6
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    Stamp 1 size large are made for of us with feet larger than size 10. I have Chesters but I like my large Stamps more. I will probably pick up the OneUp composite pedals to try them at some point. $50 for great pedals is next to nothing.

    I see no reason to run aluminum bodied pedals except for DH with how great these four pedals are; Stamps, Chesters, OneUps and Wah-Wah IIs.

    I ride 5.10s and I run four longer pins, two on the leading and trailing edges, for extra grip making me nearly clipped in. I am not concerned about tearing up soles, though. Pick up a few M3 bolts in 8mm and 12mm lengths and figure out how much or little grip you can get away with.

  7. #7
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    They are just right for me (w/ size 12 five tens). They are also surprisingly durable for nylon. But you should worry more about the pins damaging your shins rather than your shoes. If I were mostly on hard smooth trails, there is no reason for pins so I'd go for toe clips and leather straps, or even clipless if that floats your boat.

  8. #8
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    I wore (trail) running shoes for years, including 2 years on Chesters.
    Sure they show signs of sole damage but not like I need to toss them in the trash.

    My new bike specific shoe, Bontrager Flatline, has a few wear marks, been riding them for a few months.

    I've got 37 rides on the shoes, about 400 miles.

    The softer the sole, the more grip they provide but those softer soles will tear sooner, which isn't really 'soon'.

  9. #9
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    I wear five ten contacts with my Chesters and the soles are just starting to get really torn up after about 3 years. They'd had great grip. Just be careful of your shins.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    One positive of the Chester pedals is they stand off from the crank arm. I think its the One Up that is very close to the crank arm -you foot is more likely to rub the crank arm on that is all it means.
    Your thinking of the OneUp Alloy pedal, not the composite. The composite is more like a typical pedal with regards to its axle.

    I've ridden both the Chester and OneUp composite pedals extensively, I prefer the OneUp composite for my size 12-12.5 shoes. The Chester feels a bit too narrow, your foot can at times feel like it's about to roll of the side of the pedal. Grip for both is pretty comparable.

    Good luck OP like others have said, its personal preference the only really way to know is to try one and see how it goes there is no magic answer.
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  11. #11
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    the kona wah wahs are event larger!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    Your thinking of the OneUp Alloy pedal, not the composite. The composite is more like a typical pedal with regards to its axle.

    I've ridden both the Chester and OneUp composite pedals extensively, I prefer the OneUp composite for my size 12-12.5 shoes. The Chester feels a bit too narrow, your foot can at times feel like it's about to roll of the side of the pedal. Grip for both is pretty comparable.

    Good luck OP like others have said, its personal preference the only really way to know is to try one and see how it goes there is no magic answer.
    Hey Mr. Ford, a youtube reviewer mentioned that the OneUp pedal has a highspot in the middle where it connects to the crank, resulting in a pressure point. do you notice this?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FUJOI8wiog

    @ 4:12

  13. #13
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    Randum, I do not although that could be a result of the shoes I use. I have 510 impact pros they have a stiffer sole than some of the other 510 models so they don't flex as much. I suppose if you wear the regular freerider you might notice it but it's very minimal.


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    Last edited by Guy.Ford; 04-30-2019 at 08:25 AM.
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  14. #14
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    The OneUp composite are big enough and have a ton of grip. They are slightly convex though so you have to have the spindle in the arch of your foot or it will feel weird. I found this to be a bit of an issue because your foot needs to be in a very specific spot and the long pins make it hard to readjust. I bought Stamp 7's for my new bike and so far solves both of those issues and haven't slipped a pedal at all.

  15. #15
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    OneUp's are definitely designed with the idea of riding with the pedal setup more mid foot toward the arch of your foot as apposed to riding on the ball of your foot. IDK if this a new concept, but there has definitely been a lot of talk about that being where riders have the best grip and are able to put out the more power. There is also a similar movement with clipless shoes that somewhat supports this, with a lot of newer enduro focussed clipless shoes being designed to allow the rider to move the cleat further back towards the arch of the foot to give more power to the pedal stroke.

    If you find your more comfortable on the balls of your feet, you probably wont like the OneUp, you'd probably be happier on Chesters or Wah Wahs.

    Then there is also the new Stamp 1 composite. While it looked promising, it has a pronounced bulge in the center which makes it almost flat across the face with little to no concave. It's actually more similar to the OneUp, with the bulge sort of pushing up into your foot but because its not really convex either, your foot doesn't really bend over the bulge like the OneUp to aid grip, so grip can be compromised a bit in comparison to the others. The aluminum Stamp has a much less pronounced bulge and therefore you can adjust the pins to compensate making the pedal more concave, something that's not really an option with the Stamp 1 unless you run ridiculously long pins.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    OneUp's are definitely designed with the idea of riding with the pedal setup more mid foot toward the arch of your foot as apposed to riding on the ball of your foot. IDK if this a new concept, but there has definitely been a lot of talk about that being where riders have the best grip and are able to put out the more power. There is also a similar movement with clipless shoes that somewhat supports this, with a lot of newer enduro focussed clipless shoes being designed to allow the rider to move the cleat further back towards the arch of the foot to give more power to the pedal stroke.

    If you find your more comfortable on the balls of your feet, you probably wont like the OneUp, you'd probably be happier on Chesters or Wah Wahs.

    Then there is also the new Stamp 1 composite. While it looked promising, it has a pronounced bulge in the center which makes it almost flat across the face with little to no concave. It's actually more similar to the OneUp, with the bulge sort of pushing up into your foot but because its not really convex either, your foot doesn't really bend over the bulge like the OneUp to aid grip, so grip can be compromised a bit in comparison to the others. The aluminum Stamp has a much less pronounced bulge and therefore you can adjust the pins to compensate making the pedal more concave, something that's not really an option with the Stamp 1 unless you run ridiculously long pins.
    heh... funny you mention that... i notice that i prefer the pedal in the centre of my foot, i guess that is the arch? i tried pedalling with the balls of my feet but it just felt wier.d to me.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by randum View Post
    heh... funny you mention that... i notice that i prefer the pedal in the centre of my foot, i guess that is the arch? i tried pedalling with the balls of my feet but it just felt wier.d to me.
    here is some good info, the video helps make some sense of the concept. I've just started re-learning to ride flats, been on clipless for 15+ years, and definitely find I like the mid foot placement better than my old skool ball of foot position. Even on my clipless I moved my cleats as far back as I could and liked that better.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/Shoe-P...dals-2012.html
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by beer_coffee_water View Post
    Stamp 1 size large are made for of us with feet larger than size 10. I have Chesters but I like my large Stamps more. I will probably pick up the OneUp composite pedals to try them at some point. $50 for great pedals is next to nothing.

    I see no reason to run aluminum bodied pedals except for DH with how great these four pedals are; Stamps, Chesters, OneUps and Wah-Wah IIs.

    I ride 5.10s and I run four longer pins, two on the leading and trailing edges, for extra grip making me nearly clipped in. I am not concerned about tearing up soles, though. Pick up a few M3 bolts in 8mm and 12mm lengths and figure out how much or little grip you can get away with.
    i think i will place an order for the Crank Brothers Stamp 1 Large composite!
    they measure 11.4 x 11.1 x 1.3 cm...

    i was measuring the width of my shoe and at the widest point it aligns with the pedal width...

    any last words before i press the purchase button?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by randum View Post
    i think i will place an order for the Crank Brothers Stamp 1 Large composite!
    they measure 11.4 x 11.1 x 1.3 cm...

    i was measuring the width of my shoe and at the widest point it aligns with the pedal width...

    any last words before i press the purchase button?
    Yes, get the Stamp 2 Large instead. The aluminum pedal body uses different pins that aren't as sharp as the Stamp 1's are. They won't bite the back of your legs in hike a bike sections. That's the one thing I don't like about composite pedals.

    I have size 13 feet and actually use the Stamp 3 but if I was concerned about spending too much I would get the Stamp 2.
    Change begins by doing something different.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckleberry hound View Post
    Yes, get the Stamp 2 Large instead. The aluminum pedal body uses different pins that aren't as sharp as the Stamp 1's are. They won't bite the back of your legs in hike a bike sections. That's the one thing I don't like about composite pedals.

    I have size 13 feet and actually use the Stamp 3 but if I was concerned about spending too much I would get the Stamp 2.
    the Stamp 1 is 1.3 cm thick, whereas all others are 1.9 cm. The stamp 2 and stamp 3 are therefore 6mm thicker than the stamp 1... is this additional thickness bad?

    Going from a stamp 2 to a stamp 3 would cost 15 bucks more... is this stamp 3 worth the additional cost for someone who does basic riding on smooth trails?

  21. #21
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    If your trails are rocky then possibly. The Stamp 3's are 16mm thick which is in between the 1 ans 2's. They are also forged instead of cast.
    Is it worth the $15 difference? For me yes but some of my trails have rock gardens. All I know is that my feet love the big platforms and I would by them again.
    Change begins by doing something different.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    OneUp's are definitely designed with the idea of riding with the pedal setup more mid foot toward the arch of your foot as apposed to riding on the ball of your foot. IDK if this a new concept,
    That's how I ride (typical BMX foot position) but even still I found them to be overly sensitive to foot placement. With the Stamp 7 I feel less need to readjust and when I do it's easier to make that adjustment.

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