REMEDY 8 Recommendations? GRIPS, SADDLE, PEDALS- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    REMEDY 8 Recommendations? GRIPS, SADDLE, PEDALS

    Hi All,

    I am looking to pick up some pedals for my (soon to be) Remedy 8 and also swap out grips and saddle.

    How would the Bontrager Line Elite Nylon Resin pedals hold up? Are they good for aggressive riding or crack and snap easily? How about the bearings?

    Looking at the Odi "Troy Lee Designs" grips...thoughts?

    I don't really know where to start with saddles though. Any suggestions would be awesome.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    Honestly, the bike you have really doesn't matter with parts like this.

    Your body is the most important part.

    For pedals, how that relates is with your shoe size. I wear size 12 US shoes, so I need a pedal that's a touch wider. My first platforms were too narrow for my shoes, so my feet wrapped around the outside edge of the pedals. Which caused soreness over time on rough rides, but it also destroyed a pair of shoes. Of course, there are other aspects of pedals that are important, too. The pins, the bodies, the spindles, the cost of service parts, etc. I ended up with DMR Vaults because the size of the platforms fits my feet well, they have grippy pins, and the bodies are thin enough (plenty are thinner, but I'm not so picky about this). Very important for me was the cost of service parts, and the DMR Vaults have affordable rebuild kits AND affordable replacement spindles available (I've bent plenty of spindles on other pedals, and when replacement spindles and bearings/bushings cost as much as a whole new set of pedals, there's a problem).

    For the saddle, your body absolutely is the most important. You're going to have to figure out what works best for you on that bike. It might mean doing a saddle demo until you find one that works, or it might mean buying/selling a few saddles before you find one you like. The other point here is that you just need to try saddles, and give them plenty of time to be certain. That means also giving the stock saddle a fair shake. At minimum, it can help you develop a baseline that you can build on. But you'll have to be able to narrow down WHY you don't like it to learn anything from it.

    Same with grips. Give the stock ones a fair shake. Use them as a baseline to help you decide what to replace them with, if you need to replace them.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Honestly, the bike you have really doesn't matter with parts like this.

    Your body is the most important part.

    For pedals, how that relates is with your shoe size. I wear size 12 US shoes, so I need a pedal that's a touch wider. My first platforms were too narrow for my shoes, so my feet wrapped around the outside edge of the pedals. Which caused soreness over time on rough rides, but it also destroyed a pair of shoes. Of course, there are other aspects of pedals that are important, too. The pins, the bodies, the spindles, the cost of service parts, etc. I ended up with DMR Vaults because the size of the platforms fits my feet well, they have grippy pins, and the bodies are thin enough (plenty are thinner, but I'm not so picky about this). Very important for me was the cost of service parts, and the DMR Vaults have affordable rebuild kits AND affordable replacement spindles available (I've bent plenty of spindles on other pedals, and when replacement spindles and bearings/bushings cost as much as a whole new set of pedals, there's a problem).

    For the saddle, your body absolutely is the most important. You're going to have to figure out what works best for you on that bike. It might mean doing a saddle demo until you find one that works, or it might mean buying/selling a few saddles before you find one you like. The other point here is that you just need to try saddles, and give them plenty of time to be certain. That means also giving the stock saddle a fair shake. At minimum, it can help you develop a baseline that you can build on. But you'll have to be able to narrow down WHY you don't like it to learn anything from it.

    Same with grips. Give the stock ones a fair shake. Use them as a baseline to help you decide what to replace them with, if you need to replace them.
    I agree with everything you are saying, but really Iím only changing these parts out to get a color scheme going to brighten up the bike. If the pedals I am looking at are junk though...they can be rainbow colored and I still wouldnít buy them.

  4. #4
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    I have the same bike. Left stock grips on, put on a chromag mood saddle, have shimano xt spd pedals (but also have one up composites if I decide I want flats) and when the tires wore out I swapped for maxxis minions. The bontrager pedals look good to me.

  5. #5
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    I have used the Bontrager pedals and the ODI TLD grips. Both worked fine and I liked how soft the grips were (but they got torn up easily). I did not like the stock grips. I felt they were too thin and did not offer enough grip when my gloves got wet from sweat. I am currently running and prefer Ergon GE1 grips and Kona wah wah 2 pedals. I am just using the Bontrager seat that came with my bike and it is ok. Have used WTB saddles in the past but have not found anything that has blown me away. Will prob give Ergon saddles a try next to see how I like it.
    2019 Transition Sentinel
    2019 Trek Remedy
    2014 Trek Remedy 8 29er
    2011 Trek Scratch Air 8
    2011 Reign 2
    2008 p.2

  6. #6
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    Try riding the damn thing first. You are going to need pedals regardless. Race Face Chesters are generally thought to be decent flat pedals. Not too expensive, lots of colors.

  7. #7
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    Went with the Bontrager Line Elite pedals, stock grips (but bought another set in orange haha!) and havenít decided on a saddle yet. About to grab the Bell Super DH too, looks pretty nice and has the upgraded MIPS. Chromag Mood saddle looks nice.

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