Dropper Post or cut the existing seat post?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Dropper Post or cut the existing seat post?

    I got my 1st new bike in over 30 years! It's the Vitus Nucleus 275 VRX.

    I've got a couple issues with it and one is the seat height.. At it's lowest position, it's just works.. What I would like is to put the seat down an inch or 2 more, to give me that extra space.. So what do I do?

    Should I cut down the existing seat post or is a dropper post the answer? If I get a dropper post, which size do I need? I see them listed as 105mm, 125mm, 150mm, etc.... Is shorter better?

    School me please..

    BTW, did I mention that I haven't been on a bike in over 30 years? And how do I straighten out a brake rotor? It came warped, so all I heard was Whoosh, whoosh, when I took it for a test ride.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by crabu2 View Post
    I got my 1st new bike in over 30 years! It's the Vitus Nucleus 275 VRX.

    I've got a couple issues with it and one is the seat height.. At it's lowest position, it's just works.. What I would like is to put the seat down an inch or 2 more, to give me that extra space.. So what do I do?

    Should I cut down the existing seat post or is a dropper post the answer? If I get a dropper post, which size do I need? I see them listed as 105mm, 125mm, 150mm, etc.... Is shorter better?

    School me please..

    BTW, did I mention that I haven't been on a bike in over 30 years? And how do I straighten out a brake rotor? It came warped, so all I heard was Whoosh, whoosh, when I took it for a test ride.
    Congratulations on your new bike, Crabu2!

    How handy/experienced are you with tools? Both cutting the seatpost and truing the rotor are fairly simple tasks, but both require certain tools. If you aren't, a bike shop can probably do both things in about 20 minutes.

    You don't need a dropper, though they're a very helpful investment.

    In order to cut the seatpost you need to clamp it somewhere that will hold it firmly without crushing it, such as a vice (preferably with the proper set of jaws. A hacksaw will suffice, even if the resulting cut could be nicer, and a file, preferably one round and one flat one.

    Since you want to be able to lower it a couple of inches, measure the seatpost's length, and mark the spot where you'll cut, from the bottom of the post some 3 inches. You don't want the seatpost to bottom out against the frame, so don't push it down completely when you lower it in the future. Cut it and remove any burs and sharp edges with the files.

    Keep in mind that the original mark for minimum insertion is no longer valid, and should be higher by the amount you cut off from the post.

    If you don't have a rotor-truing tool, you can use an adjustable wrench for it. Find the spot where it's warped and start bending it so that it returns to the center. Perfection might not be attainable if it's too damaged. This is something that requires patience and a gradual approach.

    Look up some videos from Park Tool or GMBN on these issues. They've got lots of great content.

    Good luck!

    Sent from my SM-J710MN using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    I took my pipe cutter to it and took for 2 1/2 inches. That'll let me drop the seat 2 inches, and still feel ok about it.

  4. #4
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    If you are to buy a dropper, which I highly recommend, you'll have to measure the length of seat post that is above the frame seat clamp area( exposed seat post) and measure how much length you have below the clamp. I would add at least a inch to that measure to assure that the new posts clamp and if you decide on a different saddle in the future, might have different specifications than your current seatpost and saddle.
    Also, you need to know if you have a internal stealth cable routing or external routing.

    As far as which dropper you need, by getting the above measurement, figure out what length of dropper you need, how much drop you want and where the collar on the post will be to achieve your exact seat height. I recommend the most drop that will fit on your bike.
    EXODUX Jeff

  5. #5
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    A dropper needs to be at your optimum pedaling height when fully extended. It's not intended to be used to adjust saddle height, but rather to get the saddle out of the way when needed. The overall length of a dropper post needs to fit between the saddle rails at optimum height and the limit of insertion depth in the seat tube. AND, the length from the saddle rails to the bottom of the stanchion collar when fully extended needs to be less than the distance between the rails and the seat post clamp.
    Do the math.

  6. #6
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    Guys, I understand what a dropper is for, but trying to figure out the right size is a problem for me.

    When I was looking last night, A dropper post of about 400mm would be perfect, but it seems they're either 410+, to give me a drop of 120mm or 385 to give me a drop of 100mm.

    Being new to this, I'm not sure which would work, even though I like the 120mm drop better. Plus, I don't want to spend hundreds on a DP, it's not like I'm a hardcore rider.. I think for now cut my existing seat post was the right thing to do.. I'll know better in the next couple of months....

  7. #7
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    Depends on your skill level, and what kind of trails you ride. I ride mostly green and blue trails. I'm 6'1", on an XL frame. I have a 125mm dropper (brand X ascend II) and never drop it fully. All the way down is simply too low. I imagine if I were going down significantly steeper trails maybe I would want it lower...
    I was kind of in the same boat as you before I got it, not sure how much drop I needed. Seeing everything between 100 and 170mm of drop, I was worried 125 wouldn't be enough, but at my current skill level, I think a 100mm dropper would be plenty. With 125 I have some leeway in care I want more in the future....

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dacaur View Post
    Depends on your skill level, and what kind of trails you ride. I ride mostly green and blue trails. I'm 6'1", on an XL frame. I have a 125mm dropper (brand X ascend II) and never drop it fully. All the way down is simply too low. I imagine if I were going down significantly steeper trails maybe I would want it lower...
    I was kind of in the same boat as you before I got it, not sure how much drop I needed. Seeing everything between 100 and 170mm of drop, I was worried 125 wouldn't be enough, but at my current skill level, I think a 100mm dropper would be plenty. With 125 I have some leeway in care I want more in the future....

    Thanks for the feedback.. Your answer was perfect as to get me looking in the right direction for a dropper.

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