Actual weight for Gravity Dropper Turbo LP, comparisons to PNW Pine- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    101

    Actual weight for Gravity Dropper Turbo LP, comparisons to PNW Pine

    Ok, so I'm considering the plunge into dropper posts. My bike requires a 27.2 post and external routing, which narrows the options considerably. That's not so bad (fewer decisions to make!). It looks to me like the PNW Pine and Gravity Dropper Turbo LP are my best bets, given what I've been reading up on. I am thinking a bit about weight, which is where this thread comes in.

    PNW Pine, post only, looks to be 530-535g. But published weights for the Gravity Dropper are all over the place. The GD website says 460g with hardware, but this review (https://nsmb.com/articles/gravity-dr...post-reviewed/) cites 666g (Satanic!) with hardware, which is a giant disparity. Anybody know what the truth is?

    If it matters, I'm planning to hack a road lever for the remote, as this is going on my monstercross, so weight of any included remotes doesn't matter much.

    If this devolves into a discussion of the respective merits of those posts or better alternatives, I'm cool with that.

  2. #2
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: Impetus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,604
    My bike uses a 27.2 seatpost. I have experience with a Gravity post- both real and the TMARS knockoff; and currently have a 3 year old 100mm Pine. I have done literally nothing to it other than smear some slick honey on the stanchion a few times per year. It gets actuated a hundred times per ride and still works flawlessly after all this time.
    Someday I’ll buy a new frame because I want more drop than the 110mm max offered by 27.2 posts, and external routing is clunky and there are better options; but when I do, the dropper that goes in will be another PNW.

    I have no idea what the actual weight of a Pine post is, but I would continue to use the Pine literally no matter how much it weighed. It’s so much better than a Gravity Dropper it’s laughable.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Shiftin' jumps and huckin' gears

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by Impetus View Post
    My bike uses a 27.2 seatpost. I have experience with a Gravity post- both real and the TMARS knockoff; and currently have a 3 year old 100mm Pine. I have done literally nothing to it other than smear some slick honey on the stanchion a few times per year. It gets actuated a hundred times per ride and still works flawlessly after all this time.
    Someday I’ll buy a new frame because I want more drop than the 110mm max offered by 27.2 posts, and external routing is clunky and there are better options; but when I do, the dropper that goes in will be another PNW.

    I have no idea what the actual weight of a Pine post is, but I would continue to use the Pine literally no matter how much it weighed. It’s so much better than a Gravity Dropper it’s laughable.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thanks--that's some really helpful knowledge!

  4. #4
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    My 27.2 Gravity Dropper (classic, not turbo) is 566g including cable and lever. That puts it at the light end of the spectrum. Be aware most published weights do not include cables and levers. There are not many posts that come in under 550g including the lever and cable/hose.

    I have a PNW Cascade as well. It weighs a LOT more (I do not remember how much, but it was a lot), but it is a coil spring, much longer drop, and a thicker size than the GD (30.something). The air versions are lighter, but I didn't want to mess with air. Also, I needed (and prefer) external routing

    PNW is nicer to use, I guess. Has more features, but in reality I don't find the experience all that different. I'll have to see about the longevity. My GD has been on my main rides since 2005, and the last issue I had with it was in 2006. One of the most reliable and maintenance free bike items I own with moving parts.

    I considered getting the GD Turbo for a second bike last year, but I thought GD was out of business because they were non-responsive for about a month, and in the meantime I bought the PNW. Turns out they were on vacation. I think they are done putting much time into that business. They have not updated anything (including the website) in the past 8 or so years. I think the guy has moved on to other projects. That's fine, he earned it, in my book.

    I hear very good things about the CS from PNW.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  5. #5
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: Impetus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,604
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post

    PNW is nicer to use, I guess. Has more features, but in reality I don't find the experience all that different. I'll have to see about the longevity. My GD has been on my main rides since 2005, and the last issue I had with it was in 2006. One of the most reliable and maintenance free bike items I own with moving parts.

    One of the biggest ‘upgrades’ of PNW over GD is PNW has “infinite” height setting, where GD is full up/halfway/full down.

    Also, I always ‘sat’ on my GD to slow the raising of it- softening the ‘slam’ at the top out. Standing up and hitting the lever is....abrupt; and my feeling based on experience and post disassembly is that repeated uncontrolled ascent will eventually damage the post.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Shiftin' jumps and huckin' gears

  6. #6
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by Impetus View Post
    One of the biggest ‘upgrades’ of PNW over GD is PNW has “infinite” height setting, where GD is full up/halfway/full down.

    Also, I always ‘sat’ on my GD to slow the raising of it- softening the ‘slam’ at the top out. Standing up and hitting the lever is....abrupt; and my feeling based on experience and post disassembly is that repeated uncontrolled ascent will eventually damage the post.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    My GD is the Classic (vs the Turbo). You have to butt-tap it to raise it, so your rear end controls the return. I can see how the undamped return of the turbo could cause some wear (not to mention whacking your nether-regions if you don’t get out of the way).

    I saw a review where the guy showed how far in the air the Turbo would launch a stuffed bear sitting on top of the saddle.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I saw a review where the guy showed how far in the air the Turbo would launch a stuffed bear sitting on top of the saddle.
    The turbo on my son's bike pops up hard enough to raise the seat a little throughout the ride. It took a little while to figure out why we'd have to stop mid ride to lower his seat. However, we do like the gravity droppers.

Similar Threads

  1. Gravity Dropper Turbo LP
    By dustyduke22 in forum Components
    Replies: 113
    Last Post: 07-13-2016, 08:59 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-18-2015, 06:36 AM
  3. Gravity Dropper Turbo LP on Ripley
    By dielectric lab in forum Ibis
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-07-2014, 07:19 AM
  4. Fox D.O.S.S. vs Gravity Dropper Turbo LP
    By yamahabdv in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-23-2014, 11:25 AM
  5. Gravity Dropper Turbo LP - Which Remote?
    By Edcft in forum 29er Components
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-20-2013, 07:26 PM

Members who have read this thread: 25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.