Winter Jacket for Mountains?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    56

    Winter Jacket for Mountains?

    Figured I'd ask you guys for advice on this... I'm heading up to Appalachian State in Boone, NC for college in a few months and was considering getting a new winter jacket. I've heard great things about eVent as far as materials go for its breathability, but I'm honestly just looking for whatever's the best deal. Lows are snowy and in the low 20's during the winter, so nothing too crazy. I figure since it's the off season I should be able to find a decent deal somewhere.

    I'm not taking a car, just my commuter, so some insulation is a must.

    Basically, I'm just looking for a cycling compatible winter jacket (shell or lined, but lighter is better) that I won't mind just walking around in either. I'm hoping to find something that won't make me sweat soaked by the time I make it into class.

    I'd like to spend around $150, but that's somewhat flexible, thanks!

  2. #2
    all about the ride down
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    378
    I would go with a good light rain shell like a Marmot Pre-Cip and wear breathable insulating layers under it. You really won't get good breathability from an insulated jacket. With a light, breathable shell you have the option of adjusting layers accordingly. http://marmot.com/fall_2008/mens/out.../precip_jacket
    The More People I Meet the More I Prefer Dogs!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    933
    Assuming you already have a rain shell, I would skip a separate winter jacket. For my daily winter commute in Anchorage (average daily temp is 17 degrees in January). My set up is:

    Me
    snug-fit wicking t-shirt
    Long sleeve midweight wool base layer top
    Long Sleeve Cycling Jersey
    Cycling Windjacket
    Air

    I would substitute the two outer layers for a single windproof fleece or softshell. I'd likely go softshell due to better shedding of falling snow. This set up keeps be warm down to about 10 degrees, lower than that I add a fleece vest under the windshirt. I find commuting at 20 degrees much easier than 40 degrees, as snow precipitation is much more manageable than cold rain.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.