Winter Commuting Cheat Sheet- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Winter Commuting Cheat Sheet

    Hey Guys,

    I was going to go to a class from REI about winter commuting, it was free. However I could not make and I guess a lot of others could not either. So they sent us an email with this cheat sheet. Maybe it will help some of you out maybe it will not.

    https://docs.google.com/fileview?id=...ZjI3Yjk0&hl=en

    pink

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Good read, Thanks. I've seen that class offered and I wondered if I'd be to self-absorbed and arrogant to get anything out of it, since I am the supreme expert and all. There's a lot of stuff there that I'm sure we have all learned with experience, but that would have been a HUGE resource when I was just starting the winter commuting thing.

    Clothing is the biggest thing I think you just have to experiment with and see what works for you. I appreciate how they basically say that everyone is different and not everything works for everybody. I have found my system over time, but there was a lot of trial and error there. This info could get you started down that path with a lot less expirementation.

    Two complaints: No love for cyclocross bikes as an option, and they claim that changing a rear tire can be made more difficult by having disc brakes. What?
    Last edited by CommuterBoy; 11-09-2009 at 10:11 AM.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    Two complaints: No love for cyclocross bikes as an option, and they claim that changing a rear tire can be made more difficult by having disc brakes. What?
    I agree on the rear tire issue with discs, if anything it's a lot easier. I find my canti's just a pain in the ass when getting tire adjustments done.

    pink

  4. #4
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    Boy I feel lucky to live in the bay area. Half the content is geared towards a commuter riding in the snow! Props for doing that, but harder to do. As in hard bitter cold extremities!
    Creator Producer: Will of the Sun WoS, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 1M+ MTBR thread

  5. #5
    a lazy pedaler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57
    I agree on the rear tire issue with discs, if anything it's a lot easier. I find my canti's just a pain in the ass when getting tire adjustments done.

    pink
    I think they were talking about a Pugsley...to remove the rear wheel you have to get loose the brake caliper..as I understood...I'm building one.

  6. #6
    Bedwards Of The West
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    ^^ Why?

    On a pugsley with disc brakes you have to move the caliper to get the wheel off? That's unpossible. Really?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  7. #7
    a lazy pedaler
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    right now I couldn't find exactly why..but here, second post...the guy sound pretty sure about it...(I know i read it somewhere too)

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=570137

  8. #8
    a lazy pedaler
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    now I remember...Pugs has a horizontal dropout...not vertical...so in order to pull back the wheel you need to get loose the brake caliper

  9. #9
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    ^^ aaahhh

    so you have to pivot the caliper up a bit to slide the rotor out from underneath it. Makes sense. Still a design flaw. Couldn't they angle the dropout slightly down so that it wasn't an issue? You'd still have the chain-tightening properties of a horizontal dropout, but a slight downward angle as you pulled the wheel out to clear the caliper. Seems like it would work to me.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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