Winter is approaching- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Winter is approaching

    But here in Austin, 40F is the typical cold day.

    As I have just started commuting and I only have ~20-25min commute on flat urban streets, what are your recommendations?

    When I bike on the trails in the 50's I typically wear shorts, base layer, short sleeve jersey and a sleeveless vest (to break the wind). If it is in the 40's I either swap the short sleev jersey for a long sleeve or add arm warmers.

    And the head is the most important, always have something on my head under my helmet.

    I am trying to minimize the amount of clothing but keep warm. Biggest concern is too many layers = too much sweat.

    I definitely need a recommendation on a good high visibility vest as well.
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  2. #2
    Moderator Moderator
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    Some knickers and/or kneewarmers would be good for those temps. The kneewarmers are especially handy on days where it will warm up, like yesterday here when it went from 40 in the morning to 70F in the evening. You can just put them in your bag if you don't need them.

  3. #3
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
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    ^^ Ditto. I use full length legwarmers and shorts, so I can ditch them on the warmer ride home. 40*F is perfect riding weather, you should be thankful you don't actually have winter.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  4. #4
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    The key is blocking the wind without too much insulation and still allowing your clothes to breath. Personally when it's 40-45 I would wear the following:

    -Thin wind resistant tights
    -Thin long sleeve base layer, generally synthetic, if it's cooler merino wool
    -Thin jacket with venting options. I use a Pearl Izumi Elite Barrier jacket, the sleeves zip off so if I get too warm I can turn it into a vest
    -Wind proof headband. I get too hot with a hat, but want to keep my ears warm
    -Soft shell gloves. They're wind resistant but still breath

    As Les Stroud says, "You sweat, you die"

  5. #5
    Short-Change-Hero
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    ^^ Agree with the others. Another thing you can look at is Merino wool base layers (if you dont have them already) very lightweight but durable soft wool fabric that is great for cooler riding. We have been in the 40s the last week or so when I am leaving for work and so far the worst I have had to do is add my arm warmers. Normally until the low 40s your legs are moving enough that they should be keeping themselves warm, rest is lightweight, windbreaking materials to keep the breeze out.

  6. #6
    since 4/10/2009
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    Knee warmers have been my go-to winter leg coverings in Texas.

    for my upper body, I typically go with the long-sleeved baselayer shirt and a thin breathable jacket. My favorite is an EMS Windstopper N2S jacket. It's just breathable enough to keep the sweat down yet just thick enough to warm me up.

    where I live a few hours east of you, we usually do get sub-freezing morning temps for a couple weeks and I need a little more warmth than that so I upgrade to a slightly warmer softshell jacket, softshell gloves, a Buff for a headcovering (maybe a fleece headband for my ears if it's windy), and I'll throw on my rain pants for wind blocking.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    EMS Windstopper N2S jacket..
    Nice to see people outside of the northeast buying from EMS. It's a great store, I have multiple locations near me and shop there regularly. Their brand of both technical and casual clothing is really nice and well priced.

  8. #8
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Straz85 View Post
    Nice to see people outside of the northeast buying from EMS. It's a great store, I have multiple locations near me and shop there regularly. Their brand of both technical and casual clothing is really nice and well priced.
    I bought mine in Pittsburgh just before the last Pgh location closed. technically in the northeast. :-) I worked there and paid $12 for a $125 jacket. someone returned it after a couple years....complete with the tags still attached and a receipt, never worn. it had been discontinued for a couple years. I think they even bought it off the clearance rack.

    I still have a few items of EMS tech gear and it's great. The schoeller gaiters I have are almost magic in their waterproofness.

  9. #9
    weirdo
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    Huh. Because of the comments I draw when I wear long johns under shorts, I thought I was the only one who did that. I guess my co-workers are all just cave men. I have nothing to add to the warm clothes suggestions, but since you commute on flat streets, hopefully you can take it easy if you overdress to help keep from drowning in sweat. Also be sure to have a way of carrying the extra stuff home if its warmer after work than on your way in.

    For high vis vests, ask people on the road crews where they buy their stuff next time you pass a construction site that isn`t busy or see the crew in a convenience store. I get mine from a local saftey suply place that mostly caters to industrial companies so I can check it out in person and decide what looks best- they never seem to have the same ones twop years in a row, so its a new decision every time. Personally, I like oversized mesh vests that will fit over anything I might happen to wear underneath it, but that does present a "sail" problem sometimes. And I suspect that solid material keeps its color longer than mesh too, but I`m willing to replace more often in order to keep the ventilation.

  10. #10
    ~ B A D A S S ~
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    I got wool.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

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