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  1. #1
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    windshield

    HI,

    this will sound weird but.
    anyone ever used a winshield for winter commuting.

    its getting quite cold theses days and i have a hardtime finding a good combo of clothing...

    my commute is about 1h, the first half i'm ok and on the second half i freeze from the wind i'm generating while i ride and the sweat i had from the first half of my ride(i sweat a lot)

    i dont get that problem riding my mtb in the trails as speeds are slower...
    i'm thinking that cutting a bit of the wind in front of me would help..i know a windshield was helping a lot when i was riding ATV'S during winter time

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I saw a guy with one the other day.

    My instinct is that it wouldn't help very much, at least not for your sides or your back, and it would slow you down a lot.

    I start wearing a windbreaker over a short-sleeved jersey before I add a long-sleeved jersey. If I have to layer more, I like to emphasize my core (like a fleece vest, maybe) over my arms. I don't know if that's any different from what you're already doing.

    Tights/knee warmers, wool socks, warm gloves, and a fleece cycling cap if it's around freezing are also on the list.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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    I've never even seen one, but I think it would make handling tricky in a wind. I have one spot with an open field & crosswinds, and last winter I noticed the handling difference from just adding a wider front fender. Try to get less sweaty on the 1st half, either by slowing down or not zipping up, not wearing a hat, etc. Once you are sweaty it is very hard to stay warm, unless the rest of the ride is uphill.

  4. #4
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    I assume you are avoiding cotton which gets wet then cold and doesn't wick worth anything. Wool is best, I am allergic so I have to go with silk and manmade blends. That was the first step in getting much warmer: NO tee shirts. Many light breathable wicking layers. You see the temps and winds and say looks like a seven layer morning. Head hands, feet, and core body, about in that order. if they are cold, you feel cold.

    I have seen a NYC commuter bike on a blog but it is gone now, with a windbreaker shield in front of the handlebars to cut down on wind on the hands. I assume he had trouble riding with enough gloves to keep his hands warm and still use brakes and shifters, or has arthritis or the cold hand syndrome thing, I forget the name. I had it bad until I discoverd the foods that messed me up.

    Bubble windshields are effective on recumbents because they don't need to be anywhere near as large and can get a good flow up and over or around the sides.

    My errand bike has about the area of a windshield. There's no way I'd want to push that into the wind for an hour, less that 10 miles round trip is plenty, thanks.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    I have seen a NYC commuter bike on a blog but it is gone now, with a windbreaker shield in front of the handlebars to cut down on wind on the hands. I assume he had trouble riding with enough gloves to keep his hands warm and still use brakes and shifters, or has arthritis or the cold hand syndrome thing, I forget the name. I had it bad until I discoverd the foods that messed me up.
    Pogies.



    I think it'd have to be about 20 degrees for me to want them. Then I'd really, really want them, and be really thankful to have them. (Or miserable, depending.)
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  6. #6
    weirdo
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    I haven`t used one or seen one, but I`ve fantasized about them too. If you try it, I`ll be very interrested to see it and hear about it. Wind/handling/speed will probably suffer, as mentioned above, but I`m not completely sure about that. B Mc beat me to the recumbent reference- not really apples to apples, but most windshield reports I read on the bent forums claim a slight improvement in speed and handling and a definite increase in comfort. I don`t think the frontal area is as much a difference between `bents and diamond frames (they come in different sizes for bents and could potentially be different sizes for DFs) as the wheelbase. I`m not sure about that either, but as long as we`re in Speculationland...

    I never tried pogies either, but they REALLY look like a winner (winter?) idea. Anybody ever make a set for drop bars?
    Recalculating....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    I haven`t used one or seen one, but I`ve fantasized about them too. If you try it, I`ll be very interrested to see it and hear about it. Wind/handling/speed will probably suffer, as mentioned above, but I`m not completely sure about that. B Mc beat me to the recumbent reference- not really apples to apples, but most windshield reports I read on the bent forums claim a slight improvement in speed and handling and a definite increase in comfort. I don`t think the frontal area is as much a difference between `bents and diamond frames (they come in different sizes for bents and could potentially be different sizes for DFs) as the wheelbase. I`m not sure about that either, but as long as we`re in Speculationland...

    I never tried pogies either, but they REALLY look like a winner (winter?) idea. Anybody ever make a set for drop bars?
    I personnaly doubt that speed will suffer. a winshield have a shape that will defect wind compared to your body that will catch up wind..

    my idea is to find a cheap scooter windshield and give it a try...the bike specific windshield are just too expensive(worth more than my winter bike!)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    ...I never tried pogies either, but they REALLY look like a winner (winter?) idea. Anybody ever make a set for drop bars?
    I haven't tried 'em either, but saw the$e at
    http://www.trails-edge.com/retail/te...mfbikemits.htm

    One reason I have not tried them is your hands would freeze off the bike - waiting for bus, fixing something, etc., unless you carried other gloves.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tartosuc
    I personnaly doubt that speed will suffer. a winshield have a shape that will defect wind compared to your body that will catch up wind..

    my idea is to find a cheap scooter windshield and give it a try...the bike specific windshield are just too expensive(worth more than my winter bike!)
    I will be interested in your report back. Good luck!

  10. #10
    viva la v-brakes!
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    Poagies are great, I won't ride in the winter without them. My wife and I both run the AMF threadworks poagies. She commutes through the entire winter here in Madison with them, I.... work at home now.

    Another great product is the Warm Front: http://www.thewarmfront.com/main.html

    Wear it under your windbreaker layer, and its easy to pull off once you get warmed up.
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  11. #11
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    The warmfront does look like a good idea - too bad the online source is charging $12 to ship a $25 item from an adjacent state. It's made out of fleece & is small enough to fit in a jersey pocket for goodness sakes!

  12. #12
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    it would not be hard to buy a fleece shirt at Goodwill, cut it to the desired size and shape and cut the collar and insert velcro. It would be 90% as good, not as fashionable, but its not a layer anyone really sees anyway.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer
    I haven't tried 'em either, but saw the$e at
    http://www.trails-edge.com/retail/te...mfbikemits.htm

    One reason I have not tried them is your hands would freeze off the bike - waiting for bus, fixing something, etc., unless you carried other gloves.
    Where do I put my mirror?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473
    it would not be hard to buy a fleece shirt at Goodwill, cut it to the desired size and shape and cut the collar and insert velcro. It would be 90% as good, not as fashionable, but its not a layer anyone really sees anyway.
    Good idea

  15. #15
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    What biking I got in last winter was below 20F until late February. The winter before I rode my coldest ride at -5 (without the wind chill factored in). The week link is that my old Maine Hunting boots thermal linings don't keep the feeet as toasty as they once did. The return half hour got progressively less comfortable on the feet. Like I'd gotten snow down my boots.

    The NYC guy did not have pogies, but what looked like ten inch high panels mounted about a mitted hand thickness ahead of the bars, just stopping the wind on the hands.

    Maybe I need Pogies for the pedals. The neoprene booties for cycling shoes are good to about 35F for me.
    Last edited by BrianMc; 10-15-2010 at 06:39 PM.

  16. #16
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    Thanks, Xplorer! They sure are big, but I guess that`s kind of the point. I did my first sewing job recently and enjoyed it- SuperPogies just might be my next project.

    Cold hands when you take your hands out of the mitts wouldn`t be that much of an issue, I don`t think. Aren`t they made to wear gloves inside, just not so heavy as the gloves you`d need without the overmitts? When you aren`t riding, you won`t have the wind, so shouldn`t need as much glove.

    Re: Pogies for the pedals
    I hate to keep bringing recumbents into the threads, really I`m not a total benthead, and hope I don`t ever get to the preaching stage, but this is one of the areas that make most sense to go that way. Some of those off the rack fairing/windshield combos are absolutely huge. And the more "bikini" styled ones actually amount to "pogies for the pedals".
    Recalculating....

  17. #17
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    I guess Pogies for bars or pedals are mini windshield so OT with OP first post.

    So Rodar, can you point me in the right direction, as I assume they aren't called pogies for pedals? Santa may need to know! I'm trying to be good!

  18. #18
    weirdo
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    Mueller Windwrap Footsie Pogerizer:

    https://www.utahtrikes.com/PRODINFO-...T_Fairing.html

    Same product, but used on a DF roadbike, scroll down to the post. Includes picture and short, but interresting review of that special use and the intended use.
    https://www.mplsbikelove.com/forum/v...php?f=7&t=4199

    Silghtly cheaper, but still expensive ZZipper windshields and fairings intended for upright bikes:
    https://www.zzipper.com/Products/prod_upright.php

    Some adaptation required:
    https://www.amazon.com/Swisher-Winds...=pd_sbs_auto_3
    NOW we`re talking reasonable prices!

    EDIT: Further Googling indicates that Tartosuc was on the right track with the scooter stuff, budgetwise. They don`t seem to have the hand protection that ATV/snowmobile fairings have, though- don`t know if that`s good or bad.
    Last edited by rodar y rodar; 10-15-2010 at 09:11 PM.
    Recalculating....

  19. #19
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    Thanks Rodar. Search time expands rapidly when you don't know the best key words!

    I have 'college' double sided pedals on one bike and classic Campy Rattraps on the other so I have old fashioned clip mounting points. Since last time I checked, my feet didn't need to see where they are going, I don't need expensive clear shields on the pedals. That opens the door for some Yankee ingenuity/DIY. That would cost less that replacing the hiking boots. Trick will be making it look decent. Dorky, unfortunately, is a given, but layered up and riding at 15* F, I need to embrace the dorkiness!

    The claims of 2+ mph on an already recumbent and more aero trike is interesting. I agree that at $100 or less it is worth a try, at 2 to 3 times that it must work very well and mount beautifully with a long list of 5 star reviews.

  20. #20
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Since last time I checked, my feet didn't need to see where they are going, I don't need expensive clear shields on the pedals. That opens the door for some Yankee ingenuity/DIY. That would cost less that replacing the hiking boots. Trick will be making it look decent. Dorky, unfortunately, is a given, but layered up and riding at 15* F, I need to embrace the dorkiness!
    That pretty well sums up my train of thought last night. I got to thinking about some thick (~1mm) black plastic sheets that we use as pallet slips at work with aluminum braces from about the bottom of my bars up to around chin height while riding upright. Plenty dorky to be sure! Got pretty excited until I did a quick mental review of projects half done or not even off the ground yet, and now I figure I`d better not even go there. Not this year, anyway.

    "The claims of 2+ mph on an already recumbent and more aero trike is interesting."
    I`ve heard both ways- that it signifigantly helps speed and that it doesn`t help speed to any noticeable extent. I`m inclined to believe, at least for front fairings on any bikes with naked behinds, that most of the speed benies are imaginary. For a bike that`s already streamlined in back, probably more likely. On the other hand, I`ve heard very few beardsters complain about handling in crosswinds with only front fairings, and most are very happy with the Winter comfort gains. I would guess that would apply pretty similarly to utility/commute (Big Boned ) wedgies.
    Recalculating....

  21. #21
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    With the wind on the rear 90 degree quadrant it would be a second sail to your body, like adding a mast to a schooner, so speed gains might NOT be only from frontal 90 degree winds. Mostly side winds strong enough could make a real job of staying straight which is essential with cars passing at 40-50 mph closing speed only a few feet away, not to mention the rumble strip not being a good ride even with larger lower pressure tires. Also mean speeds come into play if I am running 14-16 mph into 10-20+ mph winds in the frontal quarter, air speed is in the mid twenties pushing with gusts over 40. Then a bit of aero could have a very good effect. If I am doing only 12-14 normally and 8-10 or less into the wind, the effect is going to be marginal. Likely those guys don't ride much above 10 mph winds. So there goes the effect without even considering their routes and usual wind directions, they simply don't ride when the effect will be larger. It would be an interesting High School Science project looking at this in detail and establishing the zone of operation where they are effective to very effective with differnt bike orientations.

  22. #22
    viva la v-brakes!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    That opens the door for some Yankee ingenuity/DIY. That would cost less that replacing the hiking boots. Trick will be making it look decent. Dorky, unfortunately, is a given, but layered up and riding at 15* F, I need to embrace the dorkiness!
    For the feet get some extra large toe clips and make foot covers of them with duct tape.

    For the hands, I have seen people make poagies out of gallon jugs, I think the antifreeze type work best.
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  23. #23
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    Geez get a good pair of mitts and some winter boots....you chould be good to -35 C for an hour or so. That is -35 C without wind chill.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tartosuc
    my commute is about 1h, the first half i'm ok and on the second half i freeze from the wind i'm generating while i ride and the sweat i had from the first half of my ride(i sweat a lot)
    You might try not dressing in such warm clothes or adjusting your clothes to let some heat out as you start. If you get your sweat level down, you might stay warmer.

  25. #25
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    Gloves. I am covered. Multiple layers work there too. Though if I could shield and drop a layer that would be nice.

    Boots. I am not in Calgary nor Ottawa, Canada where periods of -40* C or F (scales cross there) occur. The ones I had from my time in Ottawa are long since history. You are hard pressed to find anything here in stores that is good to -20 * C, about -4 * F. I prefer to try things on and not mail ordering and returning until I get something I like. A trip to get boots and visit relatives in Ottawa is not in the cards. Cold spells are of pretty short duration and a removable wind screen would allow a nicer more expensive pair of boots rather than two pair. Or a pair I have to add and remove liners from. Hence plan B.

    Please Jeff, give us some credit that we have our reasons, and not your exact situation. I am happy that your gloves and boots work well for you.

  26. #26
    weirdo
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    Getting cheaper...

    I just found a selection of used farings on the website of a major recumbent dealer in Colorado. Scroll waaay down below all the used bikes, past the wheels and seats, to the fairing department.
    http://www.cycledifferent.com/oldsite/trades.htm
    The $50 "wedgie" (benttalk for diamond frame bikes) model and the larger $80 SWB model look very tempting, but I`d better pass. Still, if anybody was serious about trying a windshield, maybe one of these would float your boat.
    Recalculating....

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Gloves. I am covered. Multiple layers work there too. Though if I could shield and drop a layer that would be nice.

    Boots. I am not in Calgary nor Ottawa, Canada where periods of -40* C or F (scales cross there) occur. The ones I had from my time in Ottawa are long since history. You are hard pressed to find anything here in stores that is good to -20 * C, about -4 * F. I prefer to try things on and not mail ordering and returning until I get something I like. A trip to get boots and visit relatives in Ottawa is not in the cards. Cold spells are of pretty short duration and a removable wind screen would allow a nicer more expensive pair of boots rather than two pair. Or a pair I have to add and remove liners from. Hence plan B.

    Please Jeff, give us some credit that we have our reasons, and not your exact situation. I am happy that your gloves and boots work well for you.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...d+Shoe+09.aspx

    They actually are really good MTB boots...

  28. #28
    weirdo
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    And what a bargain at only three times the price of that used windshield!
    Recalculating....

  29. #29
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    I would settle for a face shield. Cold air makes my eyes tear and during the summer it might keep the pollen out of my face.

    Anyone try neoprene gloves?

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by GambJoe
    I would settle for a face shield. Cold air makes my eyes tear and during the summer it might keep the pollen out of my face.
    The one advantage of being legally blind without glasses: I CAN'T leave home without them. Can't find the bike! I need the belaklava to reduce ice over of my lenses around the low teens F and -teens C. I assume a full face shield would be hoarfrosted into invisibility in a few miles but haven't tried one. I still get some pollen, some grit, and some eye sting with crosswinds blowing studff behind the lenses. Safety glasses meant to cover regular eyewear are something I am going to try especialy with tree pollen.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by GambJoe
    I would settle for a face shield. Cold air makes my eyes tear and during the summer it might keep the pollen out of my face.

    Anyone try neoprene gloves?
    I have the Glacier Glove Neoprene gloves. I have mixed feelings about them on my 12 miles each way commute. My biggest challenge is I start off in the morning from my house with about 10 minutes of 20-30mph downhill, with no warmup. I must say the neoprene gloves are decent at cutting the wind. But then I start cranking on the flatland miles. And they vary from sweaty to to freezing below 38degF.
    And then I get to work and have gloves that reek of sweaty neoprene.... this is not a pleasant odor.

    I have found some things that help. I use very thin polypro glove liners under the gloves, which I find adds about -5 degree extra range to ANY glove, but you need slightly oversize gloves for it to work. And a real assist I have in the Northwest where its around freezing in the morning and 40-50degF in the evening most of the winter, is to have electric "boot dryer" at home AND work. I have the forced air type that dry a pair of boots and a pair of gloves all at once.
    Live in the moment.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus
    You might try not dressing in such warm clothes or adjusting your clothes to let some heat out as you start. If you get your sweat level down, you might stay warmer.

    I tried it all and i could not find a good combination yet... in all my winter outdoor activities(snowshooing, snowboarding, snowscoot, ski joring) i dont have a problem finding good cloth combination.

    Biking gives me more problem.: I either freeze caus i'm not dress enough or get too warm and then freeze...all beaucause of the winds involves with biking...my main problem is that I sweat a lot, even when cold... I sweat no matther what..usually on any normal activities moving more keeps me warm...biking get me the reverse result due to the wing i generate.

    for my feet i think i found a good solution, i bougt some gore tex booties,xl sized that fits over my hiking boots that i use for snowshooing..cut the wind pretty good..

    Now i'm trying to resolve hands and upper body. I'm not all settle on the windshield idea yet.. i'm still trying to combine clothes that would work

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