what's a better bike...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    what's a better bike...

    so I've been looking for a good commuter bike with a 3, 7 or 8 speed internal hub.
    I came across these 2 and am looking for some feedback on which you guys prefer, or maybe you know another similar bike with an internal hub that you recommend:
    trek waubesa. priced at around $730
    kona dr good. priced around 790 (on sale at LBS for $650)
    thanks

  2. #2
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
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    I like the Trek due to its dropouts, 8 speed vs. 7, and no roller brake. I don't ride in wet conditions though, so I'm fine with v-brakes. If you ride in the rain, the disc on the Dr. Good may be preferable. If you can though, you should test ride both - fit is more important than anything else.


    I just bought two Swobo bikes on closeout from bonktown.com. I am very impressed with their quality for the price, and highly recommend them. They make a bunch of commuter bikes with different features (such as internal hubs, disc brakes, etc.) The only problem is that they were bought out by Santa Cruz, and now it's hard to find their products.

    We got the Swobo Baxter (Aluminum frame, 700c, disc brakes, 8 speed internal hub, tons of features) for $550 on bonktown for the girlfriend - unfortunately it's a very small size, and won't work for most people. I picked up the Heywood (beefy frame, 26" wheels, disc, single speed) for $299. Awesome bikes.

  3. #3
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    They both look like great bikes, so try them out and if one feels better than another then it's an easy decision. Personally I like the look of the Trek better, though. If you get the Trek I recommend upgrading the brake pads with some KoolStop pads.

  4. #4
    Swedetarded
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    Scott Sub 35. If I wasn't so happy with my Jamis, I would probably buy a Sub10.

  5. #5
    Still want a fat bike....
    Reputation: Dalton's Avatar
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    I don't think there is a "right" answer to the question. Just like jsilva said, try them both and see which one fits better. There are tons of options out there right now for commuters. I don't know about pricing, but Raleigh just came out with their 2012 lineup and they have probably more than 10 bikes that a commuter would love in what I can only guess is a large range of prices.

    That said, I love the Kona and have often thought about getting one, but I think I am going to go spend a few more bucks and build up a Surly Ogre when they hit the shelves in December.

    What kind of commute do you have? All road? Sidewalks? Bike Path? Trails? Right now I am riding a Trek Soho S with 700c x 28 tires and even though I am on all roads, I am going to go to a 29er with higher volume tires because I am in Michigan and the roads suck and might as well be dirt trails. Thought I would be good with the smaller tires, but I don't really like it.

    Things to think about.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalton View Post
    I don't think there is a "right" answer to the question. Just like jsilva said, try them both and see which one fits better. There are tons of options out there right now for commuters. I don't know about pricing, but Raleigh just came out with their 2012 lineup and they have probably more than 10 bikes that a commuter would love in what I can only guess is a large range of prices.

    That said, I love the Kona and have often thought about getting one, but I think I am going to go spend a few more bucks and build up a Surly Ogre when they hit the shelves in December.

    What kind of commute do you have? All road? Sidewalks? Bike Path? Trails? Right now I am riding a Trek Soho S with 700c x 28 tires and even though I am on all roads, I am going to go to a 29er with higher volume tires because I am in Michigan and the roads suck and might as well be dirt trails. Thought I would be good with the smaller tires, but I don't really like it.

    Things to think about.

    commute will be about 12 miles round trip, may go for longer rides sometimes. I live in NYC, will be riding strictly pavement but the roads suck around here. I test rode that trek soho s yesterday, and yeh, the tires are too thin.
    the LBS told me yesterday that the internal hubs are nice, but they are very tough to work on and if I damage a wheel, it wil be $250 to replace. I'm wondering now if I should be looking at 21/24 speeds (easier to work on), or perhaps a single speed. and he also suggested something with front suspension like the giant roam or specialized crosstrail. this is all so confusing for a newbie. what do you guys think?

  7. #7
    Still want a fat bike....
    Reputation: Dalton's Avatar
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    I think that if you're in the city and you don't plan to ride dirt ever on that bike, you don't need suspension. It might be nice for hopping curbs or something, but you don't really need it. I put suspension on MY "nice to have" list and not my "must have" list.

    As for the LBS talking internal, I think they are kinda full of it. Of course if something fails inside the IGH, then it may have to be sent away, but if you damage the rim, you can always have that hub re-laced into something else. I think my LBS will lace a wheel for like $40 or $50 (though I could be wrong).

    I don't know ultimately for you, but my build when I do it will be an internally geared hub and if I have problems I will just treat it as a learning experience and deal. I haven't really heard of any of the Alfine or Nexus hubs being a huge pile of **** or anything, so I will trust the brand and roll one to see what happens. I am thinking that the IGH will be nice in the winter as there is nothing to get gunked up if I ride in the snow. Do you plan to ride in bad weather?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalton View Post
    I think that if you're in the city and you don't plan to ride dirt ever on that bike, you don't need suspension. It might be nice for hopping curbs or something, but you don't really need it. I put suspension on MY "nice to have" list and not my "must have" list.

    As for the LBS talking internal, I think they are kinda full of it. Of course if something fails inside the IGH, then it may have to be sent away, but if you damage the rim, you can always have that hub re-laced into something else. I think my LBS will lace a wheel for like $40 or $50 (though I could be wrong).

    I don't know ultimately for you, but my build when I do it will be an internally geared hub and if I have problems I will just treat it as a learning experience and deal. I haven't really heard of any of the Alfine or Nexus hubs being a huge pile of **** or anything, so I will trust the brand and roll one to see what happens. I am thinking that the IGH will be nice in the winter as there is nothing to get gunked up if I ride in the snow. Do you plan to ride in bad weather?

    don't plan on riding in bad weather, but one never knows.
    I think you are right about suspension, especially since I've read that most of these entry level hardtails have cheap front suspension anyway.
    can fatter tires be put on that kona or waubesa with the IGH? the only bikes I've seen with the IGH have kinda skinny tires, which I don't like.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kochise View Post
    don't plan on riding in bad weather, but one never knows.
    I think you are right about suspension, especially since I've read that most of these entry level hardtails have cheap front suspension anyway.
    can fatter tires be put on that kona or waubesa with the IGH? the only bikes I've seen with the IGH have kinda skinny tires, which I don't like.
    You can run an IGH on any wheel with any tire.

    Most "hybrid" type urban commuters will be optimized for 28-32mm tires. Some might allow you to squeeze up to a 38mm in back and 42-45mm up front (depending on the fork design).

    I've commuted on 23, 25, 28, 32, 38, 50 and 60mm tires (Big apple), and I by far prefer the larger tires for all conditions, all roads. That said, there are some 32-35mm tires that are designed for comfort (Panaracer Pasela TG, for example) that can take the sting out of riding on moderate width tires. Some 32's ride just as harsh as 23's.

    IMO start with a full rigid SS 29er, slap on some 2.0 or 2.3 slicks and an H-bar or Mary (much more comfy than a flat or riser bar IMO).
    Then, save up $350 or so, build up an Alfine 8 wheel and convert the bike (very easy to do on a SS frame).

    Don't let the bike shop's own fear/ignorance of IGH's steer you away.

    If you are able to increase your budget at bit, a whole world of options opens up.

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