What was your greatest roadside jerry-rig?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What was your greatest jury-rig? [was roadside jerry-rig]

    So I was starting my homeward-bound commute with my coworker, let's call him Queasy, when suddenly, going forward on a green light, his chain ring popped off. His maintenance routine consists solely of leaving his bike outside, so this came as no surprise. Looks like he had been loosing chain-ring bolts one at a time, and the last one gave out yesterday. But we were able to get him home (the last bolt in the picture has no back)...



    So now for the purpose of this thread...

    What was the pinnacle of your MacGyvering?

    Do tell, and pictures would be most welcome!
    Last edited by cleo; 08-26-2010 at 08:47 AM.

  2. #2
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    That's a good one!...I think the best one I had was trailside...my ATAC pedal body popped off, still attached to my shoe, and the pedal axle was still attached to the crank...I used a rock and a multi-tool to reattach the C-clip you are supposed to have those specialized spreader pliers for, and I was rolling again.

  3. #3
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    Quality fix!
    Mine have been few and far between. I can remember taking an OTB once and bending up my brake levers pretty bad. I slid the seat post over the levers and brought them back as best I could. They had a little twist to them but at least they were positioned straight.

  4. #4
    weirdo
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    Very slick, Cleo.
    The only noteable trailside fix that comes to mind for me was straightening a bent derailler hanger with a small Crescent wrench. Not as impressive as your zip tied chainring by any means.
    Recalculating....

  5. #5
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    In New Zealand, busted a rear driveside spoke (two actually). I zig-zagged a longer spoke; right length mid zig weaving in after snipping old ones out. Old tourer fix, and it worked.

    Couple of stripped hubs fixed lacing toe straps thru cassette and certain spokes- any spokes. Worked/rode outta a few Moab trip/rides w guests.

  6. #6
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I stuffed a flat tire full of pine needles and leaves... felt like about 18 psi but it got me home.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  7. #7
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    I patched a sidewall tire blowout with a dollar bill once.

  8. #8
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    I think the term is 'jury-rigged', but I may be mistaken.

    Semi-tortilla-ed a rim off the edge of 8" of tarmac. Did the remove wheel stand on rim, check fit, repeat trick to approximate a true rim. Front rim brake acted like a car disk with a lot of warp, but it got me home. Removed the rim got it close to round and flat and remounted it. Good 27" rims were not available as replacements.

    Also did the boot with a dollar bill trick after a piece of beer bottle cut 1/4 in in the sidewall of a tire with two rides on it, and I got home where I booted it with a tire patch and moved it to the rear wheel.

    Both rim and tire retired with about 2 thousand more miles when I went to new 700C wheels in June.

    As kids with no money and a Dad who would forget to get our bike parts when in town, we patched tires and tubes until the patches interfered with new patches, using up his tire patching kits. We carried friction tape used for hockey sticks for many other purposes and wrapped it around rim and tire to deal with tubes emerging from sidewall splits of tires he promised to replace. We reapplied when the tape wore through at the tread and started to let go. When Dad saw his tape supply being used up this way, he bought the new tires he promised. Dad wasn't stupid in any way, just not too motivated to remember to add our stuff to his shopping list. He taught us well.

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    I haven't had any interesting ones myself. But the best one I've seen was a bike where the freehub got entirely too free during a trail ride. They undid a spoke from the rim and threaded it through the cassette to let the guy ride home, taking the easy way out.

  10. #10
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    I ride BMX quite a bit as well as mountain biking. I was riding with some friends and someone had a flat tire. We removed the tube and found the small puncture hole. We cut the tube in half through the puncture. We then tied the open ends of the tube together really tight and installed it into the tire. It held air long enough to get home! I have also had a flat on my BMX bike and used a 26in. tube in it, folded over in one spot.
    My motorcycle runs on infant blood

  11. #11
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    Twice i've had to fix chains without quick links by pressing a pin out and then pressing it back in with a chain tool. It's a pretty tedious job.

  12. #12
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I have two on my most recent build- a cheap as you can cross bike:

    1) On a bike designed for downtube shifters, I used bar ends, and eventually the housing pulled through the stop I had ad hoc'ed. I found a can tab, pulled it off, pinched around the cable and I could shift again.

    2) The can tab eventually broke and I luckily found a hair pin to substitute for tension. Win. This might last a while....

  13. #13
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Wow, cannot beat the ziptied chainring…

    Anyhow, my best attempt at a jury-rig was using a couple green leaves from shrubs, and a found scrap of paper to reinforce a substantial split in a sidewall on a 120psi roadbike tire (gee, go figure, it was a Continental…the only company I’ve had REPEATED problems with on tire integrity in terms of failures non-related to punctures—going back to the year 1993!!!)… of course I had to replace the blown-out tube, but the leaves and that scrap of paper allowed me to make it the remaining 8 or 9 miles home.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  14. #14
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    Title change because...

    1st, I should have read my google further for the jerry-rig. The low down is:

    It is either "jury-rigged" or "jerry-built"...not "jerry-rigged"

    "Jury-rig" is finding (or constructing) a solution using materials at hand...often times it's an ingenious solution.

    "Jerry-built" is shoddy construction from the very beginning.

    It is from the nautical term "jury mast"...Which was as a temporary splint-like mast if the main mast has been damaged or lost.


    2nd, I'd love to see what creative solutions are out there on your daily ride.

    To get the ball rolling, I just completed one that kept an old LX crank alive:

    Took the chain rings off, dremeled the 44t off the removable spider (like I said, old LX), and tried to add a 38t as my only ring. It appears the spacing for the middle ring, between the bolt hole and the crank is not a standard width, so any non-Shimano LX circa 1996 ring will not fit. So, out with the dremel again, and off with the chain ramps on the old 32t ring, which I then used as a shim for the new 38t ring. Sucess!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What was your greatest roadside jerry-rig?-ring-shim.jpg  


  15. #15
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    was riding around on the lakeshore, run into a family with a couple kids stopped by the roadside. one kid's crying.
    department store bike, his rear derailleur had snapped one of it's link plates in two, removed, shortened chain, single speeded it for him.
    told him he'd need a new derailleur, just the one part was broken, it was easily replaced and the rest of bike was otherwise fine.
    (kids seem to think when one part's shot the whole assembly's gone, I wanted to make sure he understood that his BIKE was ok, just not that one part)

    the two boys sung me a "song of joy" in ukrainian (i think?!) to thank me for the work.
    never been sung to before, felt 10 feet tall for the rest of the day.
    not the most creative kludge I've done, but certainly the best.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  16. #16
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    ONe cold commute home in the dark...the pinch bolts loosened off and then both cranks fell off, into about 4 inches of fresh snow....

    I found every last bit and was able to reassemble the whole thing and ride on.

    Best trail fix, buddy broke his seat rail, we filed an end of the right side allen key and stuck it in the rail and managed to get the whole thing back togeather and working.

  17. #17
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    That rocks!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Combatcm
    Twice i've had to fix chains without quick links by pressing a pin out and then pressing it back in with a chain tool. It's a pretty tedious job.
    That was the stantard way to resize a chain for 100+ years. I still do it that way. Not into the quick link thing.
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  19. #19
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    ^^ I have the sram quick-links but somehow no one I ride with does, and I always wind up being the only guy with a chain tool (I carry a topeak alien II multitool...it weights 47 pounds and you could assemble an entire bike with it). I have done several trailside chain fixes, and I'm always grumbling about it It's never my bike.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  20. #20
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    Jury rig/ - yankee (canuck) Ingenuity

    Not many 144 mm BCD chainguards (old Campy and Track standard bolt pattern copied by Sugino in this 1972-3 edition originally with drilled black anodized chainwheels, worn and retired) so I modded a beat-up old 52 T sprocket and polished it up for my 1 x 9 commutter/errand bike fitted a NOS 42 I bought on sale about two decades ago because the size was no longer in production and I expected to need it one day:



    Hardly side of the trail, though. Rodar y rodar: note the Sugino crown. Yeah!

    Without the ready for a nice SS porteur rack from Velo-Orange (https://www.velo-orange.com/voporteurrack.html) , or a nice Chomo one from Cetma (https://cetmacargo.com/10%20CETMA%20...s%20index.htm), I cobbled this aluminum rack along with some scrap steel pieces I had on hand, to carry my computer case, a large cooler for frozen foods on shopping runs, or whatever. Legs go straight to the axle.



    I know the bars are 'wrong' but they clear the cooler. New levers, new saddle, and new bars and tape are on my want list. This is more Jerry-built that a jury rig and there is a reason that Porteur rack bikes often have a different trail than a touring frame. Forty five pounds is a handful that high in front. I have learned to carry more weigh low in panniers off the Wald rack in back and in panniers in front low and behind the axle, and that helps handling a lot. It has proven the concept and the Cetma in a matching blue would work great.

    Back from the Farmer's Market today. Note copper pipe extendion to reuse decent kickstand, foot is a wooden shaker style coat rack peg. It works. The 'panniers' were cheaper than the bungee cors and reflective tape used on them. The cooler was with us on our Honey moon 37 years ago this week. I have aa pie, two cakes, and some tomatoes in it. Panniers were close to full the cooler about 15%. Rode nicely.



    BTW originally a 27" 6 speed now converted to 700C with cheap ($75) wheelset and a SRAM 11-34 9 speed cassette, and wearing 35 mm Michelin City tires.

    According to another thread, it meets UCI (Union Cyclocommuterroiste Internationale) commuter standards: front and rear racks, full fenders, and lights front and back!
    Last edited by BrianMc; 08-28-2010 at 10:01 AM.

  21. #21
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    looks very great

  22. #22
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne
    That was the stantard way to resize a chain for 100+ years. I still do it that way. Not into the quick link thing.

    same here, the thing that is most important is the line up , if you dont line up the pin with the link just right you will tear a hole into the opposite outer plate and then you have a bad day
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  23. #23
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Rodar y rodar: note the Sugino crown. Yeah!
    Go get`em, Tiger! That baby is a beauty, way beyond the crown logo!
    Recalculating....

  24. #24
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    I want to help good drivers (who for the most part are neighbors) from making bad mistakes at my expense when I ride my nice bike. I am faster than they are expecting. I had the NiMH AAAs and the Planet Bike Super Flashes retired from straight back duty after mounting the Radbot1000s. The ligts aren't heavy, are of no use in my parts bin, so I decided to mount them to help side-on view. Sticking out from the stays was not good for wind resistance, walking near the bike or mounting it.



    Old mounting.

    So I devised an inboard mounting that qualifies for the 'creative solution' label the OP is now using for this thread.



    The mounts use bicycle inner tube shims to grasp a short piece of 1/2 " copper pipe. You can just see the end of it behind the light in the foreground.



    Uploaded with ImageShack.us

    A metal screw fastens a 1" copper pipe clamp (5 for $1 at Lowes) to the piece of copper pipe and the rest of the strap is contoured to fit the brake mount just ahead of the rear fender clip. Space is a bit tight for tightening the brake mount nut, though. The mount is springy allowing some movement if you push up against one of the lights. Copper color works with the Gold paint job, but I will paint it to match, otherwise it will tarnish to bronze then go verdegris over time.

  25. #25
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    I like that a lot. One of the challenges I've face with my own commuter is side lighting, which is not so great right now. I've got two amber Planet Earth blinkies that I've had mounted in various ways, but none of the techniques really worked in a satisfying manner. I will try a variation on your theme and see where it gets me.

  26. #26
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    i did that a few years back on a friends bike...derailleur caught on a branch and tore part of it...it worked for a month until my firend replaced the derailleur,
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What was your greatest roadside jerry-rig?-derailleur-patente.jpg  


  27. #27
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    pull-tie awesomeness!

  28. #28
    i also unicycle
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    i helped a buddy fix his canti front brake on a road bike tour with similar style of zip tie tomfoolery. amazed it lasted as long as it did (several hundred miles). think he broke a brake spring.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  29. #29
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I am not 100% sure this counts, but Sizzler and I got to the trailhead today to find out I had forgotten about pulling the top cap and screw early in the week. I tried to steal washers off road signs, but the ones I could get off were too small and the large ones I couldn't get off. The the brilliant man on the trip, Sizzler, pulled his Redline tugnut, took it apart, placed the tugnut across the top of the stem, screwed the tug screw into the starnut and were off.

    Fun?
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  30. #30
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Let's get a better look at my genius:
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  31. #31
    weirdo
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    That does look like a cool fix. But what the heck is a Redline tugnut?

    Also, is it bad news to ride one of those new style forks without the top cap? I didn`t think it mattered once the headset was adjusted.
    Recalculating....

  32. #32
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    Nice job. Canabalizing equipment to come up with something that can be done without to replace something essential and keep rolling is time honored on the farm and the field of battle. Well done.

    PS Shakedown rides nearer home are also a time-honored way to avoid the need to do so.

  33. #33
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    PS Shakedown rides nearer home are also a time-honored way to avoid the need to do so.
    It didn't need a shakedown ride- I just borrowed the screw and took off the top cap and forgot about it. I've been riding this bike in the same set up for four or five months.

    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    But what the heck is a Redline tugnut?

    Also, is it bad news to ride one of those new style forks without the top cap? I didn`t think it mattered once the headset was adjusted.
    The tug keeps the rear wheel axle back for good chain tension.

    It can be bad to ride without a top cap. The stem is the only thing keep things in place- if it slips out a little then you risk ruining your headset, ovalizing your head tube....

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    It didn't need a shakedown ride- I just borrowed the screw and took off the top cap and forgot about it. I've been riding this bike in the same set up for four or five months.....
    No, it didn't, did it?

    I too, have made a small change I forgot to reverse, or not done an adjustment I needed. It's being human. Usually I pick up on it fast so can return home to set it right. So I try to listen hard to the bike that first mile. I hate when it is 20 miles later. I guess this is why pilots have long checklists. More of an issue to forget something there. Both wings on? Check. Trying to borrow road sign hardware was cute. I have used wire cut out of a fence (before zip-ties).

  35. #35
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    Just last week my friend Al and I got to the trailhead after an hour's drive, unloaded the bikes, and discovered that I had, not one, but SIX inch-long slashes in the sidewall of the rear tire, from which the tube was bulging like little balloons. No spare tire, and since I don't have a car, these little outings are kind of precious to me. So we used one and a half patch kits (all the patches we had) on the inside of the tire, which didn't look like a very good fix. Then we cut the valve stem off a dead tube, and stuffed that tube in there on the slashed side, and put the good tube back and and re-inflated to 35 psi or so.

    It was still looking super hinky, but I really wanted to ride, so we gingerly set forth on a very rocky, technical 8-mile loop. It held like a champ, and we did the whole loop with no problems. The next day I took a look at the bike and the tube was bulging out in several NEW slashes!

    That was an old Michelin tire I got used for $3 out of a box at a bike shop. I guess I got my money's worth...

  36. #36
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    It can be bad to ride without a top cap. The stem is the only thing keep things in place- if it slips out a little then you risk ruining your headset, ovalizing your head tube....
    The stem bolts hold the stem/headset/fork package together ... not the top cap.

    The top cap is only used to set the tension. If the stem bolts are tight, you could also use the top cap and bolt to drag the star fangled nut out of the steerer tube.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

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