What are you packing?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 53 of 53
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001

    What are you packing?

    Half of the riders I see on a regular basis carry some sort of tool kit/assortment of tools, and half don't. Those who don't claim they don't need them, and those who do carry (myself included) say they are for the few times that disaster strikes (dramatic much?). So what do you pack, whether it's just going to work, a couple of laps on the single track, or bike packing across the continent? Here's mine;
    1)cheap Gerber multi-tool wanna be I bought for $10 at a truckstop, nameless adjustable wrench multi-tool I got at the same time, Avenir hex set I got for free from LBS after 1st tune-up, and Mini Mag-Lite.
    2)collapsed version of above, always stay in the saddle bag along with a rag and small bottle of chain lube
    3)Vuelta XRP multi-tool from BikesDirect (I replaced the original tire levers with steel spoons)
    4)14mm/15mm flat wrench I've had forever, Slime tire pressure gauge (good to 120psi), hodge-podge patch kit (Bell box is perfect size for patches, glue, extra spoons)
    5)collapsed version of 3&4 always stay in small tool bag on my bike.
    6) All my portable tools together.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What are you packing?-sunp0010.jpg  

    What are you packing?-sunp0011.jpg  

    What are you packing?-sunp0013.jpg  

    What are you packing?-sunp0014.jpg  

    What are you packing?-sunp0015.jpg  

    What are you packing?-sunp0016.jpg  

    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,451
    I carry:

    Topeak Alien II (overkill) multitool
    spare tube (3 out of 4 of my bikes are tubeless)
    tire levers
    presta/schrader adapter
    mini pump.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    I vary a little by bike.

    On my commute, I have an old stuff sack with a spare tube, a couple of tire levers, and a multi tool with hex keys and screw drivers. I throw that and my pump in my messenger bag.

    On the other bikes, the bike has a seat wedge with a couple tubes and a spare link for whatever size chain that bike has. My mountain bike also has a set of Pedro's tire levers, which are awesome and seem to be the only force in the universe capable of getting Schwalbe tubeless-ready tires off (and on!) my rims. I put my pump and a Topeak Hexus in my pocket.

    So less than you, but more than none.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,716
    I carry:
    multitool (crank bros I think)
    pump lezyne high volume
    park mt-1 (love this one, very handy,light, no unfolding etc.) see pic below
    mini leatherman, +/- 2" long (mostly for the minineedlenose pliers and occasionally the bottle opener)
    folding knife (+/- 4") for show and lunch mostly
    cheapo magnifier glasses (dang!, didn't used to need those for maps, fine repairs)
    spare tube
    3 tire levers
    tire boot
    stick-on patch kit
    phone
    camera
    mini 1st aid kit (so far only used for someone' s dog that got stung by a bee and a coworker with a cut)
    advil
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    363
    On my commuting bike (inside of a frame bag) I carry:
    BBB Multi-tool (which includes hex wrenches and screw drivers)
    2 Spare tubes
    2 Tire levers
    CO2 Inflator
    2 CO2 cartridges
    Universal flexible adapter (helpful in pumping up tires with mini/frame pumps)
    Presta valve adapter

    On the frame:
    Mini pump w/intergrated air guage

    On my person:
    I almost always have a folding pocket knife with me
    ↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → В А

  6. #6
    Unhinged Aussie on a 29er
    Reputation: hunter006's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    452
    Topeak Road Morph
    Crank Bros Multi Tool 19 - comes with a chain breaker on it.
    2 Spare Tubes
    2 Clif bars - I consider this appropriate to list because 1) it gets you out of sh*t when you're hungry and 2) the wrapper works well to boot a tire.
    2 Pedro tire levers, or 3 lesser tire levers.
    2 spare power links inside the patch kit box.
    Tire patch kit with glue AND glueless patches. Doesn't hurt to check the glue isn't dried out before I leave on a longer trip, but typically I don't really know whether it's got glue in there when I'm just commuting.
    A 1/16" cable lock with a padlock. A ski cable lock would work just as well; the idea is to deter anyone that would just walk away with the bike, and anyone with a set of pliers.
    If I remember, 2 triangle bandages but not much else in the first aid kit. 9 times out of 10 I've been able to use just triangle bandages and be ok. The other 1 time was a bee sting.
    A hatchet - it carries enough heft to use as a hammer, is sharp enough to use as a knife, obviously can cut wood but is small enough to fit in a pack.
    Petzl headlamp.
    Last edited by hunter006; 10-11-2012 at 07:40 PM.

  7. #7
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    The mini light is a good idea that I`ve gotten away from (lost one and never bothered to replace it). I`ve fixed one flat by streetlight and one by the light of my red blinky, switched to solid mode. If I ever had to actually find a hole that way I`d be SOL!

    On all my bikes, all the time:
    two tire spoons
    self adhesive patches (usualy only change the tube, repair at home with "regular" patches)
    one spare tube
    tire pump
    individual allen wrenches for the sizes needed on that bike

    For longer rides out of town or touring, I usually add a little extra, depending on the circumstances. "Extras" stuff usually incudes one more tube, master link, chain tool, spoke wrench, regular patch kit, sometimes small pair of pliers and/or small adjustable wrench, duct tape, zip ties.

    I always have a knife in my pocket too. Need to plug my favorite specimen: Spyderco Honeybee. It`s small, flat, and light enough that it doesn`t bounce against my leg when I ride, JUST big enough to be able to comfortably manupilate, very easy to open and close, cheap enough to replace when I inevitably lose one, made in China, but you`d never guess by looking at one or operating it. Will NOT work to scare off muggers
    Amazon.com: Spyderco HoneyBee SS PlainEdge Knife: Sports & Outdoors

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    112
    My Commuter
    2 Spare Tubes
    Duct tape
    2 CO2 cartridges and inflator
    2 Pedro tire levers,
    2 pairs nitrile gloves
    mini first aid kit
    knife - Benchmade CQC7
    mulit-tool
    A cliff bar or some equivalent and a couple of extra goos (in case I want to take the long way home)

    My MTB
    1 Spare Tube
    Duct tape
    2 CO2 cartridges and inflator
    hand pump
    2 Pedro tire levers,
    mini first aid kit including Toilet paper and a few baby wipes
    knife Benchmade CQC7
    mulit-tool (alien something or other. Basically a tool that allows me to fix just about anything in a pinch)
    Extra chain pins and a couple of extra links
    Extra water and some sort of food like cliff bar and goos
    cell phone

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    The only reason I didn't include my pocket knife in the list (3" CRKT) was 1) both multi-tools have knife blades in them, 2) I keep a razor blade in the patch kit, 3) like Rodar I always have my knife in my pocket with my keys. The zip ties are a good idea, there will be a few different sizes making their way into the tool bag on the bike tomorrow morn. I do keep a few different size band aids in my wallet from 2 butterfly size up to 1 extra large 4" band aid. They do come in handy and don't inflate my wallet at all.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,091
    Those who say they don't need to carry tools, tubes etc probably don't ride very much - every time I forget to bring a spare tube I get a puncture.
    I carry
    -Crank Bro's Multi tool - with chain breaker
    -Spare Power link
    -Spare tube
    -Tire levers
    -CO2 cylinder / inflator
    -Mini pump (which I hate using)
    -Spare light

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tzvia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    144
    Another Park MT-1 lover here. Carry one in the Camelback, on the road bike and in my Revelate Pika for commuting.

    Also carry a CB-17 tool, one shift cable, piece of water bottle for tire boot, two tubes, patch kit (with glue), micro tool with pliers, extra AA and AAA for blinkies, Pedros levers, a couple of zip ties, small bottle of sunscreen and small first aid kit. Also carry a presta to schrader adapter and some coins in case I have to resort to paying for air at the gas station. Pack it up neat and slide it all the way into the Pika, and a Blackburn pump (the new mini one with the retractable head and footpeg) are attached next to the water bottle cage.

    Now I am ready for the alien invasion. Almost forgot, my cell phone in case I still can't fix things using all the junk I am carrying.
    Tzvia.

  12. #12
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    8,365
    • spare tube
    • two patch kits
    • multi-tool (includes a spoke wrench and chain tool)
    • tire levers
    • couple of cable ties
    • piece of a fat cruiser tire sidewall for an emergency boot
    • first aid kit
    • house keys
    • identification
    • bit-o-money
    • tick removal tool
    • Kimber Pepperblaster II (I used to carry a Sig-Sauer Mosquito, but my route became safer when I changed jobs)
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    74
    General tools and pretty much everything you would think would be fine...

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: camekanix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    226
    Spare tube
    Patch kit
    Pump
    Leatherman
    Park multi tool
    Bandana (can be a bandage)
    Energy bar
    CZ-82 (depends on where & when I am riding)

  15. #15
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,716
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    The mini light is a good idea that I`ve gotten away from (lost one and never bothered to replace it). I`ve fixed one flat by streetlight and one by the light of my red blinky, switched to solid mode. If I ever had to actually find a hole that way I`d be SOL!

    [/url]
    I agree, they are handy, I used this one every day camping - bright, .2 ounces, has an on/off switch (some you have to squeeze to stay on), about $5. I've added it to the daily pack. Princeton Tec Pulsar II LED Key Chain Light
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  16. #16
    Wierdo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,025
    Man some of you people carry a lot of stuff! I carry:

    - Some sort of multi-tool (cannot remember the brand)
    - Two spare tubes
    - One tire lever
    - A patch kit

    I wonder if the amount of stuff you carry is inversely proportional to the distance you ride?

  17. #17
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,451
    I forgot to list a masterlink. There's one or two of those in my bag-o-tricks.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  18. #18
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    I wonder if the amount of stuff you carry is inversely proportional to the distance you ride?
    Ouch!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    I just have bad luck. If I don't have it (tool/part/jimmyrig) I know it's gonna break as soon as I'm somewhere I can't get help. Thing is I use my tools more for other's bikes than my own anymore, but the last time I didn't have my patch kit and multi-tool I had a flat and had my shift cable come loose on the rear derailleur.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  20. #20
    Still want a fat bike....
    Reputation: Dalton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    263
    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    Man some of you people carry a lot of stuff! I carry:

    - Some sort of multi-tool (cannot remember the brand)
    - Two spare tubes
    - One tire lever
    - A patch kit

    I wonder if the amount of stuff you carry is inversely proportional to the distance you ride?
    But how do you fill that flat once you fix it?
    I am a man of many words. KCCO!

  21. #21
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    Man some of you people carry a lot of stuff! I carry:

    - Some sort of multi-tool (cannot remember the brand)
    - Two spare tubes
    - One tire lever
    - A patch kit

    I wonder if the amount of stuff you carry is inversely proportional to the distance you ride?
    Oh, snap!

    But I'm reminded of one of my friends who had a full set of individual hex keys and some wrenches for bolt sizes she doesn't even have on her bike. She mostly used the bike for commuting; she also did some of those insanely long, insanely slow rides that only people who just started cycling and are REALLY INTO IT seem capable of. At this point, I think it's just commutes, and only on some days.

    For a while, I took a Leatherman with me. But it was mostly redundant with my multi tool. It's hard for me to imagine needing the knife or the pliers, but maybe one of these days I'll wish I had one or the other.

    I used to take a small Crescent wrench for my fenders. Actually, I should put that back in my stuff sack, it does come up every now and then.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    I wonder if the amount of stuff you carry is inversely proportional to the distance you ride?
    It might also have something to do with who has someone willing to come pick them up/rescue when not if something breaks. There are a couple areas I'm near that have no cell signal and a loooong walk to services.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,091
    What's a CZ-82?

  24. #24
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    8,365
    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    What's a CZ-82?
    Appears to be some sort of Czech military issue handgun. Probably not legal here in the U.S.
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    What's a CZ-82?
    One of these
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  26. #26
    Making due...
    Reputation: DuManchu's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    55
    At the moment I'm playing with fire a bit. I only carry my phone.

    Granted, I'm new to commuting and will eventually have tools and spares to bring along, but for now I ride on a wing and a prayer.

    At least my commute is only 7 miles, and the only reason it's even that long is because I take a long, roundabout way to avoid busy interstate overpasses and 4-lane roads. So if need be, the longest I'd have to walk is 3 miles.
    1991 Trek 830 Antelope (Commuter/Street/Paved Trail Duty)
    2006 Raleigh Mojave "Lager" Hardtail (XC Budget Build)

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: camekanix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    226
    [QUOTEWhat's a CZ-82? ][/QUOTE]
    Perfectly legal surplus handgun. I carry in isolated areas where mountain lions or coyote may me encountered.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,083
    Quote Originally Posted by camekanix View Post
    [QUOTEWhat's a CZ-82? ]
    Perfectly legal surplus handgun. I carry in isolated areas where mountain lions or coyote may me encountered.[/QUOTE]

    bear spray


    that way you won't get arrested for killing without a tag......


    og and coyotes are an issue?????

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: camekanix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    226
    They can be if there's more than one. Rabies ar a possibility as well. No tag needed if self defense and it's not like my tool kit includes dressing knives and butcher paper, lol.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,083
    Quote Originally Posted by camekanix View Post
    They can be if there's more than one. Rabies ar a possibility as well. No tag needed if self defense and it's not like my tool kit includes dressing knives and butcher paper, lol.
    Scare a pack of coyotes is easy....

    Around here several arrest and successful prosecutions have been made for people killing animals and claiming self defense....the courts are seeing through the simple dogma...

    I was scared so I shot it.

  31. #31
    Wierdo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,025
    Quote Originally Posted by Dalton View Post
    But how do you fill that flat once you fix it?
    Whoops, yes I carry a pump. It just seems like part of the bike so I forgot to list it.

    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    It might also have something to do with who has someone willing to come pick them up/rescue when not if something breaks. There are a couple areas I'm near that have no cell signal and a loooong walk to services.
    You could be right, but I think it's more like when you pack for that vacation...you start throwing stuff into the suitcase because you "might" need it. When you get home you realize that you could have gotten away with half the stuff!

    Which makes me curious...how often do you all have something really break on your bikes during your commutes?

    For me, over the past four years of commuting between 6000 and 7000 miles/year I have only had two things break. Once, my rear derailleur cable snapped but I was able to tweak the limit screws to fix the bike in a mid-gear and then single-speeded it about 16 miles to home. The second was when the rear derailleur got pushed into the spokes (by a sock!). Had to make the call of shame on that one since I was not carrying a spare derailleur

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    You could be right, but I think it's more like when you pack for that vacation...you start throwing stuff into the suitcase because you "might" need it. When you get home you realize that you could have gotten away with half the stuff!
    You are right, in that I haven't needed 90% of what I carry, but like I said certain areas around me has little/no cell coverage, and even if I could call, cab companies around here aren't set up to carry bicycles, and won't carry one unless it's an emergency. I pack what I do 'cause if the bike malfunctions, if I don't fix her, she won't get home.

    BTW, You mean that your pump isn't part of the bike?! I look at mine just like the saddle or tires; if it ain't there, I don't go!
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  33. #33
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,716
    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post

    Which makes me curious...how often do you all have something really break on your bikes during your commutes?

    For me, over the past four years of commuting between 6000 and 7000 miles/year I have only had two things break. Once, my rear derailleur cable snapped but I was able to tweak the limit screws to fix the bike in a mid-gear and then single-speeded it about 16 miles to home. The second was when the rear derailleur got pushed into the spokes (by a sock!). Had to make the call of shame on that one since I was not carrying a spare derailleur
    Well, now we know what happens to those socks that disappear in the wash!

    I've had a couple of mechanicals that reduced the bike to a scooter - I toasted a bottom bracket and the pedals wouldn't turn, and I wore out an old freewheel, which allowed pedaling but no forward movement (neutral gear). I trashed a carbon fork in a crash on ice, but was oblivious of the damage and it got me home fine. I had a v-brake problem that resulted in dragging on the rim, I just disconnected it temporarily and used the other brake. Had chainsuck so bad I had to remove the FD to untangle it. I had a clipless pedal come off the spindle with the cleat, but fixed it with a multitool and a rock instead of c-clip pliers. Most other "broken" situations were really re-tightenings, like fenders that worked loose, a slide-y seatpost, a brake lever that was not tight on the bars.

  34. #34
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    Which makes me curious...how often do you all have something really break on your bikes during your commutes?
    In NY, I had vandalism problems.

    Since moving to WA in 2008 and not counting the '70s department store bike I had for a little while, I've had some flats, some broken spokes, some alignment problems with fenders and a couple thrown screws, a wheel tacoed in an accident (called my roommate that time,) a broken handlebar (walked home,) a broken shifter and a broken frame.

    I'm currently riding a mid-2000s bike that I'm hoping won't give me as much trouble with dying wheels, hubs, frames, etc. as the '80s bikes have, although it's had its own wear issues with Trek's stupid wheels and SRAM's stupid shifters. So it seems like I just chew my commute bikes. While my nicer road bike isn't problem-free, I don't think I've had nearly as much trouble with it either.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,468
    I carry a Crank Bros 17, spare tube (2), vulcanizing patch kit, tire boot, three steel core levers (my trail tires are a super tight fit) and a blackburn mammoth pump. I also carry a stubby 15mm wrench in case I run into someone with track nuts.

  36. #36
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    It's hard for me to imagine needing the knife or the pliers, but maybe one of these days I'll wish I had one or the other.

    I used to take a small Crescent wrench for my fenders.
    I use the point of my knife for digging thorns out of rubber.

    Oh, yeah- I carry a fender wrench on my commuter (forgot that on my list above). But rather than a Crescent wrench, I use a tiny box end wrench that I made specifically for my fender nuts, very compact and weighs only a few grams. A chopped off 8mm or 10mm wrench (or even a whole one) from the flea market will be lighter and much more compact than a 6" adjustable, though that`s about the only thing on a bike it`s any good for.

    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    BTW, You mean that your pump isn't part of the bike?! I look at mine just like the saddle or tires; if it ain't there, I don't go!
    I think you misread that part- he apparently has the same opinion there as you do. Same as mine too.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I toasted a bottom bracket and the pedals wouldn't turn, and I wore out an old freewheel, which allowed pedaling but no forward movement (neutral gear). I trashed a carbon fork in a crash on ice, but was oblivious of the damage and it got me home fine. I had a v-brake problem that resulted in dragging on the rim, I just disconnected it temporarily and used the other brake. Had chainsuck so bad I had to remove the FD to untangle it. I had a clipless pedal come off the spindle with the cleat, but fixed it with a multitool and a rock instead of c-clip pliers.
    Wow! Ya know, I remember some of those incedents, but never put them all together. If you ever come to ride my area, stay away from the casinos cause your luck doesn`t seem good!

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post

    I think you misread that part- he apparently has the same opinion there as you do. Same as mine too.
    I stand corrected.

    It seems like most of the patches I've ever had to apply to a tube always were so close to the join seam on the tube (I've mentioned my luck before), and I had to shave the seam smooth to get a good seal, so a sharp knife or razor blade just became part of the patch kit. Plus the fact I always have a pocket knife, then most of my multi-tools have knife blades in them.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,091
    On my commuter I don't bother carrying a patch kit and knife just a spare tube, I will repair the tube when I get home.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeCOLORADO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,919
    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Appears to be some sort of Czech military issue handgun. Probably not legal here in the U.S.
    That's funny, what makes you think it might not be legal here in the US?
    GoatRidesBikes.com
    Goat Rides Bikes @ YouTube
    "I may be old and fat, but at least I'm slow." - Me

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    13
    My commute is 23 miles each way, so it would really suck to break down . I didn't carry any tools. But on my last ride, next morning I saw that I had a slow leak. So glad it wasn't flat during the ride. Therefore, I went to my local bike shop and bought a pump. I recommend one with a gauge and a lever to be able to use your foot for more leverage. I will also include an extra tube and tire levers to make the swap easier. Other than that, make sure you have plenty of water. Running out of water make the ride miserable.

  41. #41
    Unhinged Aussie on a 29er
    Reputation: hunter006's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    452
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    In NY, I had vandalism problems.

    Since moving to WA in 2008 and not counting the '70s department store bike I had for a little while, I've had some flats, some broken spokes, some alignment problems with fenders and a couple thrown screws, a wheel tacoed in an accident (called my roommate that time,) a broken handlebar (walked home,) a broken shifter and a broken frame.

    I'm currently riding a mid-2000s bike that I'm hoping won't give me as much trouble with dying wheels, hubs, frames, etc. as the '80s bikes have, although it's had its own wear issues with Trek's stupid wheels and SRAM's stupid shifters. So it seems like I just chew my commute bikes. While my nicer road bike isn't problem-free, I don't think I've had nearly as much trouble with it either.
    Sounds... familiar... so... familiar...

    My toolkit was insanely heavy on my last bike after having similar experiences to you (everything in bold). It's much lighter now , although I can't really explain why - experience perhaps?

    Wheel taco'd on the rail tracks in Ballard, thumbtacks on the Mercer Island dual use path, a few flats, rode home with my broken handlebar, rode on a broken frame although that was still in warranty so it wasn't so bad. Did pretty well on some rims, 16,900 mi out of a single rear wheel.

    I discovered my SRAM shifters were broken the day before I was due to do a double century ride, was not a happy chappy on that one - luckily sourced some replacement shifters for a lovely $503. SRAM eventually issued a refund, but it sucked while they were broken.

    The stem was the only original part on my old commuter when I gave it away. The shifter issue is the only thing that's happened to my nice bike. 3,000 mi and still rolling on the original components. Chain stretch is within tolerance too.

    This thread is also reminding me that i need to source a Powerlink. I used my last one, and having walked home before after snapping a chain, I'd rather not go through that experience again...

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    I do believe the best motivator for buying tools/parts isn't word of mouth or advertizing, it's having to walk home or push your ride home a couple of miles. I've only ran out of gas once, after pushing my car 1.5 miles with my VERY p.o.ed girlfriend at the time I never ran out of gas ever again. Started to carry a multi-tool and a chain breaker the first time I had to walk home about 6 miles after snapping my chain, and could have fixed it if only I had the tools with me. My challenge now is to keep my tool collection from growing. It's too easy to say "Oh I could really use that do-hickey".
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  43. #43
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,716
    Adding another lightweight tool...
    After having difficulty unzipping a household item when the zipper pull broke off, I am adding a twist tie and/or paper clip to my pack. The twist tie worked well at home, and even survived the wash for easy zipping afterwards.

  44. #44
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    I`m all set with the twist tie! I`ve had one wrapped around my left brake and shift cables now for about two months because I never got around to "unnstalling" it after I parked it there temoprarrily while eating the last of a bag of mixed nuts

  45. #45
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    8,365
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeCOLORADO View Post
    That's funny, what makes you think it might not be legal here in the US?
    We’ll let repeat murderers and sexual offenders (as well as crooked bankers) run amok in society but in certain states are really sensitive to personal defense means. My initial knee-jerk reaction to a non-US made weapon capable of automatic-firing bullet deployment obviously kicks in.
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  46. #46
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    We’ll let repeat murderers and sexual offenders (as well as crooked bankers) run amok in society but in certain states are really sensitive to personal defense means. My initial knee-jerk reaction to a non-US made weapon capable of automatic-firing bullet deployment obviously kicks in.
    BAR in 300 WinMag: okie dokie
    .223 with black plastic handguards: watch list time

    Yeah, whatever.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    BAR in 300 WinMag: okie dokie
    .223 with black plastic handguards: watch list time

    Yeah, whatever.
    While I was in the Navy back in early 90's I was stationed at NAS Miramar. At that time they were trying to pass an 'assault weapons ban' state wide. On public television there was a debate between spokespersons from both sides. During the arguments the spokesperson from the NRA held up a Ruger Mini 22 with the black fiberglass folding stock, laser sights, and a high capacity magazine, and asked him about it. The guy against went on a diatribe about how weapons like that were killing kids and generally ruining life as we know it. Then the NRA guy held up another Ruger Mini 22 with a lovely walnut stock and regular scope and asked about that rifle. The guy against says how there's nothing wrong with that rifle, it's obviously for use in hunting and sport shooting and should be perfectly legal. When informed that they were the same weapon, just with different stocks, the guy against was completely flabbergasted and couldn't say anything.

    I never minded people who don't like guns, to each their own. I just wish some of them would use a little consistency and logic about their dislike.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: camekanix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    226
    Holy Smokes guys, I really didn't mean to hijack this thread! I saw a mountain lion in my neighborhood just last year, a pack (4) of coyote just yesterday in the park across my street. I often ride alone in places where I may fall victim to all sorts of things and occasionally ( not always ) carry a firearm. Totally legal and often encouraged by LEO's in this area.Ask a Maricopa County Sheriff If he or she would be caught out in the desert without a firearm. Didn't mean to alarm anybody!

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: junior1210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,001
    It's no sweat camekanix, when I titled this thread I purposely used the word 'packing' for a reason.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Straz85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,348
    -Topeak multitool (forget which model, but it includes tire levers and a chain tool, both of which have been used multiple times)
    -Some sort of mini pump attached to my bottle cage
    -Spare tube

    I carry more when I mountain bike. A Topeak Alien 2 which is basically a whole toolbox, a patch kit, spare power link and first aid kit.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeCOLORADO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,919
    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    We’ll let repeat murderers and sexual offenders (as well as crooked bankers) run amok in society but in certain states are really sensitive to personal defense means. My initial knee-jerk reaction to a non-US made weapon capable of automatic-firing bullet deployment obviously kicks in.
    OK. Well, most weapons bought and sold in the US are not US made. The CZ-28 is semi-auto, meaning it only fires each time you pull the trigger until the magazine is empty. Full auto firearms can be purchased (VERY few are handguns), but are prohibitively expensive and require a special license (Class 3 license).
    GoatRidesBikes.com
    Goat Rides Bikes @ YouTube
    "I may be old and fat, but at least I'm slow." - Me

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeCOLORADO View Post
    Full auto firearms can be purchased (VERY few are handguns), but are prohibitively expensive and require a special license (Class 3 license).
    Class devices such as Full-Auto require a BATF background check (Local Sheriff to sign off on your form as well) and a $200.00 Tax Stamp per item, a full auto with disconnecting Supressor for example would require a $200 stamp for the firearm and a $200 stamp for the Supressor. The process in obtaining a Tax Stamp and physically taking possession of said item takes about 4-6 months. Repeats, people going for a second or more stamp could see quicker turn around times. A friend of mind got his Suppressor an Stamp in just 4 months...first time applying for one. You also should consider obtaining an attorney who is filmiliar with Class III items and setting up Trust and or Corperations for such items. Corperations are nice in that multiple people can be listed for said weapon. As for cost, it' been a while but the cheapest full auto I remember ran 3,000-3,500 and top out around 100,000-500,000 ( these are generally mini-guns or rare guns like there is only one legally transferable SAW in the US). There is only about 100,000 legally transferable full automatics in the US (anything made after May 1986 is for military or Law Enforcement only...Class III Dealers can obtain newer FAs and able to use them for things like movies etc) and you got a better chance of winning the lotto in every state at one time than legally making any additional FAs.

    Anyhow, that is just some rough info for those who are interested.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeCOLORADO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,919
    50calray...I wouldn't mind working a few belts through a Ma Deuce. Talk about a spendy habit.
    GoatRidesBikes.com
    Goat Rides Bikes @ YouTube
    "I may be old and fat, but at least I'm slow." - Me

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.