What kind of pedals do you use with your commute bike?- Mtbr.com

View Poll Results: Well, what kind?

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  • Flats with toe clips

    9 9.57%
  • Flats without toe clips

    37 39.36%
  • Clipless pedals

    40 42.55%
  • Dual-sided pedals (flat on one side, clipless mechanism on the other.)

    8 8.51%
Results 1 to 33 of 33
  1. #1
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    What kind of pedals do you use with your commute bike?

    I know what kind I like, but a product I saw at my shop earlier this evening got me thinking about it again.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  2. #2
    weirdo
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    Must have been an exceptionally interresting product to spawn a poll. Are you going to enlighten us?
    Recalculating....

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Pearl Izumi casual clipless pedal shoes. They look like a running shoe, including laces and an (apparent) air heel, but are drilled for an SPD cleat.

    It's not really that new or that different, but my teammates and I talked about it some. For me, this kind of shoe occupies an awkward middle ground, and actually, I think that for my commute, at least, clipless pedals are a bit silly. Basically, the system does nothing that running shoes and toe clips don't do, but it does require me to wear the matching shoe in order to avoid being really awkward to use, while with my current system, I can wear different shoes when mine get waterlogged, wear work boots if I'm going to a gig that I want to wear work boots to, etc. So by choosing to just use flats and toe clips, I feel I've kept my commute bike easier to use, at least for how I use it, and I don't see that I've given up very much over one of my "serious" bikes in terms of pedaling efficiency.

    To be fair, when I was in college, I felt a need to wear cycling shoes to ride my commute bike, and I clopped around in casual cycling shoes on campus all day. I've also been known to switch to a racing bike when I have a little longer commute, and leave some shoes at the office.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    Flats for now, but I want to switch to clipless and a cycling shoe probably next season. My current "cycling" (and running, and hiking, and sometimes around town) shoes (Merrell Sonic Glove) are pretty bad for the job anyways and there's one or two parts of the commute that on a daily basis nearly send me down on my top tube as my feet fly off the pedals.

  5. #5
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    Wellgo M-149, MTB pedals lol. Ride hardtail with Conti's raceking 2.2 for commute

  6. #6
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    (snip) ...there's one or two parts of the commute that on a daily basis nearly send me down on my top tube as my feet fly off the pedals.
    On a daily basis? What are you doing, greasing up the platforms?
    Recalculating....

  7. #7
    Still want a fat bike....
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    I roll my Fyxation Gates pedals, but more and more I am thinking about getting some of the corresponding straps they sell. I am noticing more and more slippage with the condition of the roads I am riding.....
    I am a man of many words. KCCO!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    On a daily basis? What are you doing, greasing up the platforms?
    There's not a lot of actual traction between shoes and pedals, worse if they're wet, and along a short trail there's a little bump that's shaped just right to lift me off the pedals if i'm cranking and hit it at speed. It's a stupid little bump, less than a foot high and maybe a few feet in length, but something about the way it's shaped just isn't good for me.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    What are your pedals made of?

    If they're plastic, once they get wet, you may as well be greasing the platforms. Better platform pedals, especially with some foot retention, are a lot more secure.

    I'm enjoying seeing how this poll is going. I'm surprised that flats with toe clips are so unpopular.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
    Still want a fat bike....
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    I typically do use a flat with a half clip in the summer, but I wear different shoes in the winter, so right now I am just rolling the flats.
    I am a man of many words. KCCO!

  11. #11
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    I use XT trail pedals with the large platform around the clip mechanism. If I'm riding clipless shoes they're great, if I'm riding normal shoes I just drop the saddle a hair and use the platforms.

    Not comfortable to stand on or ride for long distances but works well for rides around 5-6 miles.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    What are your pedals made of?

    If they're plastic, once they get wet, you may as well be greasing the platforms. Better platform pedals, especially with some foot retention, are a lot more secure.

    I'm enjoying seeing how this poll is going. I'm surprised that flats with toe clips are so unpopular.
    Plastic, they came with the bike. I don't see a reason not to go to clipless when I upgrade pedals though, especially since I'd probably buy some cycling shoes anyways.

  13. #13
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I had the flat/spd two-sided pedals for quite a while, and I loved them. Sold the bike they were on and never missed the bike, but I was sad to see those pedals go. An awesome option for anyone who wants to be able to 'really' ride and/or buzz to work or the store in 'normal' shoes, in my opinion. I'm all SPD on all my bikes now, but if I still had those pedals I'd throw them on one of my bikes to make it more friendly for jumping on to play with my kids, etc.
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  14. #14
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    I use a pair of Shimano SPD pedals that have a detachable plastic platform. So one side is platform, the other clipless. The ONLY reason I use these is that I still take this bike for little rides with my 6 year old on the bike path and don't want to be clipped in. Otherwise, I'd rock pure clipless.

  15. #15
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    SPD clipless. I just like them better. It doesn't bother me to walk around all day in my bike shoes, and if I need a different pair then I bring them with.. I ALWAYS wear a 30L capacity Osprey hydration pack when I ride. always. and on my commuter I have saddle bags and a rear pack.

    I'm just used to wearing a pack that big, cause it's the pack I BC ski with, and when the dog is with me, I have enough room for his supplies too.
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  16. #16
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    Platforms

    I use DMR V8 platform pedals for my commuter bike. I don't have to get that dressed up for work so I like being able to wear one pair of footwear to the office to simplify things. Also in the winter I am able to wear my winter hiking boots to keep my feet warm. The pedals are pretty impossible to slip off of in any condition as they have metal pins in the pedal body are were meant for DH/Dirt Jumping.

    I ride clipless on all my other bikes though.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Basically, the system does nothing that running shoes and toe clips don't do
    Not true for some of us. Because of knee tendonitis issues, clipless makes a big difference for me, even if I am only riding 5-10 miles each way. I am going to try out power grips this winter though, as I do prefer the flexibility of shoe choices with toe straps.

  18. #18
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    One bike, I commute with dual-sided SPDs, the other is rat traps.

    Voted for toe clips just to skew results

    For what my opinion is worth...Shimano's 'trail' style pedal can have one of the sides removed, and you're left with a platform and a clip, that costs half of what the purpose made platform/clip 'road' SPDs.

  19. #19
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    I like my regular platforms. Less fuss. What I don't like is putting many miles on them with regular tennis shoes. My commute is short now, so it's not a big deal. But the soles are too flexible for long rides. I will probably get some of those "casual" bike shoes for the purpose at some point, and just not put cleats on them. The stiffer sole is all I need, and I don't really want to go all the way to 5.10's with sticky rubber.

  20. #20
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    Plastic, they came with the bike. I don't see a reason not to go to clipless when I upgrade pedals though, especially since I'd probably buy some cycling shoes anyways.
    I`ve seen plastic pedals with molded in pins, but never used them- don`t know if yours have pins. The pinned aluminum BMX pedals REALLY stick to shoes- feet don`t slip off. The downside is that they aren`t very shin frinedly. I haven`t had a problem with it, but apparently many riders do. Any rate, I`m sure you`ll be loving life with either BMX pedals or clickety kind. Slipping off every day has got to get old!

    Quote Originally Posted by fotooutdoors View Post
    Because of knee tendonitis issues, clipless makes a big difference for me, even if I am only riding 5-10 miles each way.
    You mean that your knees feel better with clipless? Any idea why?

    I keep seeing mention (only a little in this thread, but common on pedal threads in general) of riders who specify that they use clickies for long rides and "other" pedals for short rides. I get that it isn`t worth trouble to change shoes for only a few minutes, but I wonder if more people would start grooving on flat pedals if they gave them a chance on long rides. As it happens, I had to start looking for alternatives for my Candies when I started riding longer because they make my feet hurt after a few hours. More recently I started thinking about all the hype (deserved) about how more hand positions make long rides more comfortable by giving hour hands a break, and I don`t see why it wouldn`t aply to feet also. I imagine better shoes would have helped some, but I move my feet frequently, and also attribute part of my lessened foot pain to that freedom. Don`t like having my feet "nailed" to the pedals any more. Even cleat/pedal systems with a lot of float won`t let you slide front-rear or side to side.
    Recalculating....

  21. #21
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I`ve seen plastic pedals with molded in pins, but never used them- don`t know if yours have pins. The pinned aluminum BMX pedals REALLY stick to shoes- feet don`t slip off. The downside is that they aren`t very shin frinedly. I haven`t had a problem with it, but apparently many riders do. Any rate, I`m sure you`ll be loving life with either BMX pedals or clickety kind. Slipping off every day has got to get old!
    Plastic pedals that come on bikes = awful. I did a mtb ride in Hawaii with them and had endless problems with grip when the trail was tight and techy and I needed all the grip I could get.

    I use plastic BMX pedals with the molded pins on my commuter. MUCH better results. Not quite aluminum flats with screw-in pins deathgrip (and shin shredding), but still much better. I'd go with the pinned metal flats if it wasn't for the fact that I'd rather not shred the soles of harder-rubber street shoes on them. but it's even been wet around here the last few days and I've had plenty of grip on the pedals with the wetness. cost me $14 at the LBS. as my footwear use changes, I may use a better flat pedal in the future.

  22. #22
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    Flats without clips because my commuter is also becoming my bar bike and clips + beer = dental work
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  23. #23
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    eggbeater 2 with some
    keen austin cycling shoes
    Keen Austin Pedal Bike Shoes - Men's - Free Shipping at REI.com

    its nice to get into work (i'm the first one there) and get my day started slowly. it normally takes me an hour or so to even fully change out of my cycling gear.

  24. #24
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    LOOK Quartz, same pedal I run on my SS and FS. I have "S" Defroster shoes...waterproof and warm.

  25. #25
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    Answer Rove pedals, then wear my FiveTen's around the office sometimes.

  26. #26
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I have some cheap aluminum flats with molded pins and concave faces. They're also a lot better than plastic, and also relatively okay without shin guards.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    You mean that your knees feel better with clipless? Any idea why?
    There are two reasons, as far as I can tell.

    First, the neutral position for my feet (especially my right) is pointed out somewhat. If I force my toes to point straight forward, I get tendonitis. I can (and do) adjust for that with clipless, but can't with toe clips.

    Second, clipless allows for a lower Q-factor. When I ride flats, I don't feel comfortable keeping my feet so close in because I am afraid (due to experience) of hitting my heel on the chainstay. Because clipless is predictable and has a return spring to keep my heel away from the chainstay, I can run much closer.

    Ultimately, the former issue could be solved by flats but the latter negates it and I really like having foot retention in traffic (I don't want to go down because I lost grip on my pedal) and while riding my SS (spinning like crazy).

    Hope that makes sense!

  28. #28
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    I use generic flat pedals fitted with PowerGrips; I find powergrips a good compromise solution. I am thinking of try out the velo orange Grand Cru Sabot Pedals, those are supposedly powergrip compatible which is seems uncommon with platform style pedals.

  29. #29
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    Powergrips w/ the powergrips flat pedals. They work quite well, though they really take a polish off a dress shoe, just fyi.

    Posted w/ Tapatalk via Android

  30. #30
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    Shimano 540's + my Chrome Midway Pros = Happy me.
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  31. #31
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    If Time ever stops making the classic ATAC design, I will be sad; ATAC has been better to me than anything else.

    Oddly enough, I have two pairs of Shimano clipless MTB shoes -- MT23's and MT33's -- and they are VERY walk-friendly! The 33's combine comfort and support for my job, so I've been working in MTB shoes since about June. The last pair of shoes I had that were as/more comfortable were a set of Reebok joggers in '97.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  32. #32
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    Anyone use Crampon Ultimates? Feedback?

  33. #33
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    SHIMANO A530 SPD single sided touring pedals

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