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  1. #801
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    ^ it was for a very elderly and not-particularly-close relative, so as funerals go it wasn't too rough. Which is why I spent the time mostly talking about bikes.

    I'd been stalling on the gryphon because:

    It's not a true 29+ (although I don't actually care about 29+, but would just like it for future-proofing)
    It can't take a suspension fork (which I'm even less interested in, but again future-proofing would be nice)
    I figure a Fargo would be easier to resell inthe future if I ever want to (except it would also cost $400 more to buy a Fargo today)

    But I figure that even if someone announces my dream bike tomorrow it would still be a year before I'd be able to get one. And the future stuff is even further out. So why wait?

  2. #802
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    ^^It looks like a cool bike, enjoy!

  3. #803
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    Why wait? Go for it, and congrats on the purchase. Will be looking forward to seeing pictures of this.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  4. #804
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    Noticed that the rear wheel of my fixie had some play, so I grabbed the cone wrenches. Took a couple of cracks at it, and couldn't fix it even though the cones are in pretty good shape. Finally cranked down on the cones, and the play was still there, so what's the problem?

    This wheel has a standard multi-speed disc hub, with the fixed cog bolted to the disc side, and an ss kit on the freehub. And the freehub was actually what was loose. So I pulled the axle out, cranked down on the fixing-bolt, and successfully put the bearings back together.

    This one's my fault. Freehubs are normally such a pain to remove, and the last time that I'd put this one back together I must have been too gentle (hoping it would be easier to remove the next time). But apparently you really do need to crank down on those things.

  5. #805
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    You know how you put a stem on, and then you tighten everything up, double check it, and sit there and cannot decide if the bar is straight or not? Been going back and forth on if it was or not by eyeballing it and walking away for a few hours then coming back and looking again. It was off I think so I slightly adjusted that and gave the bike a full wipe down. Fat bike is sitting there just filthy but it will probably stay that way through most of the winter.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  6. #806
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    I disassembled some **** shimano bb, degreased it and filled it with molykote. Putting it on soon. I will last a long time now filled with real lube. It was some translucent green **** in there from the factory. But hey, why take a chance. probably gonna get 5 years out of that bb now. With absolutely no service.

    I also machined some spacers for my cranks to get a good chainline. i made 2, 1mm ones, and one of each of 2,3,4 and 5mm, I made them out of bronze since that was what I had laying around for free. And its much better than alu.

    What have you done to your commuter today?-spacers.jpg

    I made all that to be able to run these bad ass *****es!!

    What have you done to your commuter today?-da.jpg
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  7. #807
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    You know how you put a stem on, and then you tighten everything up, double check it, and sit there and cannot decide if the bar is straight or not? Been going back and forth on if it was or not by eyeballing it and walking away for a few hours then coming back and looking again. It was off I think so I slightly adjusted that and gave the bike a full wipe down. Fat bike is sitting there just filthy but it will probably stay that way through most of the winter.
    even when its 100% straight its gonna look weird if you look at it long enough. I believe you can have it several degrees off before you actually notice it while riding. like 5 degrees or something.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  8. #808
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    I disassembled some **** shimano bb, degreased it and filled it with molykote. Putting it on soon. I will last a long time now filled with real lube. It was some translucent green **** in there from the factory. But hey, why take a chance. probably gonna get 5 years out of that bb now.
    I'm honestly not sure that the lubricant is real problem with EBBs. I think the stock seals and small bearings are the problem. But good luck with it.

  9. #809
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    What have you done to your commuter today?



    Added a 75mm 35deg riser, had a 100mm 7 degree on it.

    Added my sled hand guards.... We will see if they do anything. They cut the wind awesome on the sled but dont survive roll overs to get unstuck.

    I dont like the thought of muffs..... Feel like you could hurt a wrist or hand in a crash.


    #canadastrong
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  10. #810
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    What have you done to your commuter today?

    Quote Originally Posted by solarplex View Post


    Added a 75mm 35deg riser, had a 100mm 7 degree on it.

    Added my sled hand guards.... We will see if they do anything. They cut the wind awesome on the sled but dont survive roll overs to get unstuck.

    I dont like the thought of muffs..... Feel like you could hurt a wrist or hand in a crash.


    #canadastrong
    Fingers didnt get cold today and was -17 degrees, colder than the last 2 weeks


    #canadastrong
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  11. #811
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    On thursday I picked up my new frame. Yesterday I frame-savered it and added reflective tape. Today I headed to the co-op to install the headset, and spent the rest of the day swapping parts over - mostly painless, but mounting the rack required a lot of fiddling and took forever. Puttered around on the bike a bit, and confirmed that it is not too small for me (I was right between sizes, and couldn't be sure). Tomorrow should be the inaugural ride (although the overnight temp will be -30C/-22F), and photos.

  12. #812
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    All done:


    And the inaugural ride at -8F, with the sunset at 4:15:


    It's pretty much a straight parts-swap from my kona - the only thing new is the headset. This frame is meant for dropbars with a short toptube, so I should be able to get away without the highrise stem that I'd been using on the kona. But after riding hunched over for so long this is a a nice change, so I'll keep it for awhile. But I've got 3 old stems in the partsbin to try out over the next few weeks.

  13. #813
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    And some daytime pics:



    This is my first eccentric bottom bracket. People seem to love them or hate them, but the general consensus seems to be that Singular does it right:


    The British Racing Green shows up best in this photo - it was one of the reasons I was hesitant to get a Gryphon, but I think it works pretty well:


    Lots of room in the fork, to apparently fit 29+ tires. Also plenty of clearance in the rear that will apparently fit some (but not all) 29+.


    (if someone releases a nice ~3" studded tire and it doesn't fit the frame, I figure that worst-case I could always build a 650b rear wheel and run that for winter instead)

  14. #814
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    I like the bike and the green!

  15. #815
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    Quiet around here. No one else is tweaking things?

    I drilled out two bolts on my old frame. They were holding on the rear IS adapter for the disc brake, they'd originally been installed by the shop when I bought the bike, and they would not budge. I'd soaked them overnight in wd40, and heated them, but no luck. But the drill worked like a charm. I've tried that before on small bolts with no success, but these were M5s so I was able to get a beefy bit in there.

    Also switched to spare stem #3 on the new frame, and I think this one may be a winner. #1 was a high-rise 40deg stem I'd been using on the old frame, and it was fine, but I was hoping I could get away with something less weird. #2 was 80mm/8deg and felt maybe a little too stretched out. #3 is 60mm/6deg and feels pretty good. Still plenty of experimenting to do though.

  16. #816
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Quiet around here. No one else is tweaking things?

    I drilled out two bolts on my old frame. They were holding on the rear IS adapter for the disc brake, they'd originally been installed by the shop when I bought the bike, and they would not budge. I'd soaked them overnight in wd40, and heated them, but no luck. But the drill worked like a charm. I've tried that before on small bolts with no success, but these were M5s so I was able to get a beefy bit in there.
    Sounds like the shop is liberal with their lock-tite. That's why I prefer beeswax; it accomplishes the same thing but without the seized bolt effect.

    On to bike changes: the new rear rack is nearly completed. Just one more stay to braze and then the mounting tabs. ~6 hours of work.

    I also swapped the single-speed rear hub for an 8 speed hub. But will switch back when the weather turns wet again.

  17. #817
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Quiet around here. No one else is tweaking things?
    Nope Sadly, my bike is attached to the trainer until spring. The mountain bike is still available for outdoor rides.

    Congrats on the new bike -- I'm digging the green color and stripes combo.

  18. #818
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    I switched over to my "fat" winter tires (2.1" Serfas Drifters) and two new slime tubes last night, so things felt "different" today. Nice little confidence boost on the one infrequently traveled bridge I cross that had a light coating of snow this morning.

    Nice bike, newfangled!
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  19. #819
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    Quote Originally Posted by WiTrailRunner View Post
    I'm digging the green color and stripes combo.
    It's funny, because the Gryphon is very similar to the Salsa Fargo, and the Fargo is offered in that same beautiful blue that your roadbike is. And I reeeeeeally like that blue...except that Salsa doesn't sell a matching steel fork. You can get carbon in blue, but I don't want carbon. The steel one only comes in black, and what good would that be?

    And so that's basically how I chose the gryphon. (although it was several hundred dollars cheaper, and has more tire clearance, and I don't tour which is what the Fargo is really designed for. But potential Gryphon downsides: <s>green</s>, <s>ebb</s>, <s>questionable rack-mounting</s>, non-tapered headset).

    But if I could have gotten a blue fork, I'd almost certainly have gone for the Fargo.
    Last edited by newfangled; 12-03-2014 at 04:52 PM.

  20. #820
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    Tried out my new headlight on the Kona on the return trip from my gym. I'm not going to make too many friends with that thing, it is BRIGHT! Seriously, the first time i fired it up I had it pointed towards my face (oops). I saw spots for about an hour. I've swapped out the stem on the Raleigh and squirted the center of the bars and the seatpost (wrinkle black FTW), will be reassembling it soon. . .

  21. #821
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    I did a bar swap on my Felt. I want to like these Fyxation bullhorns but I just don't. The reach is a bit too long and they are a bit too straight. Went back to the other bullhorns and I will wrap those this weekend I think with some Lizard Skin wrap that I did the bars on my Jamis with. Added a second NiteRider light mount on the bar of my fat bike. I have a Lumina 700 and 350 and the 350 is for the street and the combo will be for the MUP which should work nicely.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  22. #822
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    So I've been cleaning up my old frame since I want to try to sell it (locally - no spam here )

    I'd written my last name on it with autopaint, hoping that it might maybe possibly help to deter thieves (autopaint is super-easy to remove with acetone, but maybe thieves don't know that?). But I was always a bit worried that it might leave a stain or residue, particularly on a white frame. But no - it all cleaned right off.

    I'd also added a bunch of reflective tape, knowing that it's easy to remove with a hairdryer. But again, maybe after 5 years there would be some fading or staining? But no - it came off too.

    And that frame didn't have rack mounts, so I'd used p-clamps with electrical tape underneath to hopefully protect the paint. I took the clamps and tape came off, and the paint looked good as new.

    Also pulled off my tube-and-ziptie chainstay protector to find a pristine chainstay.

    So that's all good news. For a frame that's seen some pretty hard use it's still in really nice shape. And I've done all the same stuff to my other frames, so it's nice to confirm that it is indeed reversible.

    I did discover 3 pairs of wear marks on my fork. One is obviously from tirerub, which is surprising because I thought I had plenty of clearance and my rims are always true. There's another set just below the crown that must be from the clip-on fender that I'd been using, which is surprising because it didn't touch the fork legs and never rattled or anything. And the third set is at the crown on the front of the fork, and I'd swear they were cablerub, except the cables aren't anywhere near there (particularly the right fork leg). It's all minor, but still strange.

  23. #823
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Quiet around here. No one else is tweaking things?
    The usual, swapped 2 chains & 1 cassette. Cleaned 2 other drivetrains - real nice. Swapped most of the studded tires I own to their respective bikes.

    This weekend I have to run a new shift cable on the fatbike, take apart the shifter on the winter commuter and try to get it interested in shifting when it is cold and maybe through the studs on the 9er.

  24. #824
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    Lizard Skins DSP bar wrap installed. I have to come to terms with the fact that I pretty much suck at wrapping bars. The ends are just a struggle for me. It is a 5 footer for sure. Hoping to let the OCD rest a bit and not redo the right side.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  25. #825
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    Haven't ridden in over a week, I know I know, just certain things going on where I need to drive. Knowing I could ride this week (woo!!) I went to swap chains. Looks like I forgot to give the other chain some TLC, planned on riding the next day and handling it after that, well the darn thing was rusted solid. Oops, lesson learned about winter commuting and letting things sit too long before taking care of them.

    So I swapped out chains and trashed 1. Looks like my 2 chain rotation has turned into a one chain rotation.

  26. #826
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    My shifter overhaul seemed to be a huge success. It was not shifting in the cooler temps, for like a year. The pawl would not catch the tooth for downshifts. I took it apart alternated spraying it down with WD-40 and swabbing it out with Q-tips. I think it was old grease and grime that was getting stiff in the cold. This morning at 5F it didn't miss a shift.

  27. #827
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    I usually mix motor oil and some grease and just fill the shifters up like once every 2 years. I usually customize my greases this way for special purposes.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  28. #828
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    "Fill the shifters" ??? They have little teeny tiny springs and parts. They seem happiest with no grease. I used some teflon lube last year when I tried this that was supposed to be good down to -40F which helped some but I think I removed it all now and it is better.

    These are 20 year old Deore LX trigger shifters. I'm impressed at how well they have held up.

  29. #829
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    "Fill the shifters" ??? They have little teeny tiny springs and parts. They seem happiest with no grease. I used some teflon lube last year when I tried this that was supposed to be good down to -40F which helped some but I think I removed it all now and it is better.

    These are 20 year old Deore LX trigger shifters. I'm impressed at how well they have held up.
    I just fill them in one hole until it pours out of another. done. I have ran my xtr 9sp with only grease inside now for a year. Its full. I like my shifters full.
    Many things inside the shifters is made out of plastic, they put it on there for lubrication purposes. I'm guessing most shifters can run completely dry for a few years, but hey why take a chance. I don't leave **** up for grabs. So I go the extra mile. It took me about a day just to lube and grease everything on my new build. I only service my bike once a year. and thats how I like it.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  30. #830
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    Today I was all "hmm, I should try this can of retroreflective spray paint on something, how about... MY POGIES!" Now they have a little bit of reflectivity all over, although it's completely blown away by the iron-on reflective tape I had previously added. Well, whatever. Cheap thrills for the reflectivity junkie

    What have you done to your commuter today?-reflective_pogies.jpg

  31. #831
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    I've never done anything to my XTR shifters except a spritz of silicone spray once on a great while. They're over 15 years old.

    Measured the chain and it's time for a new one. It's at .75 after 6 months, which is a bit longer than average for me, probably because the winter grit is just getting going. It was a Connex.

  32. #832
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    reinstalled the basket after i replaced the bracket that busted. As much as i missed it for some reason it doesnt fit like it did before. Now, even with the levers near vertical they still hit the rim of the basket..very annoying. Looking @ it i think i have some options to lower it. Ill explore um tonite.

  33. #833
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    Finally, the rear rack is complete-ish (still some finishing work left):What have you done to your commuter today?-rear-rack.jpg

    aligned nicely (the rack, not the photo):

    What have you done to your commuter today?-rear-rack-2.jpg

    matches the front:

    What have you done to your commuter today?-front-rack.jpg

    ready to haul:

    What have you done to your commuter today?-tour-rig.jpg

  34. #834
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    ^ very nice. What year is the trek?

  35. #835
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    Inspired by some of your posts and by my larger tires for Christmas, I started cutting and bending my new fenders tonight.

    I coved out and steam bent the white oak for the rear. By Saturday, I'll know if I need to make a smaller form. Will post a few pics this weekend, my phone and laptop don't get along, so I have to make a point of using another camera.

    Anyone else try this? Any thoughts on hardware? I was planning to steal the factory fender hardware for now, but brass would set it all off better than the current stainless.

  36. #836
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ very nice. What year is the trek?
    '87? Haven't looked at the vintage Trek site in a while.

    It's a rescue frame. The stock bike sat locked at the school I go to for over a year without moving. Once a few parts disappeared I figured I'd better save it from the scrap heap.

    Hands down the finest bike I own. It'll be the basis for any new frame I build myself. Next step after making racks.

  37. #837
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    Rusted: brass is very easy to work, and if you have made your own fender, you'll have no problem making brackets.

    I would look at how SKS mounts their stuff, and copy it, as it would be easiest. You could even use their stays (available separately).

  38. #838
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    Thanks wschruba, I'll look at SKS. Thanks also for the vote of confidence, I have done some brass and some steel work but nothing refined. Doing the impossible with wood is my bread and butter. If I can buy their stays, I might avoid some head scratching.

  39. #839
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    I finished this yesterday.

    Rusted: Pick up a pair of straight aviation snips and some brass stock (check sign/award making places), and practice cutting radii into them, it isn't difficult with some practice, and you'll find that it is much faster than grinding/sanding them into shape. With something as simple as fender hardware, cut all of your holes, etc before you bend it into shape, you'll have much less in the way of headaches, especially where the stays pass through.

  40. #840
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    You can get solid brass rod too that you can bend to match an SKS stay. Chances are the LBS has a single stay around somewhere saving you buying a set if you want teh steam punk look to continue past the fender brackets. I assume you can by he stay bolts and nuts separately. You can buy the front QR sockets cheap. They let the metal eyelets snap into a plastic body that bolts to the mount point and come free is something pushes between tire and fender.

  41. #841
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    wshruba, That is an astonishing piece of work. Well done, an impressive display of tenacity and ingenuity in equal parts. Thanks for the sheet metal advice, I may try it yet.

    BrianMc, thanks also. The stock fender stays terminate cleanly without antennae, and I'd like to match that, just in prettier metal. The breakaway idea is great for the front, do you know if this can be popped on and off several times or is it a one time safety feature? Either way it might be worth the cost of admission once I get my forms to cooperate.

    I steamed both blanks after coving the radius of a 26x 1.75" tire, to a far greater degree of precision than I should have spent the time dialing in. Breaking them out of the forms tonight, I found that the width radius had flattened out significantly. I needed to use better/ tighter/ U- shaped wedges when I set the curve, or cut a deeper relief before bending.

    Really wishing I had the forms I made up a few years ago. Tomorrow is another night in the garage. I'll get some pics of the progress, and form failures, posted on Saturday.

    Thanks again for all the help on hardware and stays.
    Last edited by Rustedthrough; 12-18-2014 at 11:20 PM. Reason: Misspoke, wrong tire size

  42. #842
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    The release nubbin for the front mount is technically reusable (in fact, they used to ship them unassembled) but the primary use is as a breakaway to keep the wheel from locking.

    I believe that the draw nuts are not available separately, but let me know if you can't get them, I have a set about.

  43. #843
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    The stock fender stays terminate cleanly without antennae, and I'd like to match that, just in prettier metal. The breakaway idea is great for the front, do you know if this can be popped on and off several times or is it a one time safety feature? Either way it might be worth the cost of admission once I get my forms to cooperate.
    SKS Front Fender Breakaway Mount, Sold Each | Mountains Plus Outdoor Gear

    They are for repeat use. Over time, the plastic grip may ease off a bit and make it easier to release the fender, but they are easily replaced when they get to that state.

  44. #844
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    I am ashamed of myself. My bike was filthy, and by filthy, I mean dirtier than Ugandan drinking water. I had ridden it a few days in this garbage mist that we have been getting. The roads were not soaking wet, but wet enough to spray. I pretty much keep the bike clean, but to be honest, I have been neglecting the drivetrain. Well, as much drivetrain as a fixed gear has. My chain? I am glad that I did not take any before pictures. I made the biggest mess that I have ever made trying to clean it. Now, there a few things that I either am not good at, haven't tried yet, and just suck at. Changing a flat is one. Drivetrain adjustment/maintenance is another. I have never taken a chain off any bike that I have ever owned. Today that changed, after a call to the shop of course because I could not figure out exactly what I was doing wrong. Once that was figured out, off it came. Gross is all I can say. The amount of grease and black crap that I have no idea where it came from or what it is, that is nasty. Soaked it in warm water with a healthy amount of Dawn. It did almost nothing. Scrubbed it with a cleaning brush and most of it came off. Oh it came off, all over my hands and the sink. The outside is finally clean, but there is still crap on the inner part of it, between the links, not sure what you call that, where it interfaces with the chainring. That one chainring....and the rear cog, wow, disgusting. Got that fully cleaned and looking almost new. Wiped down the hubs, inside the chainstay, inside the fork, removed the brake and wiped that all down, under the saddle, the entire frame, and the wheels. It is sitting on my rack right now, chain is hanging up to dry after I wiped it down fully with a microfiber cloth that is now wrecked. I feel like it needs something else to clean it with. I can't use gasoline or kerosene as I live in an apartment and this was done in my kitchen. I miss living in a house with a garage, but I don't miss my ex wife who still lives there.

    I am going to promise that it will NOT get this bad again. I will keep up on the maintenance now that I know how to do it and am comfortable enough with it.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  45. #845
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    ^ next time, get a degreaser (simply green or whatever) and a wide-mouth plastic bottle (like from a sports drink or vitamin water). Toss the chain in there with a couple of inches of degreaser, give it a good shake, and then let it soak for a day. Fish it out of the bottle and wash it off. And then I actually like to blowdry the chain to force any rogue water drops out of the nooks and crannies. Then oil it up.

    But that being said, I've pretty much given up on thorough chaincleaning. I just keep a rag handy, and when the roads are gross I make sure to give the chain a daily wipedown. Keeping up that routine will work wonders.

  46. #846
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    That is a pretty good idea. Will get that stuff when I go to the store. Thanks newfangled!

    ETA - says I have to spread out more rep before I can give it to you again. Damnit
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  47. #847
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    Put that new chain on at .75, but still some complaining from the drivetrain. That chainsuck/lock on the middle ring. Hoping it will sort itself out after a few more rides, especially since the last time I looked, I could not find a spare compatible Shimano ring anywhere. The LBS was not enthusiastic about the performance of the Blackspire option, any opinions? I'd probably try one before giving up on the whole drivetrain.

  48. #848
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    Chain is currently marinating nicely in a bowl of Simple Green slightly diluted with some water. I totally forgot about that stuff, and it works wonders because I cleaned up a little with it, like the sink and other stuff. Thanks for the reminder newfangled.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  49. #849
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    What have you done to your commuter today?

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Put that new chain on at .75, but still some complaining from the drivetrain. That chainsuck/lock on the middle ring. Hoping it will sort itself out after a few more rides, especially since the last time I looked, I could not find a spare compatible Shimano ring anywhere. The LBS was not enthusiastic about the performance of the Blackspire option, any opinions? I'd probably try one before giving up on the whole drivetrain.
    What crankset is it (model/series)? I'm assuming it's your mountain bike this time of year... If so, I've put Race Face evolve rings on several customers bikes with no complaints, work well. They're typically cheap enough to do all of them in a go, which is nice.

  50. #850
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    ^^It's an XTR M960, which I understand was only made one year.

    "The Shimano M960 XTR Crankset was unique. Its nine speed rings didn't share bolts so each ring had it's own BCD. Owning one of these beautiful cranksets is a great reason to hold off on upgrading to 10speed. But what do you do when your rings wear out? "
    Buy a whole set from... Blackspire SuperPro Chainring for M960 | Blackspire

    I see Wolftooth has one now too, but it has to be run with a 10 speed chain, which they claim will work fine on a 9 speed drivetrain...
    Wolf Tooth Components 102bcd Drop-Stop Chainring for Shimano XTR M960 Cranks in Tree Fort Bikes Chainrings (cat1323)

  51. #851
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    What have you done to your commuter today?

    I may have the unpopular opinion as far as shop rats go, but why not just replace the ring with the blackspire? It isn't a perfect match, but being able to use the chainring will be far better than chainsuck. Will the shift gates line up? Nope, but we got by for many years without them. The shifting will suffer slightly, but that's about it.

  52. #852
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    I've run a 10 speed chain, FD and chain rings with a 9 speed rear set up before - it works perfectly fine, shifted exactly the same as with a 9 speed chain. On the unramped, pinned front rings I don't think it matters too much if front shifting is not as precise, I don't change front rings very much on my commutes.

  53. #853
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    No major changes, but I've been constantly tweaking the new frame since I built it a few weeks ago. This week was been changing bar angle, rewrapping the bars to adjust the padding, and adjusting saddle position. And on a nice and icy 3 hour ride, today it finally felt like my bike. (winter is rough time to break-in a new bike)

  54. #854
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    My 6700 ultegra will probably be needing new rings and cassette this year or next and the geeky gear freak in me (sponsered by visa) keeps whispering Di2, Di2 you know you want to in my ear. I will probably succumb to the evil little succubus at some point.

  55. #855
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    My 6700 ultegra will probably be needing new rings and cassette this year or next and the geeky gear freak in me (sponsered by visa) keeps whispering Di2, Di2 you know you want to in my ear. I will probably succumb to the evil little succubus at some point.
    Not worth it at all, not even close. For race applications it's great. But on a commuter? Too much to fail so easily. And the set up on the electronic shifting is a nightmare. Sure it's nice when it works, but when it doesn't you're screwed.

  56. #856
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    I don't have a dedicated commuter, I either use my road bike or my hardtail MTB. I go on after work group road rides once or twice a week, where we maintain 35 to 40kmph, so it's a pretty good pace. But yep I don't really need it
    Quite a few in the group have gone to Di2 over the last couple of years, I've not heard of any issues with reliability and the couple of times I've helped install and set up the 6870 group it wasn't any trickier than setting up a mechanical set up, a few more cables to deal with but trimming the derailleurs was easy.

  57. #857
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    Left the chain in that solution and this morning I removed it and rinsed it off. Looks almost brand new. I can still see a bit of gunk in there but for the most part it is pretty clean. Thanks again for the suggestion newfangled - gonna try the rag idea as well to help keep the chain in decent condition. Will probably do the other bike here this week because that one is in much better condition.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  58. #858
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Left the chain in that solution and this morning I removed it and rinsed it off. Looks almost brand new. I can still see a bit of gunk in there but for the most part it is pretty clean. Thanks again for the suggestion newfangled - gonna try the rag idea as well to help keep the chain in decent condition. Will probably do the other bike here this week because that one is in much better condition.
    Don't forget to re-lubricate the chain. Bike chain oil is penetrating and will help bring the grit out of the rollers. Apply a small drop to each roller. Spin the cranks a couple dozen revolutions, then wipe the excess lube off.

    In the winter, I wipe the chain after every ride. If the chain is exceptionally dirty, I use a bit of degreaser on a rag: wipe, re-lube, wipe = happy chain.

  59. #859
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    Yep, it is currently air drying right now on the rack. Once it is completely dry, I will wipe it down again to try to remove any excess grease left over. I will then put it back on the bike and carefully lube it. Since I got the chain ring and cog completely clean, I want the chain to be as clean as possible when I put it back on.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  60. #860
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    Still fiddling with fenders

    I squeezed in a few hours of woodworking this weekend, many more spent on the Christmas spirit than I had anticipated.

    Oak, Cherry, and Ash blanks came out all right. The hickory were the most promising until they (front and rear) split down the center while sanding. Once I get it right, I'll put up some pics of the steps and end product.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What have you done to your commuter today?-img_0057.jpg  


  61. #861
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Not worth it at all, not even close. For race applications it's great. But on a commuter? Too much to fail so easily. And the set up on the electronic shifting is a nightmare. Sure it's nice when it works, but when it doesn't you're screwed.
    Di2 is pretty easy to set up, and has been highly reliable for my customers, including one with a very special setup:



    One of its strengths is that the servos know where they're supposed to move to, and they go there like clockwork, regardless of how much crud your bike's been plastered with. Cables and housings start off working well, but with enough degradation, they start to get inaccurate.

    The cables and stuff are very, very waterproof.

    If the battery is running low on power, the front shifting will shut down, while the rear can manage several hundred more shifts. And the battery typically needs charging only every 1000 miles or so, and the rider can check battery level while riding by just holding a shift button for a couple seconds and looking at the indicator LED. I think the typical commuter would find it hard to strand themselves due to battery depletion.

    Besides, the economy needs stimulating! It's your patriotic DUTY to have Di2!

  62. #862
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    ^^Cool!

    Cleaned mine up, so it is sure to be sloppy and salty on the next ride!. Also trying out some new ergon grips. Still like the ESI silicone ones I had on there, so will go back to those if these aren't comfy.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What have you done to your commuter today?-p1050538-1280x960-.jpg  


  63. #863
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    What have you done to your commuter today?

    Installed a rear rack and a cargo box i got for a christmas gift on my commuter. Should get some weight off my back
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  64. #864
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    Extreme boredom is setting in even though I am riding still. Got this crazy idea to try something, so off to the web I went. Item came a few days ago, and this is my first day off so I put it on. Had also made a return/exchange at the LBS for the second part.



    This bike is not ideal for commuting, let alone drinking any water, so I had to come up with an alternative. Carrying it in my bag is fine and all, but what about when I want a drink while riding? Headed to Amazon for this: Amazon.com : Minoura SBH-80 Single Water Bottle Cage Mount for Behind Seat : Bike Water Bottle Cages : Sports & Outdoors and the LBS for this in matte black: Specialized Bicycle Components

    There were several reviews on the cage mount, but almost all of them complained of losing their water bottle, it shoots out over a bump or railroad tracks, etc. I had used the Specialized Z cage in the past, and to be honest, the bottle stays put. That is what gave me the idea to try it. Tomorrow will be the maiden voyage with a full water bottle on there. If I lose it, no big deal because it is an older bottle anyway. The big black area on the bottle is just the graphic that is rubbing off.
    My buddy from the shop just shot me a text back that he can order it in white with black/red accents. Done! This matte black one will look great on the Felt.



    You can see that the upper part of the holder extends over the natural ridge in the bottle holding it in place. I tugged on it quite a bit and it is not going anywhere. This should be ideal for my riding style/terrain since the roads here are like a war zone and I cannot believe that I have not bent a wheel yet.

    Also swapped headset spacers lowering the bars a bit and might have removed the front brake. I have not used it in a week on purpose to see how I would ride without it.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  65. #865
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    So I was out of town for about a week visiting family. Got back, and was looking forward to an early morning trail ride when I discovered this:



    Just to recap, late last winter one of my two-year-old Ice Spiker Pros suddenly turned into swiss cheese:


    Over the course of about 2 weeks 8 sidewall tears like that opened up. I sent the info to schwalbe, and they sent me a warranty replacement tire - whoo.

    But now the warranty replacement tire they sent me has had a total bead failure (with maybe 1000km on it):


    I've still got one of my original ice spiker pros, and this winter I was worried that it would turn into swiss cheese too, so I've been keeping an close eye on it. But I really wasn't expecting that the brand new one would fail.

    Time for another warranty email to schwalbe...

    (and thankfully I've still got my fixie with its 6-year-old nokians that still look brand new)
    Last edited by newfangled; 12-28-2014 at 07:39 PM.

  66. #866
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    It looks like the bead on your rim is sharp and cutting the bead of the tire. The bias ply failures, may also, come from running the tire with too little psi and in part with the sharp rim. Make sure you're staying within the min/max psi rating for the tire.

    Good luck with the warranty. For $170 those tires should not fail like that.

  67. #867
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    Just get new nokians, even the cheap ones like the w240 wont do that. I have never liked the ice spikers.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  68. #868
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    It looks like the bead on your rim is sharp and cutting the bead of the tire.
    Yeah, no. I've already had one of these sidewalls turn to dust for no reason. As far as I'm concerned this is just more bad design or QC. And since Schwalbe had zero issues warrantying the first one, I'm anticipating the same for this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    Just get new nokians, even the cheap ones like the w240 wont do that. I have never liked the ice spikers.
    When I actually wear one of these out I'll replace them with a 45nrth nicotine to get some extra width. But as long as they keep falling apart, I'm going to keep trying to get replacement from schwalbe.

  69. #869
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    Just get new nokians, even the cheap ones like the w240 wont do that. I have never liked the ice spikers.
    ??? For grip on ice the ice spikers beat the Nokians. They do seem a little more fragile. I've torn a few knobs off mine.

    The 45North concave studs grip like glue on the fatbike. I'm not sure if that is what they use on the nicotine.

  70. #870
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    ??? For grip on ice the ice spikers beat the Nokians. They do seem a little more fragile. I've torn a few knobs off mine.

    The 45North concave studs grip like glue on the fatbike. I'm not sure if that is what they use on the nicotine.
    I had the regular ice spikers from 2008 to what 2012 or so and now I'm running the w240. I'd say the w240 is better both on ice (ice on pavement) and snow. And roll very significantly better on ice/snow free pavement. I'm never going back to spikers. And technically the w240 is supposed to be one notch below the ice spikers. I have also used the more high end nokians and the "low end" 160 and those pretty much beat the ice spikers too, the 160 is really good for mixed surfaces in the city and the higher end nokians would be me first and only choice for serious off road use with ice. The rubber is just better imo.

    I have used studded tires for about 17 years now. In cold northern europe. When I get schwalbe i get them only because there are no other alternatives when I buy them.

    I have also used some of the higher end commuter/slick/road tires from schwalbe and while they are ok and all they are not even close to the equivalents from continental. Better grip, better grip in the rain and longer life. imo of course.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  71. #871
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    I'd agree that the Nokians roll better than the ice spikers. The rubber is also a little more like a car tire. I traded the nokian extremes for the Ice Spiker Pro Evos and they seem to grip better on icy climbs. The rubber is a little softer and they are also lighter.

    The M&G 160s are great on the road but too narrow for off-road.

  72. #872
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ very nice. What year is the trek?
    Just looked it up, it's an '88: Vintage Trek worth perusing if you have some work to avoid.

    In the offer/counter-offer process of acquiring an identical one, because n+1, right?

  73. #873
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post

    The 45North concave studs grip like glue on the fatbike. I'm not sure if that is what they use on the nicotine.
    Now why'd you have to go and tell me that? I was perfectly happy with my skittery original Dillingers until now! They are better than no studs, but go down pretty easily.

  74. #874
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    If your dillengers have stud pockets, well, I know what I did. They are a big confidence booster.

    You don't have to populate all of them. The center row gives a lot of grip. I liked it so much that I went back for another 100.

  75. #875
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    Well, yesterday actually

    Santa brought the LED Sol 48 by Lite:



    As packed:



    Unpacked:



    Test firing:



    Alternate Flash/No flash pictures of bike with Sol 48's on high steady high setting:













    They use micro USB connectors. The front and rear pair are sided so that the turn signals function properly. My front pair was marled incorrectly. However the snap on and off mountings made the switch from side to side a well, snap!

    They have a high low, left and right signal, 4 way flasher and rear only in flash mode (a 'Day' setting). The turn signals fade high low is faster than the 4-way or rear only. The turn signals override the flashing modes and the other side goes solid. In rear only mode, the front turn signals do not function.

    My impression is that the fronts are bright enough in the day as they are brighter than the rears.

    No video yet.

  76. #876
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    Pretty cool, Brian.

    So schwalbe is sending me a replacement. And it makes me wonder if I should maybe put that new-in-box Ice Spiker on craigslist, and use it as an excuse to upgrade (or maybe side-grade) to a Nicotine. They're wider which is good, but have half the studs which I'm not sure about. There's a serious lack of reviews for the nicotines, and even online they're only available a few places.

  77. #877
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    I looked up the Nicotine and it does use the concave studs. I can't compare apples to apples because I had them on the fatbike but they do seem to bite better than the conventional ones. Not sure what their longevity will be.

  78. #878
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    I finally added a secondary tail light for commuting, a Cateye Omni 3. Only $10 on Amazon and it seems like a pretty decent light, uses AAA batteries instead of USB rechargeable but if the advertised run times are anywhere near accurate one set should last me a whole season on flashing. I think it's a good compliment to my Cygolite HotShot.

    Also got a Cateye Volt 100 for Christmas which will be my new helmet light, had been using a Gloworm X1 on low which was overkill. I prefer the self contained light for when I need to dig in my bag.

    Now I need to dig out the reflective tape and go to town on my new rear rack. I will be mistaken for a UFO hopefully at some point.

  79. #879
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    I looked up the Nicotine and it does use the concave studs. I can't compare apples to apples because I had them on the fatbike but they do seem to bite better than the conventional ones. Not sure what their longevity will be.
    Yeah, it's tough. I checked two LBS and they don't have the nicotine in stock, and with shipping and exchange I figure it would cost me $60+ more than I'd get for selling the schwalbe. I'm not the biggest fan of the ice spiker, but I may just stick with the devil I know.

    And even though my big bike is currently wearing an Ardent I took it for a ride today, and had a blast. The snow condition is pretty perfect, and I may just have to take my "summer" hardtail out for a spin later this week too.

  80. #880
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    Has anyone tried these in 120 tpi studded (700x38) for a cross bike, they look pretty nice...

    45NRTH

    guitar ted's review 45NRTH ?Gravdal? Tires: Final Review | Gravel Grinder News

    bedwards, my Dillingers are 100% studded, but with the older low profile (and not concave) studs. I haven't looked into replacement ones.

  81. #881
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    So I'm still trying to sell my old 29er frameset (just locally, this isn't spam) and it occurred to me that its rigid fork would work fine on my 26er hardtail (axle-crown is ~10mm longer than it would be for a rigid 26er fork). I'm not sure why that never occurred to me before, because I've often thought about picking up a surly fork for that bike. So I might have to keep the fork, and knock a few bucks off the asking price for just the frame.

  82. #882
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    Vacation time means plenty of time to goof around, and so this:


    becomes this:


    The 29er fork is pretty natural with the 26er setup. And I had an old bb5 caliper lying around in the partsbin, so each fork has its own brake/housing/cable. That setup is pretty handy, because I can swap forks by just unhooking the cable at the lever and don't have to readjust anything. Now I just need to get a second crownrace, and I could do the swap in a minute or two.

    But one of my forks (not sure which one) isn't aligned properly. The tire was very nicely centered in the suspension fork, and is noticeably not centered in the rigid one. Not sure what to do about that - I don't want to redish the wheel everytime I move it back and forth, and I'm too ocd to let it not be centered, so I might maybe possibly try manhandling the steel fork a bit.

  83. #883
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    Scotty, We need more power!

    Well I got late day, and night video. The day video was shot on the day setting with no F Stops to increase exposure and lighten the video. I am guessing that this would be like a senior with some night vision issues using sunglasses into that low sun, especially so at the end as the sun was going down. My headlights were in night mode (straight ahead). The LED SOL 48's were at about 15 degree out turn, as suggested by Lite. You can see the left turn signal just at the end of the day part. In the day, they are outshone by Hi-Vis clothing, even in shadow of a sinking sun. In the day they add a bit of visibility once the bike was a second or so from the camera (that was turned like a driver looking to the right before pulling out). If they are looking elsewhere that second, they will not be seen. About what the reflectors do at night. Day performance is poor to fair. Though they look great in static mode and so would look great in a court room. "You couldn't see this?"

    The high steady state added some visibility at night in full broadside view as I coasted down the drive. UFO? Sort of thing. Both levels look OK at night but the high is a bit better for distance. No surprise there. The turn signals are visible at night from the side not so much from the front with good headlights washing things out. The rear is fine and should look good to overtaking motorists.



    Hard to beat good Hi-Vis on sunny days and powerful 180+ degree head and taillights. I might rotate the fronts especially out to 30 maybe 45 degrees to get more impact on cross street drivers.

  84. #884
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    ^^Impressive visibility, especially in the far-away footage.

  85. #885
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    Swapped my front wheel out on the Jamis with the Felt. The American Classic wheel on there has an obvious front hub issue as something is loose. Going to take it into the shop when the open back up for the year and see what is going on. Mismatched wheels now and it is pretty obvious with one being black and the other red with big white decals. Hipster modification installed.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  86. #886
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    Oops! loaded the wrong video file!



    My comments should make more sense now. Maybe.

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    Finally got the fenders mounted.

    I struggled with the hardware until the snow came back. So now the Bossanova will look good in the garage for a while.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What have you done to your commuter today?-img_0064.jpg  

    What have you done to your commuter today?-img_0065.jpg  

    What have you done to your commuter today?-img_0067.jpg  


  88. #888
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    ^ that is the first bike that has actually looked good with fenders to me. Nice work
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  89. #889
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    ^ You don't like this?


  90. #890
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    While that is nice, it doesn't do anything for me. Too much for me. As long as you like it that is all that matters.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  91. #891
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    bedwards, my Dillingers are 100% studded, but with the older low profile (and not concave) studs. I haven't looked into replacement ones.
    Oh! We took 3 bikes out to a frozen lake this weekend. The fatbike was only studded in the center rows and had far fewer studs than the ice spikers or the nokians but it hooked up the best. I had to make sure not to lean into turns because the sides are only partially studded.

  92. #892
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    ^ stop trying to convince me to get a concave-studded tire, darn you. I was pretty convinced that I'd be happy with my warranty replacement icespiker.

  93. #893
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    ^Sorry, I actually like my ice spikers. You'll be fine.

  94. #894
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    ^ which reminds me, that the icespikers are better snow tires that I'd given them credit for. They're really only okay in fresh snow, and I assumed that was because they were mainly designed as an ice tire.

    But last week we got 5" of new snow, and I went out for a ride with an Ardent on the front. It was noticeably worse than the icespiker, and really wanted to wander, and it had a tendency to "surf" itself into washouts.

    I'd always thought the Ardent (which actually looks pretty similar to the Nicotine) would be a better snow tread than the Icespiker, but I was wrong. And I'm still a bit suspicious that for a rear tire a directional tread would be better than the icespiker, but I might be wrong about that too.

  95. #895
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Oh! We took 3 bikes out to a frozen lake this weekend. The fatbike was only studded in the center rows and had far fewer studs than the ice spikers or the nokians but it hooked up the best. I had to make sure not to lean into turns because the sides are only partially studded.
    Yeah, but is the fatbike wearing the newest studs? I've found the Ice Spikers and Nokians have both gone from Wow! to OK after 1 season.

  96. #896
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    True, yes...but
    Concave Aluminum Carbide Studs
    Using the same two-piece construction method as the standard carbide-aluminum product, this stud features a carbide tip with a concave shape on the crown. The concave crown creates a very sharp attack angle to the surface, resulting in an unparalleled amount of traction. Any wear that occurs to the carbide crown creates an even sharper edge continuously augmenting acceleration, braking and cornering performance as it ages.

    Not that I am trying to talk anybody into them.

  97. #897
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I've found the Ice Spikers and Nokians have both gone from Wow! to OK after 1 season.
    My ancient mount&grounds look brandnew, but my icespikers looked pretty beaten up after only one year. And it wasn't because the studs were worn, but because they'd sunk too far into the tire.

    I fixed that by taking an exacto-knife and cutting some rubber off the knobs to expose the studs a bit, and it helped a lot.

    These aren't great photos but here is the tire:


    It's pretty tough to see, so I've highlighted the ones that I cut:
    What have you done to your commuter today?-markup.jpg

    And a bit more of a closeup:


    I just cut every second knob to see if it would work. For the center knobs I cut perpendicular to the tire, so that they'd work as either drive/brake depending on which way the tire was put on. I left the outer knobs alone because they're still fine. And the two offset rows I cut at a 45deg angle, alternating direction for each knob.

    It really did improve both tires (before one had a sidewall disintegration), and I'd totally recommend giving it a shot.

  98. #898
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    ^^Thanks, I'll take a closer look at mine.

  99. #899
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    Finally cleaned one of them. Just gotta clean the other one, but didn't have time this morning.

    Currently scheming to replace the bars on my road bike with a flat bar. Just need a new quill stem with a little rise, because I don't like the dropped stem on that bike. Then I'ma get the biggest cross tires I can put on the bike and I'll have a goofy looking typical ten speed road bike turned single speed flat bar commuter. Just what I need.
    dang

  100. #900
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    What have you done to your commuter today?



    Ready to rock for the non -30 weather next week!
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  101. #901
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    Interesting stop by the bike shop last night. I pulled in just around close and my mechanic buddy was there reorganizing the shop. He had a bunch of stuff out that he was getting ready for an expo in a couple of weeks. Used bike part, odds and ends, etc. I asked him if he had a quill stem, yep. A short stem and a little rise, just like I was looking for. Looked at the other parts in the bin. Brand new set of tektro caliper brakes, brake levers, brake cables, etc, etc, everything I need to convert from drop bars to flat bar except the bar and the grips. They had that and a 16t freewheel from a singlespeed bike someone had bought and ditched those parts for some they already had and wanted to transfer over. I also got a take-off saddle (some Oval saddle, definitely better than my GT saddle form the 1990's that came with my road bike and is now on my mtb) and a set of pinned platform pedals, which are heavy and purple, but only cost me $1. Also, he said they haven't sold really any folding cyclocross tires at all (not a very high demand around here) and I might be able to get an otherwise expensive set of them for around $50. 700x35 with some hefty, but not obtrusive knobs (though he seemed perplexed as to why I wanted knobs for commuting).

    All in all he sold me everything for about $50, which is good, because now I don't have to limit myself to one brake, I don't have to use old brake pads, and I can replace my old cables and saddle. So... this is going to happen sooner than expected.

    Does anyone have recommendations for a flat bar that's good for single speed road bike commuting? I'm thinking cheap and aluminum, and then I'll get some ODI grips to put on it, and maybe some bar ends for if I want to get all catty and stretch out.
    dang

  102. #902
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    Salsa promoto is a pretty run of the mill flat bar. There are cheaper ones, and there are lighter, but the base model is a good value.

  103. #903
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Does anyone have recommendations for a flat bar that's good for single speed road bike commuting? I'm thinking cheap and aluminum, and then I'll get some ODI grips to put on it, and maybe some bar ends for if I want to get all catty and stretch out.
    If your stem uses 25.4mm bars, you might be interested in a setup like mine. I got an old Titec straight-gauge titanium handlebar from Ebay, which is the same diameter all the way across (22.2mm), and uses a shim at the center to fit 25.4mm stems.

    The genius in this, is that I can put a set of bar-ends inboard of the controls, allowing a narrow hand position when I'm up to speed and want to get more aero. The faster I go, the more it helps.

    Anyway, the old Titec bars came in two variants: butted 118-gram, or straight-gauge 150-gram. If you plan to use bar-ends, the straight-gauge model is the better pick since it didn't require the BERT inserts in the ends to resist crimping. Cheaper and more plentiful too.

  104. #904
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    So it is freezing out, and I am bored out of my mind. Had a few ideas and they finally made an appearance today.

    1. Minoura saddle rail water bottle cage mount. I like this a lot so far. Reviews online said that bottles tended to shoot out over bumps and rougher roads. I didn't want to have to worry about it, so I opted for a Specialized Right Zee cage in red/black/white. I tried this out a few weeks ago, and it works perfectly. Water bottle didn't budge. I have used these cages on my mountain bikes in the past and they work well. The side access makes it a bit more secure and fairly easy to get the bottle out.

    2. Re-wrapped the bullhorns. I messed up a few spots when I initially put the Lizard Skin wrap on it, and finally got around to fixing it. A few gaps were hidden along the bottom of the bar and once I saw it there was no way it couldn't be fixed.

    3. Red electrical tape on the bars. I am not 100% sold on this. It adds a pop, but might just be that one thing that takes it over the edge. The bike is already pretty flashy, and not sure that adding more will add to the cause.

    4. Removed the front brake. I will catch some flack for this probably, but it is something that I have wanted to do for some time now but didn't have the courage to do. About a month and a half ago, I stopped using the brake all together to see if I could do it. After making some serious riding adjustments, I went 2 weeks without touching it. I left it on for another few days, and then pulled it. I did a Sunday commute to work in light traffic to see how it really was. Again, it was not needed so I am going to continue on with it off the bike. I can always add it back on if needed but I am hoping that I will not need to. Been trying to work on hop stopping instead of skidding to prevent unnecessary tire wear. Adjusting the way I ride and some slight route modifications have made this easier than I had initially thought.

    5. Red stripe of electrical tape along the top lip of the water bottle. This was just done as a fun thing and I figured that there is no way that I would get it on there straight, but I did, so I am leaving it. Why not?





    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  105. #905
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    ^ Really looks sharp TenSpeed. I would give you lip for the front brake removal if I didn't know how flat the Lansing area is, I wouldn't pull it even there. How does the side pull water bottle mount work for you? I have seen some bent wood versions available and have considered copying it to match my fenders. Any advantage over the old standard if not located under the saddle?

  106. #906
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    Got a full week in on my new lake 303's. They are pretty ugly but man do they make my toes feel wonderful.

    I measured my feet using a dial caliper and went off of their sizing cart. It was a size smaller then my normal shoes which had me worried while I was waiting for them to come because almost every review I read said to go a size up from your normal size. I'm glad I went by their numbers because they fit great even with my bulkiest wool socks.


  107. #907
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    ^ Really looks sharp TenSpeed. I would give you lip for the front brake removal if I didn't know how flat the Lansing area is, I wouldn't pull it even there. How does the side pull water bottle mount work for you? I have seen some bent wood versions available and have considered copying it to match my fenders. Any advantage over the old standard if not located under the saddle?
    Thanks! Yeah, it is really flat here. I think we have about 14" of elevation throughout the city. For the water bottle cage, I think it is meant more for full suspension mountain bikes with a smaller area due to the rear shock. Some of the smaller bikes really don't have the room, and if they do, you cannot get the bottle in or out with a regular cage. I like it since it is quite secure once it is in there, but easy to get out. See picture below.

    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  108. #908
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    4. Removed the front brake. I will catch some flack for this probably
    Sorry, but you deserve it.

    Michigan Legislature - Section 257.662

    (2) A bicycle shall be equipped with a brake which will enable the operator to make the braked wheels skid on dry, level, clean pavement.
    I wouldn't want to have to explain that "My legs are just like a brake, and no I'm not an irresponsible jackass" to the courts or an insurance company.

  109. #909
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Sorry, but you deserve it.

    Michigan Legislature - Section 257.662

    (2) A bicycle shall be equipped with a brake which will enable the operator to make the braked wheels skid on dry, level, clean pavement.

    I wouldn't want to have to explain that "My legs are just like a brake, and no I'm not an irresponsible jackass" to the courts or an insurance company.
    Yep, that is exactly how a fixed gear works. You stop pedaling, and skid. To me that is clear as day. A front brake does not make my bike skid, which it needs to, according to the "law". The front brake only slows me down when it is pressed, right?
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  110. #910
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    Newfangled, thanks for the link. I will have words with my LBS over pedals without reflectors. Not that any of this is enforced. As for meeting the letter of the law, Tenspeed has it assuming his rear wheel can be made to skid, being the braked wheel. If this were not adequate legally, all of the cruiser/ hipster bikes and the cheap bmx types would be illegal around here.

    I have already ordered some planet bike blinkies and a bell for my yet to arrive Unit. I will be one of two law abiding cyclists in my neighborhood, the other guy has sense enough to wait for Spring.

  111. #911
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Yep, that is exactly how a fixed gear works. You stop pedaling, and skid. To me that is clear as day. A front brake does not make my bike skid, which it needs to, according to the "law". The front brake only slows me down when it is pressed, right?
    The word "equipped" isn't in there just for funzies. Your bike is not equipped with a brake. Talk to a lawyer if you want, but you are breaking the law because of fashion.

  112. #912
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    That isn't the only rule I am breaking. I run clipless. There are no reflectors on there. Legally, they should not be sold here, according to the law.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  113. #913
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    That isn't the only rule I am breaking. I run clipless. There are no reflectors on there. Legally, they should not be sold here, according to the law.
    Bikes must be sold with pedals and spoke reflectors, and "Sold" also isn't just in there for funzies. After a bike has been sold the law does not require it to have those reflectors, the way the law does require all bikes to be equipped with a brake. One clause is for retailers/manufacturers, and the other is for operators.

    "Seatbelts crease my clothes. If I get into an accident I'll just brace myself. And don't you know that seatbelts hurt more people than they save?"

    Brakeless is the same stupid bs.

    There are plenty of people on this forum who've had to deal with the police or insurance. Just because you think you're invincible and that it will never happen to you, cutting your braking effectiveness in half (more than half) and breaking the law is a jackass move. Running just a coaster brake on a fast bike wasn't the greatest idea, but at least it wasn't also breaking the law.

    Sorry, but you said you were going to get some flak for this, and I'm just making sure that you do.

  114. #914
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    If your stem uses 25.4mm bars, you might be interested in a setup like mine. I got an old Titec straight-gauge titanium handlebar from Ebay, which is the same diameter all the way across (22.2mm), and uses a shim at the center to fit 25.4mm stems.

    The genius in this, is that I can put a set of bar-ends inboard of the controls, allowing a narrow hand position when I'm up to speed and want to get more aero. The faster I go, the more it helps.

    Anyway, the old Titec bars came in two variants: butted 118-gram, or straight-gauge 150-gram. If you plan to use bar-ends, the straight-gauge model is the better pick since it didn't require the BERT inserts in the ends to resist crimping. Cheaper and more plentiful too.
    Hmm... I'll look into that. Might see if I can't get some deal somewhere. Nothing on ebay, except a butted version. Thanks for bringing that up.

    Also I may just fine anything I can get cheap, or spends a bit more for something not alloy.
    dang

  115. #915
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Bikes must be sold with pedals and spoke reflectors, and "Sold" also isn't just in there for funzies. After a bike has been sold the law does not require it to have those reflectors, the way the law does require all bikes to be equipped with a brake. One clause is for retailers/manufacturers, and the other is for operators.

    "Seatbelts crease my clothes. If I get into an accident I'll just brace myself. And don't you know that seatbelts hurt more people than they save?"

    Brakeless is the same stupid bs.

    There are plenty of people on this forum who've had to deal with the police or insurance. Just because you think you're invincible and that it will never happen to you, cutting your braking effectiveness in half (more than half) and breaking the law is a jackass move. Running just a coaster brake on a fast bike wasn't the greatest idea, but at least it wasn't also breaking the law.

    Sorry, but you said you were going to get some flak for this, and I'm just making sure that you do.
    I never said that I am invincible. I understand that there is great risk in doing this, and I am willing to accept the responsibility of it. I also know that I am going to get grief over it, and that won't bother me either. I am running a special vBulletin add on thick skin required for it. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, and you are simply stating yours, completely understood.

    Also, I am curious how a coaster brake would differ here? To be honest, it had worse stopping power than the fixed gear does. I think that it gave me a false sense of security when I had one. Either way, pedaling backwards stopped the bike.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  116. #916
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Also, I am curious how a coaster brake would differ here?
    One is illegal and one isn't.

    I sure hope that you're not going to keep whining about all of the people who use your bike-only paths and park in your bikelanes. Neither of those would be state laws, and the campus pathways probably aren't an actual law of any kind. If you're going to willfully disregard the law then you'd better accept that everyone else can choose to be a jackass too.

  117. #917
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    I'm siding with TenSpeed. From everything I've heard, including the interpretation of the law in my city, riding fixed does qualify as having a braking mechanism, just like a coaster brake (hopefully with a more skilled rider on it).

    Whether they should or not is another story.

    So the only type of rider that is breaking the brake law are the street BMXers who ride brakeless and use their shoe soles to slow down.

  118. #918
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    So it is a bit warmer out, but now snowing, and again, I am bored out of my mind. Worked on the Felt today and am nearly done.

    1. XLAB Delta 100 saddle rail bottle cage mount. This is quite the contraption in comparison to the Minoura I mounted on the Jamis. It comes with a bottle cage, but that was already put to the side to opt for a Specialized Right Zee cage in matte black. After using it on the other bike, I know that this is the right choice. Might have to order another mount like this for the Jamis though, as I really like how solid it is on there. I had to alter the mounting hardware of the cage as the bolts that came with it are for the Delta cage. Luckily the regular bolts and nuts worked really well so I used those.

    2. Reassembled the bike after a much needed drivetrain cleaning. The chain is almost like new again, and just needs to be lubed up before I ride it. Pedals are off the bike and are currently on the fat bike. They are just some Exustars (SPD knockoffs) and will be replaced with another set of Shimano M520's sometime before spring.

    3. Fixed bar tape. Was bugging me since it was not even due to the brake handle.

    4. Removed front brake.





    Currently looking for a matching bullhorn bar like the Jamis that is 31.8. I always said that I would never put Bontrager stuff on any of my bikes, and up until the bullhorns, I never did. I love them though, and damnit, I will get another pair along with a new stem. Also have my eye on a new front wheel, but we will see what happens with that. If it falls through, I will just Plasti-Dip the front wheel to cover the brake track.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  119. #919
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post

    4. Removed the front brake. I will catch some flack for this probably, but it is something that I have wanted to do for some time now but didn't have the courage to do. About a month and a half ago, I stopped using the brake all together to see if I could do it. After making some serious riding adjustments, I went 2 weeks without touching it. I left it on for another few days, and then pulled it. I did a Sunday commute to work in light traffic to see how it really was. Again, it was not needed so I am going to continue on with it off the bike. I can always add it back on if needed but I am hoping that I will not need to. Been trying to work on hop stopping instead of skidding to prevent unnecessary tire wear. Adjusting the way I ride and some slight route modifications have made this easier than I had initially thought.
    Seems like a high risk:benefit ratio to me. The benefit is cosmetic (??), and the risk is accident/injury in an emergency. I use my brakes all the time, but only rarely in emergency mode. I don't think successful riding without the brake for a few weeks is a good way to judge it's necessity.

  120. #920
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Seems like a high risk:benefit ratio to me. The benefit is cosmetic (??), and the risk is accident/injury in an emergency. I use my brakes all the time, but only rarely in emergency mode. I don't think successful riding without the brake for a few weeks is a good way to judge it's necessity.
    I agree with this. What is there to lose by having a back up for an emergency or even an honest mistake?
    dang

  121. #921
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    Found the matching bullhorn bar on sale at the Trek store online, MFG Overstock - Bontrager Race Bullhorn Handlebar - Handlebars - MFG Overstock -Trek Store and got a sweet deal on it, so that was purchased. Think I found the new stem as well on eBay.

    Both bikes are equipped with stopping ability as they are fixed gear.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  122. #922
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Found the matching bullhorn bar on sale at the Trek store online, MFG Overstock - Bontrager Race Bullhorn Handlebar - Handlebars - MFG Overstock -Trek Store and got a sweet deal on it, so that was purchased. Think I found the new stem as well on eBay.

    Both bikes are equipped with stopping ability as they are fixed gear.
    Just out of curiosity, do you mount lights on your bike or do you attach them to your person? Fixed gears are clean looking, but I'm okay with my plain old single speeds and mounting all sorts of stuff on them.

  123. #923
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    Lights are always mounted on the bike itself when I am riding. I don't run a headlight during the day but I do run a bright blinker on the rear. At night, both lights are secured to the bike itself. I sometimes will run a secondary blinker on my bag but have found that it doesn't stay where I want it to unfortunately.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  124. #924
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    Ordered a new flat bar. Went on the budget side, and we'll see if I regret that. It's alloy, it's white, it's 480mm long, and it was like ten bucks on ebay with free shipping. Not expecting much except flat.
    dang

  125. #925
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    Funny that you mention it. Currently running a flat bar on my fat bike, and it is coming back off and a wider riser bar is going back on and I will eventually get some bar ends for it. I think that I am going to wrap the bars with bar tape instead of running standard grips, possibly two layers if I have enough from a spare set of bullhorns.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  126. #926
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    My old mountain bike now has drop bars and bar end shifters on it. Should be fun to learn to use yet another weird shifting device
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  127. #927
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    So my newish frame has an eccentric bottom bracket, and since I'm running gears for the winter it doesn't really matter how I set it up. So initially I put it at it's very lowest, just to see how low that actually was.

    But as I've been fine-tuning things I figured that ultimately I'll want it high (to avoid pedal-strikes) and back (for a shorter effective chainstay). So two weeks ago I moved it to about the 10 o'clock position, if you're looking at it from the driveside. That will change a bit based on ss chainlength, but for now it should be close enough.

    But yesterday I noticed that the new position puts my granny gear insanely close to the chainstay. Whoops. So I pulled the crank off, and thankfully I hadn't chewed up or even scratched the frame, even though there was barely a gap there.

    I had been using a 26t "granny" that I manually shift down to if there is a big snowfall. But that's now been swapped for an old 22t which gives plenty of room.

  128. #928
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    Won an eBay auction. Pics will follow.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  129. #929
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    Lubed my chain and a new rear Gatorskin 23mm. Having some pain from the saddle that I've put a good 3500 miles with little problem. I'm not sure if it's something from having no saddle time since November or if my fit has changed from the accident. Playing it by ear, but I'm in the market for a new one.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  130. #930
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    ^ love my Gatorskins. Did you wear through it or just felt like replacing it? Good luck with the saddle, not having the right one can be a pain in the ass.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  131. #931
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    The bar ends are way easier to adjust to than I expected. Maybe because the bar extensions on the midge are pretty stubby? I love this setup though.

    IMG_20150115_074731178_HDR.jpg
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  132. #932
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    What have you done to your commuter today?

    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    ^ love my Gatorskins. Did you wear through it or just felt like replacing it? Good luck with the saddle, not having the right one can be a pain in the ass.
    That's what I've run on the rear for about a year. It was time to replace. I'd worn a flat spot through the belt, and had a puncture from the steel belt of a tire. As I was changing the tube and inspecting the tire, I found several cuts, gouges, and the like. Run a 4000 on the front and I've never had a problem with flatting, and it gives great performance.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  133. #933
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    Finally finished my commuter! It began life as Giant Nutra Cross, a budget flatbar hybrid circa 1993ish, that lived a simple life as an around the neighborhood bike for a father of 4. It was donated to the local bike co-op that I volunteer at in April of this year, at which point I purchased it to turn into my daily commuter. I tried it a few times but didn't like the upright position so I made plans to convert it into a drop bar commuter, using spare parts from the co-op wherever possible. However, instead of working on it dilligently and getting it back on the road I just picked other bikes from my stable instead, most often commuting on my road bike especially as the seasons changed and the weather got nicer.

    After my cables froze on my mountain bike yesterday I decided that I needed to finish my commuter and save my nicer bikes for races and recreational rides and let the second hand commuter do what it was meant to do. I couldn't get the old 105 STIs that I picked up from the coop to work with the existing 7 speed rear derailleur, so I wound up just using the 105s as standard brake levers and used the friction thumbie shifter that used to work the front derailleur when it was a flatbar as the rear shifter. Worked like a charm. I'll post a pic tomorrow of the before and after.

  134. #934
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCuse View Post
    The bar ends are way easier to adjust to than I expected. Maybe because the bar extensions on the midge are pretty stubby? I love this setup though.
    Are you spending most of your time on the hoods? I've got a midge on my fixie, and I'm always impressed with comfy the hoods are (after originally planning to use it as a dirtdrop on a different bike).

  135. #935
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    Kleebs, I've got to see this thing!
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  136. #936
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    Bontrager Race Aero 42cm bullhorns came in the mail today. Deda Elementi 2014 Zero1 stem ordered last night from eBay. Both are going on the Felt to replace the generic stem and 25.4 bullhorns on there. Stem is the same rise/length as the Ritchey on the Jamis, and the bars are identical. Will wrap them with the same tape to make things very similar. The other item will be posted when it comes and I get it on the bike. Will be stopping in at the shop tomorrow to pick something up in anticipation of its arrival.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  137. #937
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Are you spending most of your time on the hoods? I've got a midge on my fixie, and I'm always impressed with comfy the hoods are (after originally planning to use it as a dirtdrop on a different bike).
    I ride in the drops primarily but they really did nail the angle on the hoods for this bar - other "dirt drops" I've used have kept my wrists in an awkward position on the hoods. I may try to lower it a bit and spend more time on the hoods, assuming I can find a spot where the drops still feel good. Even the flats are actually pretty usable. Its a fantastically designed bar, I'm glad I was able to get one in 25.4 even if it is white
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  138. #938
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    ^ I just wish the Midge's extensions were longer. I've got a woodchipper as my real dirtdrop bar, and the drops don't feel nearly as "right" as the midge, but I sure do love the extensions for ss.

  139. #939
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    Big day for me today and the fat bike. Made a few changes in hopes that it will get me excited about riding it.

    1. Riser bar from my 2010 Specialized Stumjumper FSR that I still had. Wider than the flat bar that I had swapped on. I will need the rise of it...
    2. Deda ZERO100 120mm stem, -8 rise. Hoping that this will stretch me out a little and make the bike feel less like a fat tire beach cruiser and more aggressive.
    3. Adjusted the saddle distance from the bars, moved it in a little closer. Realized that the saddle was way back, and on a setback post, this could be huge.
    4. Gave it a halfway decent wipe down, wiped the chain down and relubed it, although that was a waste of time as I will be riding it to work tomorrow in the mess that is left of the melting snow, with a high of 36 and sunny.

    I will try anything to get this bike to feel more like it should and less like a cruiser. Stem might be a bit too aggressive but I have others to try if it doesn't work. Have not ridden since I twisted my back, which happens to still hurt when I am on my feet too long.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  140. #940
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    Swapped my Specialized Roman Evo 155 saddle with a WTB Pure V that I had lying around. I'd given that saddle a shot for just a few miles months ago and decided against it. But, I guess my shape has changed since the accident and lack of riding, because I spent 20 hard miles on it today over rough roads and don't have a single complaint.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  141. #941
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    Put my new saddle on!!! And got the new bars on. Found out the new stem I got was slightly too big to fit. It was a 1-1/4 quill stem when I needed a 1 inch. Blargh. The bars fit on the old stem, though, but at its highest, it's still a bit low which is why I wanted the riser stem anyway...

    More so, I neglected to realize that the brake levers I got are 24mm outside dimension and I won't be able to fit them on my straight, non butted 25.4mm bar...

    I need grips and bar ends still, and am waiting to get the brakes levers on to even mount the new brakes. Which gave me an idea: what if I can mount the brake levers on the bar ends. Is that a thing? Is there some great flaw in doing this, other than it'll look goofy? It already looks odd to me without drop bars, though i know I'll like it with the short flat bar with bar ends anyway.

    Ooh yeah, got my 16t freewheel installed with no problems!!! Go me.
    dang

  142. #942
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    What have you done to your commuter today?

    Did this to my road shoes. I hated the pedals/cleats, but liked the shoes. I thought this setup gave me the best of both worlds. Definitely something I'm keeping, and I'm finally getting a use out of the shoes I felt bad about having lying around.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What have you done to your commuter today?-uploadfromtaptalk1421534849330.jpeg  

    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  143. #943
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    Are the cleats set too far back?
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  144. #944
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    Nope. Right where I like 'em. I feel like I'm pedaling with my whole foot rather than just my toes, and they're not so far back as to remove the ankle like the midfoot cleat position.

  145. #945
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    New bike with a cheap rack

    Got a skewer mount rack mounted on the Unit. Still waiting for some fenders to come in, or the time to build some up, today's slush was a bit much. While the big studded Nicotines grip and growl like an angry bear, they are equally hard to get out of hibernation.

    I'm still on the fence with the single speed business, but, I'll give an honest two weeks before I decide to do anything about it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What have you done to your commuter today?-img_0071.jpg  


  146. #946
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    Do any of y'all know of any brake levers with a 25.4mm clamp size. I need to either get that or a new handlebar I think.
    dang

  147. #947
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    This came in the mail yesterday. I am happy and bummed at the same time. It is beautiful, and will match nicely. It is, however, not the color that I ordered. I found a matte black version with dark grey decals that ultimately made me decide to get it. First world problems in the bike world right? I think that I am going to keep it, and not go through the hassle of paying to ship it back, and waiting on a refund only to have to buy it or go through the exchange process.

    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  148. #948
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Do any of y'all know of any brake levers with a 25.4mm clamp size. I need to either get that or a new handlebar I think.
    I know your pain right now. Bar is 25.4. Brake lever clamps are 26. They don't fit. I went through this unfortunately. Even with a shim they will be all wonky.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  149. #949
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    I'm thinking about just getting another bar and selling this one for like five bucks. Only paid about ten for it. Maybe if I can find another quill stem with 1" quill and some rise. I just forget how these things are all barely not compatible. My fault really.

    But yeah, I'll figure something out.
    dang

  150. #950
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    I got lucky and had a lever that I could use when this happened to me. I had to stick with the bar that I had though, which was a bummer. I am rectifying this though by moving to all 31.8 stuff. Been slowly doing it over the last 6 months. I will have to get another brake lever if I decide to go back to a front brake on my Felt. That will be the last piece.

    How wide of a bar are you looking for?
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  151. #951
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    Width isn't the biggest issue to me. The one I got was 480mm wide. I kinda like that range for the commuter, could always shorten a longer one.

    The problem is that my options are kinda limited as far as quill stems go, especially wanting a riser stem that has to be 1" quill. So... I dunno, maybe I'll just keep using my stem I have and get a bar with a little rise to compensate for how low the stem is gonna be. And bar ends and all that.
    dang

  152. #952
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    What about using a quill stem adapter that allows you to use 1 1/8 stems and spacers on a fork/headset that uses old school quill stems.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  153. #953
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texan-n-Fla View Post
    What about using a quill stem adapter that allows you to use 1 1/8 stems and spacers on a fork/headset that uses old school quill stems.
    Hmm. Maybe, I've never heard anything good about them, but at this point I'm keeping my options open.
    dang

  154. #954
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    ^ an adapter doesn't sound like it really solves you current problem, but if you want to go that route I've had good success with mine.

    My biggest "complaint" is that they look funky, so I hide mine behind spacers:



    The quill adapter is as narrow as a quill stem (22.2mm) which looks weird with a modern stem and (in my case) 31.8 bar. So I stick some 1" spacers in there and press down on them to hold them in place.

    I've used it with two frames and a couple of different stems and bars, and it's good.

  155. #955
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    It would make it easier to find the stem I want. That'd be good. Might get as NOS quill from ebay. Saw some Kalloy brand stems that looked crumby and utilitarian that have the design features I'm looking for. In that case I'd just get a new 25.4 mtb bar and trim it if I need. Then I think I'd be set.

    Really the only reason I'm doing this is because I found my drop bars to be uncomfortable and didn't like that breaking position. I much prefer flat bar for the hands. Oh well, I'm learning a lot about bikes and the things one needs to check before trying to "fix" old ones. That's why this is a hobby of mine.

    But the transition from 27"wheels with 10 speed gearing to 700 with single speed went so smoothly... Can't win them all.
    dang

  156. #956
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    You can get high rise quill stems. It sounds like you want the cheap Kallor to determine much how height and reach you need.

    This might be an option:

    Nitto Dirt Drop 26.0 (8cm or 10cm)

    Or maybe this one:

    Nitto Dead Stock stem, 25.4mm - 11cm - 16246

  157. #957
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    NDD, you might try something like this.

    I don't necessarily know if it will work for your application, but there is stuff out there.

  158. #958
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    Finally got the XO twist grips all sorted out...

    I like the simplicity of them, they are lighter, and shifting is just fine...

    Still gotta play with the brake lever location...but I won't fuss with that till I am back to wering gloves rather than mitts.

  159. #959
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Finally got the XO twist grips all sorted out...

    I like the simplicity of them, they are lighter, and shifting is just fine...

    Still gotta play with the brake lever location...but I won't fuss with that till I am back to wering gloves rather than mitts.
    Not sure if you are aware of the trim on the front derailleur shifter. Give it a shot if you haven't already.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  160. #960
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    Solutions to problems: How convenient.

    I've got the perfect solution to my problem. There is a bike expo going on this coming Sunday with a parts sale/swap. I can almost assuredly get the parts I need and get rid of a bunch of spare parts I don't need anymore anyway (two old wheelsets, the derailleur from the road bike, a pair of old center pull brakes, some tires I cant use anymore now that the road bike is set up for 700c and not 27", and those handlebars I mistakenly bought, and both quill stems that I can't use/don't want). That said, I wouldn't expect to get much of anything for that, but as long as I can get enough for the right quill and bar combo and maybe some grips and bar ends, I'm all set.

    I think I'll make a "what's a fair price" thread... because I don't know.
    dang

  161. #961
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Not sure if you are aware of the trim on the front derailleur shifter. Give it a shot if you haven't already.
    Its got the cable tension adjuster....didn't even have to adjust the cable tension..just pulled the cable tight and did up the nut on the derailer

    Not sure what you are taking about...didnt say anything elese in the distructions.

  162. #962
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    When riding, if you are getting some chain rub on the front derailleur, slightly twist the front shifter, and it will micro shift, eliminating the chain rub.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  163. #963
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    When riding, if you are getting some chain rub on the front derailleur, slightly twist the front shifter, and it will micro shift, eliminating the chain rub.
    Yeah I dont think the XO has that certainly most twist shifters do?

  164. #964
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    If anything, the X0 will have that. Give it a shot when you ride.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  165. #965
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    If anything, the X0 will have that. Give it a shot when you ride.
    nope xo does not have that feature.

  166. #966
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    Added a mucky nutz fender I made myself.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  167. #967
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    nope xo does not have that feature.
    It looks like they have removed it. The old shifters had it. I wonder why they changed?
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  168. #968
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    How do you like the grips?

  169. #969
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    Quote Originally Posted by in2theforest View Post
    How do you like the grips?
    I was running some grips that look like ergons but were just slip ons...So they were quite fat...

    These grips are normal size so I am noticing a little bit more pressure but nothing I wont adapt to.

    You can change the grips to anything you want....but they would have to be cut to make it all work.

  170. #970
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ I just wish the Midge's extensions were longer. I've got a woodchipper as my real dirtdrop bar, and the drops don't feel nearly as "right" as the midge, but I sure do love the extensions for ss.
    Agreed, though I think the angle of the extensions on the chipper might be what makes the drops kinda awkward (and also what makes the extensions so great for SS-ing). I kind of wanted to find a pair of 31.8 midges for cross bike (I have wood chippers for SS mode and use a normal road bar for geared) but I think I need to chill out with the bar swaps for a while.

    Last time I rode my fatbike to work I was getting pretty frustrated with having to wear a backpack so I got this thing. Seems pretty cool - should help with the short-lived rack envy I often feel on bikes other than my commuter. I doubt its even half full in the picture (has my ridiculously full tool kit, a pump, a fat tube, my thermos mug and a 700c tube I was carrying for someone else in it).

    IMG_20150117_142916769_HDR.jpg

    Sadly I discovered at the trailhead that I can't use my bigger water bottles or my thermos mug in the bottle cage on the seat tube, so I had to move it over onto the fork. I actually kind of like that setup better for cruising, but significantly less once I need to get over logs and stuff. Next time I'll try to remember a smaller water bottle, or go back to my camelback
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  171. #971
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    ^ what's the bag?

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCuse View Post
    Agreed, though I think the angle of the extensions on the chipper might be what makes the drops kinda awkward (and also what makes the extensions so great for SS-ing). I kind of wanted to find a pair of 31.8 midges for cross bike (I have wood chippers for SS mode and use a normal road bar for geared) but I think I need to chill out with the bar swaps for a while.
    I've just recently started running my woodchipper with the levers facing almost straight ahead, instead of angled inline with the extensions. And I think that improves the drops quite a bit. I used to sortof have to stretch around to the front to reach lever, which meant I was always riding in kindof a bear-hug. But with the levers aimed forward my elbows get tucked in a bit, and I can rest on my palms more. It seems like an improvement.

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCuse View Post
    I think I need to chill out with the bar swaps for a while.
    Did you hear that pactbikes (new company from ex-on one/ragley alumni) are bringing back the Luxy? https://twitter.com/pactbikes/status/555001355157655552

    I'm a little excited.
    Last edited by newfangled; 01-20-2015 at 01:08 PM. Reason: confused name

  172. #972
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Did you hear that pactbikes (new company from ex-on one/carnegie alumni) are bringing back the Luxy? https://twitter.com/pactbikes/status/555001355157655552

    I'm a little excited.
    Just what I needed to hear I think the luxy was too shallow for my cross bike but it might be very fun to try on my ss 29er.

    The bag is a Blackburn "outpost" - I had a gift certificate to Bike Tires Direct that was burning a hole in my pocket and it seemed "close enough" to the revelate bags for my purpose (and budget). It is probably good enough, but those revelate bags do look even nicer (and can hold considerably more). I was really impressed with how little I noticed it off-road though. It may have hit my thighs a few times but the bike felt perfectly balanced with it swinging around back there. It may have actually made it more stable, but without making handling feel sluggish. And I haven't done any mountain biking in several years without a camelback + everything I'd need to get out of the woods on my back. Getting that weight off my back without losing the sense of security that a well stocked tool kit gives was probably worth the price of admission on its own. The design seems weird at first (its basically a harness that holds a drybag) but works very well. Bike Tires Direct has some good pictures on their site - better than Blackburn I think https://www.biketiresdirect.com/prod...post-seat-pack.

    I'll probably eventually look at the revelate bags if I want to do any serious bike camping but for the kind of riding I do now (8-10 hrs tops) it is great.
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  173. #973
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    ^ knowing how ungraceful some of my winter dismounts are, when I see all these fatbikes with big seatpacks I wonder how people avoid destroying them? It's interesting to know that you don't really notice it offroad, because that was the other thing I'd wondered about.

  174. #974
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ knowing how ungraceful some of my winter dismounts are, when I see all these fatbikes with big seatpacks I wonder how people avoid destroying them? It's interesting to know that you don't really notice it offroad, because that was the other thing I'd wondered about.
    I gave up years ago on anything sticking off of the bike...cause eventually I just destroy them

  175. #975
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    Warranty replacement studded tire arrived yesterday, and not a moment too soon. Temperatures have bouncing between the mid-40s and mid-teens, and parts of my commute this morning were glacial.

  176. #976
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ knowing how ungraceful some of my winter dismounts are, when I see all these fatbikes with big seatpacks I wonder how people avoid destroying them? It's interesting to know that you don't really notice it offroad, because that was the other thing I'd wondered about.
    I assume that is why they don't recommend using it with a carbon seatpost. But that seatpost weighs the same or more than most of the alloy posts I had available so I reckon its a good bit stronger. I usually end up going down with the bike anyway

    In all seriousness there is enough give in the setup that I don't think you'd be able to destroy it.
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  177. #977
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    It's snowing pretty good outside so I made a cardboard fender for my rear rack in the warehouse out of a Staples box and some packing tape for the ride home. Does that count?

    I really need to settle on what fenders to buy.

  178. #978
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    I spent a good part of my day off at the bike shop, learning. Winter in Michigan means super slow days at the shops, and this was no exception. Since they have a customer specific repair stand and all the tools anyone needs, I opted to take everything there and just do it there. The shop really does not have a good place to take a picture of a bike, and since it is/was snowing out, taking it outside wasn't gonna happen.



    The biggest thing is that front wheel. It is not exactly an ideal commuter wheel, and will more than likely not be used as such. I call it my "tax return present that should have cost me more, but was a total score from eBay". We had some issues getting things just right. An 80mm tube barely fits. I have to have an adapter with me at all times just in case, because my Presta only pump simply will not get a good seal on it to pump it up. I also need to get a different pump. Lesson learned right there, but that is alright. I learned about tubes and tires, and how to change them properly and quickly. That is my biggest thing, I hate hate hate changing tubes. I learned about the proper way to tension the chain on a singlespeed/fixed gear, and what to look for as far as it being either too tight or too loose. Rear Gatorskin rotated to the front, and a brand new one put on the back. The tire is showing some mileage, and is actually no longer rounded. My buddy said that once it is on the front, some of that will even out.

    New Deda Elementi Zero 1 stem installed along with new Bontrager Race aluminum bullhorn bars. These are the same bars I have on the Jamis and I love them. Trek's online store had them massively on sale so there was no way I could pass them up. Stock saddle put back on the bike again, along with the Delta saddle water bottle mount that I had before. Lizard Skin bar tape was removed from the old bars and redone by me. I finally got the bullhorn wrapping pretty down pat. This is by far my best attempt at it with an approval from my buddy whose wrap could easily pass for factory.

    So now the wait for clear weather and dry roads begins. I am very happy with how it turned out. The wheel dropped almost exactly 1 pound off the bike, and since it is rolling mass, I should be able to feel it. The bike is 17 lbs, 8 oz as pictured without pedals. Also pictured is my clean drivetrain. Thanks to whomever suggested the Simple Green soak. I have forgotten who that was, but thanks!
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  179. #979
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texan-n-Fla View Post
    Kleebs, I've got to see this thing!
    I'm a bit late, but here she is! I couldn't find a picture of the bike as I bought. The first picture is from just a few weeks after I bought it at which point I had installed the fenders and rack and switched out the high rise quill stem to something lower. The second is from my garage before I set out this morning. I don't normally have a floor pump bungied to the rack/top tube, but our office basketball was tragically low on air and someone needed to fix it.

    What have you done to your commuter today?-commuter-june-2014-small.jpg

    What have you done to your commuter today?-commuter-jan-2015-small.jpg

  180. #980
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    Lol! That thing looks great. I commonly see those who ride due to extreme financial desperation or loss of license carrying floor pumps.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  181. #981
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    I had to be very careful when I stepped off the pedals at stop lights.

  182. #982
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    No kidding. I think a flat basketball at work would have been the least of your problems.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  183. #983
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    I had some extra bar tape so I taped the gap on my fat bike. From the light mounts which are next to the stem over to the controls. The added hand position will be nice for the remainder of winter while I ride this bike.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  184. #984
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    Went to a few bike shops over in another city an hour or so away today. You never know what you will find there, right?



    All I can say is that they remind me of Mad Max, so that is the official name of the bike. I was calling it the fat white pig, slow poke, fat *ss, slower than sh.... etc. I also swapped back to the 90mm stem and flipped it. The 120 was just too much, and my wrists were both starting to hurt. This should alleviate most if not all of that, hopefully. Oh, the bar ends are from Origin8, and they were only $14.99 which I think was well spent. Unfortunately I had to redo the cockpit, but I got it pretty squared away I think. Had to remove some of the tape to slide everything inward. Test ride to work is Sunday. Forecast is for some light snow.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  185. #985
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    Slightly upgraded the tupperware fender. This works better as it covers more. The staining and finishing will have to wait for a few days.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What have you done to your commuter today?-img_20150125_125540254_hdr.jpg  


  186. #986
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    Parts are in, the Unit goes under the knife tomorrow to go 1x9 for the rest of the winter. Wish me luck.

    In other news, I ordered a Donkey Boxx for it. This new thing will be much lighter than my Wald basket or my Thule panniers, and fairly weathertight. Anyone try one of these yet?

  187. #987
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    ^ I'm an SSer at heart, but 1x is definitely the way to go for a winterbike. I'm counting down until ~april1 when my gryphon will finally be freed of its gears.

  188. #988
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    Well I took the Jamis to my buddies shop for a diagnosis. Turns out everything is OK. Apparently the expander inside the steerer tube somehow was missing a key piece. Since the steerer tube is carbon, there is no star nut. This acts like one, but what happened is that since the piece was missing, it worked its way loose, and essentially fell apart inside the tube. Got that straightened out and fixed up properly. He took the entire headset apart and greased everything and he got it locked up correctly. I shouldn't have any more issues. We did notice that the Ritchey stem was causing a bit of damage to the steerer tube, so I took it off and sanded it several times carefully. That is not easy to do with the potential of ruining the finish of it. I had to sand the inner part where it extends to the bars. After that, I gave the bike a pretty good cleaning using Pedro's Bike Lust cleaner - http://pedros.com/products/clean-and...ers/bike-lust/ and I liked it so much that I ended up buying a bottle of it and some Tri-Flow for the chain. I try to support the shop as much as I can so I pick my stuff up from them. He let me try their bottle first, and this stuff is really nice. Cleaned the bike up really nicely.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  189. #989
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    I used to be a bike lust user, and it does work, but if you get a chance, Progold makes a bike wash (called bike wash, carbon safe) that eats through crap like nothing I've ever seen, short of brake cleaner. Works wonders for removing tar from the customers' road bikes. Nice fresh scent, too (sidebar, the MSDS for Kroil, a corrosion inhibitor/penetrating fluid has my favorite description of a chemical: "Slightly reddish liquid with a refreshing odor packaged as an aerosol").

    I added some nosed liner sections to my rear brake housing, no more rubbing on the brake arm or the tangle bag, and a nice, smooth lever feel improvement, to boot

    On a related note, I bought Cane Creek Direct Vs to replace the Single Digits I had on there, and I can't say enough good things about them. Makes mounting a rear rack interesting, since the stays on my EX1 run right through the housing path, but so far, it's holding up just fine.

  190. #990
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Well I took the Jamis to my buddies shop for a diagnosis. Turns out everything is OK. Apparently the expander inside the steerer tube somehow was missing a key piece. Since the steerer tube is carbon, there is no star nut. This acts like one, but what happened is that since the piece was missing, it worked its way loose, and essentially fell apart inside the tube. Got that straightened out and fixed up properly. He took the entire headset apart and greased everything and he got it locked up correctly. I shouldn't have any more issues. We did notice that the Ritchey stem was causing a bit of damage to the steerer tube, so I took it off and sanded it several times carefully. That is not easy to do with the potential of ruining the finish of it. I had to sand the inner part where it extends to the bars. After that, I gave the bike a pretty good cleaning using Pedro's Bike Lust cleaner - http://pedros.com/products/clean-and...ers/bike-lust/ and I liked it so much that I ended up buying a bottle of it and some Tri-Flow for the chain. I try to support the shop as much as I can so I pick my stuff up from them. He let me try their bottle first, and this stuff is really nice. Cleaned the bike up really nicely.
    That Bike Lust is just spiffy! Seriously, could polish a turd with that stuff. Didn't think about the carbon fork, glad everything worked out for you. Good work on that stem, too. Tolerances can be out on new parts and any scratch through a carbon weave can end catastrophically!

    On to new bike stuff: Just about to finish a new front rack for a light touring rig, a 1988 Trek 400L I picked up to steal the wheelset from. The plan is to update the components (no one wants Biopace, ick. Though, oval rings are coming back), add custom stainless racks and sell it for a nice profit--to fund my rack making endeavors.

  191. #991
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    The Unit is now a nine speed hill climbing monster. My excuses are gone.

    The LBS tinkered with the mount for my Axiom universal fit front fender for quite a while today, including clever stuff like adding a star nut to hold it up and a spacer tube. When all was perfect, a little bit of plastic failed; it nearly ended in tears. Wood butcher that I am, I took their concept and ran with it, turned a wooden spacer, chucked the clip on stuff and bolted it up. If not of the inventiveness of the guys and gals at the LBS, I would still be scratching my head on Thursday.

  192. #992
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    ^ glad to see that you got it worked out. What bike shop do you go to in the 'zoo?
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  193. #993
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    Pedal is our local with great service and bikes. Alfred E. Bike is down the street and carries all sorts of gizmos and whatnots.

  194. #994
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    Was getting kind of tired seat bar drop using a niner flat bar. So today i bought a zero rise surly open bar for the pompino. The open bar should bring the bars up a bit while retaining the favorable reach i now have with the niner bar. Next: thinking of re-gearing from a 68 to a 70 GI and dropping from 28c to 25c tires.

  195. #995
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    Finally installed one of my Christmas presents today: a 38t chainring for my commuter. The Alfine 11 just has way too high a gearing for the bike with a 42/18 combo. Would probably be okay on a group ride with skinny tires, but right now, I've used the top gear maybe once for 5-10 seconds.

  196. #996
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    I'm trying to install V-brakes on my geared commuter, and it's not going so well. First, the bolt holes were too short on my fork. Washers fixed that problem. Now I'm having trouble getting the brake pads to touch the rim.

    Maybe I'm missing something, but V-brakes are usually easy to setup. It seems I either need a longer arm on the brake pad or have to remove my fender and pull the cable super tight just to get adequate contact. Maybe looking at it in full daylight will help, but I'm kind of frustrated with the whole process.

  197. #997
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    Are you converting from standard cantilevers? V-brakes don't play well with standard levers. They really don't play well with standard drop bar levers. It's hard to diagnose exactly what's going on without knowing many details.

    What frame/fork are you using? What brakes are you trying to install? What levers are they matched with? Drop bar/flat bar? Is the fork width beyond the reach of the brakes?

    The retrogrouch in me is screaming, "CANTILEVERS!!!!," over and over again. But, I've gotten pretty good a suppressing that grouchy fellow.

    Good luck, and with some more info. I can give some more advice, if you want it.

  198. #998
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Went to a few bike shops over in another city an hour or so away today. You never know what you will find there, right?



    All I can say is that they remind me of Mad Max, so that is the official name of the bike. I was calling it the fat white pig, slow poke, fat *ss, slower than sh.... etc. I also swapped back to the 90mm stem and flipped it. The 120 was just too much, and my wrists were both starting to hurt. This should alleviate most if not all of that, hopefully. Oh, the bar ends are from Origin8, and they were only $14.99 which I think was well spent. Unfortunately I had to redo the cockpit, but I got it pretty squared away I think. Had to remove some of the tape to slide everything inward. Test ride to work is Sunday. Forecast is for some light snow.
    I'm rocking the same bike over here in the Netherlands as a commuter/beach pig. The Dutchies are always commenting on it. Fatbikes still haven't caught on here.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What have you done to your commuter today?-10471378_10202085989663346_5033145307814042366_n.jpg  


  199. #999
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    Trying out a Donkey Boxx pannier. Essentially a yard sign folded and welded into a box, held to the rack with zip ties.

    I put my tablet and notes in a cloth grocery bag and dropped it in on top of my locks and such, saving about a pound over my heavy cloth panniers, or two pounds over my cheap heavy cloth panniers. About as aero as a garbage truck in reverse with a drag chute, but, simple, cheap, and dry.

  200. #1000
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    Are you converting from standard cantilevers? V-brakes don't play well with standard levers. They really don't play well with standard drop bar levers. It's hard to diagnose exactly what's going on without knowing many details.

    What frame/fork are you using? What brakes are you trying to install? What levers are they matched with? Drop bar/flat bar? Is the fork width beyond the reach of the brakes?

    The retrogrouch in me is screaming, "CANTILEVERS!!!!," over and over again. But, I've gotten pretty good a suppressing that grouchy fellow.

    Good luck, and with some more info. I can give some more advice, if you want it.
    Yeah, converting from cantilevers. I am trying to replace the whole system. The brakes came as a complete set, so they should work together. I'm working with a Cannondale rigid fork (full bike specs: 1996 Cannondale M900 - BikePedia) on a mtb riser bar. Should be easy, right? Even when I reconfigured the brake pad washers to get maximum length, the pads still don't contact the rim.

    I converted a similar bike (C'dale M2000) to V-brakes a while back without any problems. I initially thought that the bolts might be a different distance from each other, but I measured and they're exactly the same (3-1/4", if I remember correctly). V-Brakes are usually so easy to install.

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