What`s your patching policy?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    weirdo
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    What`s your patching policy?

    Self adhesive? Glue on? Don`t patch? Powder? Patch "in the field"?

    I just finished patching a tube and got to wondering what everybody else`s methods are. My method:

    I only change tubes while I`m on the road or trail unless I get more flats than I have extra tube for (usually just one tube, but some for situations it seems prudent to carry two). When I get home, I patch the bad tube and usually install it at a time when I`ll be able to double check it several hours later to make sure it holds, although lately I`ve just been stuffing them back in without worrying about it much since either I`m getting better at it or I`ve been on a lucky streak.

    I use patches from the supermarket that come as a small sheet- invariably the glue dries up before I finish all the patch material since I cut them small and get a LOT of patches from a kit. That isn`t strictly for cheapskateness, but because I`ve seen tubes with stretch marks opposite big patches and I have the idea (could be wrong) that smaller patches are easier on the tubes. I cut them round, about 1cm in diameter. Also, I use baby powder whenever I install a tube at home, but don`t carry it with me when I go out.
    Recalculating....

  2. #2
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    Through in a tube and ride, fast and easy....

    Get home do a full glue on patch, super glue, or whatever.

    Buy a new tube as required.

  3. #3
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Patch in the field, unless I'm short on time or it's somehow inconvenient to do it right then and there (in which case I'll throw on a spare tube). I just have a little patch kit in my tool kit; find the hole, scuff it up a bit w/sandpaper, rub on some rubber cement, let it dry then slap on the patch.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  4. #4
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    tubeless commuter... wire bead holds 60psi and i've never had a flat that didn't seal up a few moments later.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  5. #5
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    I use the self adhesive patches

  6. #6
    dwt
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    When I used to run tubes, I used superglue alone to patch pinches and punctures - everything except for the most outrageous blowouts. 9 times out of 10, you don't need a patch.

    I discovered this when I double flatted on a solo road ride (nail puncture first, then pinch flat of the same tire with the spare tube). No patch kit in my saddle bag. Luckily, I was within easy walking distance to a gas station with a convenience store. Of course they didn't carry tubes or patch kits, but they did have superglue. Rather than bother any friends by calling them on the cell phone, I said "WTF, I'll try the glue." Glued both sides of the snake bite, let it dry, pumped in a little air, and the bond held. Mounted the tire, pumped it up a little more, and it still held. Finally pumped it up as high as the mini-pump could handle; rode 20 miles back home; then pumped it up to 120 psi with the floor pump. Not a seep of air lost.

    Good thing to know because glue patches are a pain in the butt, and glueless don't work.

    Of course, tubeless with sealant is better than all three, but that's another thread.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    Usually don't patch, unless I have a rash of flats. Problem I have had is that once the tube of glue is open, it dries out and I would rather my emergency patch kit not have an open tube in case it won't work in an emergency. I rarely get flats, so I would probably end up buying enough patch kits to offset savings from not buying tubes.

  8. #8
    Obsession? Its a Passion!
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt
    glueless don't work.

    Of course, tubeless with sealant is better than all three, but that's another thread.
    Agreed Fully
    Bike to Work,
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  9. #9
    Wierdo
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    I carry two tubes because I have double-flatted in the past.

    Swap out tubes in the field. Patch tubes at home. After three patches I toss the tube.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    MTB I always patched with self adhesive patches when I ran tubes. They held fine.

    On the commuter road bike, it seems the self adhesive patches don't hold so well at 100psi. I just replace tube and move on. I do keep a patch kit in my bag in case I have more than 1 flat.

  11. #11
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    patching???
    when my tubes get holes in them, I just sell 'em on MTBR classifieds
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  12. #12
    Birthday Collector
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    I've been running tubeless the last 5 years or so - but carry a spare tube in case I have a bad enough cut that won't seal with the Stan's alone. I have boot material, tube, Park (or equiv) peel-'n-stick patches, which will usually let me finish the ride if I have to patch something, also they work well for smaller tire cuts as a mini-boot if the tire won't seal. For road, I use the peel-'n-stick on the ride, if I get a 2nd flat, then re-do it at home with a good Rema-style patch kit. I go forever (almost) with no flats, and then get like three in one day - happens every few years.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
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  13. #13
    Moderator Moderator
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    For presta wheels, I like to carry one of those little thread-on schrader converters, just in case my pump dies or something...I figure it is a lot easier to find a regular pump, whether at a gas station, nearby home, or from another biker.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
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    That's an awesome idea! I need to get a couple of those to toss in my camelback and my seat bag.

  15. #15
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I keep a scrader converter in my backpack also. You never know.

    Folks who are saying that glueless patches don't work have never used Lezyne brand glueless patches. I have tried a few brands, and these things are hands down the best quality glueless (or glued) patches out there.

    My policy is to throw in a spare in the field and patch the tube at home or at work...but in reality, I usually get a slow leaker that I can ride the rest of the way to wherever I'm going (as long as you don't pull the thorn out until you get there), and I wind up just pulling that tube, patching it, and throwing it back in without messing up the neatly rolled-up spare in my bag.

    If I do throw in a spare, when I patch the flatted tube it then becomes my new spare. The problem with rotating them out like this is that you are inflating/deflating the same tubes with patches on them several times. A traditional glue-on patch is great for this, and doesn't weaken with repeated inflation/deflation. Most brands of glueless patches weaken when the tube is deflated and then reinflated. I have had several brands of glueless patches fail due to this: Slime Skabs and Bell brands come to mind. Lezyne glueless patches do not suffer from this same weakness, and hold up at least as well as a glue-on patch after repeated inflation/deflation becuase they stretch with the rubber...they are THE way to go. I am done with glue-on patches. Peel and stick. Bada-bing. No other brand holds a candle. I have had commuter tubes with 4 or 5 Lezyne glueless patches on them in my pack as a spare, and I have never worried for a second about one of them failing. Currently I think both tubes in my commuter bike have 3 Lezyne patches on them, and my spare has one.

    BUT, all that being said, I just converted my first set of rims to tubeless a couple weeks ago, and I pulled my first goathead out of a tubeless tire the other day..."psshht", sealed. Thinking hard about converting the commuter.
    Last edited by CommuterBoy; 03-25-2010 at 01:12 PM.
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    (no excuse for that either)

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by EBrider
    Usually don't patch, unless I have a rash of flats. Problem I have had is that once the tube of glue is open, it dries out and I would rather my emergency patch kit not have an open tube in case it won't work in an emergency. I rarely get flats, so I would probably end up buying enough patch kits to offset savings from not buying tubes.
    I agree that once you open a tube of glue for one patch, it's pretty much wasted.

    When I get a flat on the trail/road, I just put in a new tube. When I get home I throw the old one in a 5-gallon bucket.When it gets full (every two years or so) I sit down and patch them all at once.

  17. #17
    weirdo
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    Wow, I forgot about all the people who ride tubeless these days. It still looks like more tubies than not, though I`m pretty sure that`ll change within a few more years. In cold climates, doesn`t the sealer lump up at the bottom of the tube and go "whop-whop-whop" when you start riding? I had that problem the only time I tried using slimed tubes, but maybe that problem has been addressed.

    Presta adaptor- thanks for reminding me. I`ve always used shraeders and just drill out the few rims that come with mini holes, but I think I`ll keep my road bike with prestas (the only 700 tubes I stock anyway) and I probably ought to get a few of those adaptors stashed away here and there.

    I really want to try that super glue and no patch trick. Never heard that one before, but it sounds good. The only problem is that super glue dries out a lot faaster for me than the rubber cement in patch kits. Super glue really is a one time affair for me, while the rubber cement is usually good for at least six months. Wish all that stuff came in single serving packages.
    Recalculating....

  18. #18
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    In cold climates, doesn`t the sealer lump up at the bottom of the tube and go "whop-whop-whop" when you start riding? I had that problem the only time I tried using slimed tubes, but maybe that problem has been addressed.
    I'm in your climate, and I've been a holdout largely because of my experience with gelled-up glumpy slime making my bike feel like a clown bike at 6:30 in the morning in single digits... That problem has been addressed on several levels... first, even the slime products are thinner now, and contain ethylene glycol (antifreeze)...the old stuff was thicker and DEFINITELY had a problem with getting all gelly (jelly?) at colder temps. I went with homebrew stuff (search for the 'best tubeless brew?' thread in the 29er forum and read 5 pages of mad science)....everyone is trying to make stuff that works like Stan's but lasts longer...and they pretty much have. My experience is really good so far... lowest temp I've ridden 'em in is 25* F with no clown bike issues at all.

    If I go pick up the front end of the bike and spin the wheel right now, it will feel like there's a small weight in the wheel...lock up the brake and then spin the wheel again, and it's completely balanced...takes all of 30 feet of riding for it to settle out inside the wheel...consistency is thinner than egg nog,and there's antifreeze in it... I don't see winter being a problem at this point. Time will tell.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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