waterPROOF tights?

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  • 10-11-2018
    Lenny7
    waterPROOF tights?
    No padding and not bibs. I want to be able to take them off easily. I can't seem to find anything. I see a lot of water resistant . Is that as good as it gets? I might be moving to a very wet climate and want to be ready to commute.
  • 10-11-2018
    bedwards1000
    I don't think I have ever seen tights. Since waterproof usually means totally un-breathable the sweat would probably drain into your shoes. Showers pass makes some pretty good waterproof stuff. I have the Storm Pant. The Refuge looks darn nice but $$$
    https://www.showerspass.com/collecti...8aAm0pEALw_wcB
  • 10-11-2018
    Taroroot
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    No padding and not bibs. I want to be able to take them off easily. I can't seem to find anything. I see a lot of water resistant . Is that as good as it gets? I might be moving to a very wet climate and want to be ready to commute.

    Riding generates so much sweat that i think people are resgined to getting wet. For water proof, usually you wear a tech shell over a base layer. But there isnt a material made that can “breath” enough to allow the amount of sweat you generate to all evaporate. Itll need vent openings to assist. Main thing is to stay warm.
  • 10-11-2018
    woodway
    I live in a very wet climate (the Pacific Northwest of the US). Think about a good rain jacket and wool base layers to keep your core warm, good gloves to keep your hands warm and good socks/shoe covers to keep your feet warm. I wear Pearl Izumi tights and let my legs get wet. I love Showers Pass products. Expensive but they perform and last a long time.
  • 10-15-2018
    Sage of the Sage
    Get a set of windproof tights and treat them with scotchguard.

    Me personally? I keep my upper body dry and deal with damp legs/feet. A good set of fenders helps with this...
  • 10-15-2018
    JBarn
    Pearl Izumi - Amfibs do a GREAT job. Do not wear above 50 or you will burn up. The newer ones have flaps that go down over your booties. Great product!
  • 10-15-2018
    carlhulit
    Anyone here tried rain legs? I am looking at buying a set for this winter, they are basically waterproof chaps that cover the front of your legs and strap on. Seem like a good option to have and they are pretty cheap.
  • 10-15-2018
    rockcrusher
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    I live in a very wet climate (the Pacific Northwest of the US). Think about a good rain jacket and wool base layers to keep your core warm, good gloves to keep your hands warm and good socks/shoe covers to keep your feet warm. I wear Pearl Izumi tights and let my legs get wet. I love Showers Pass products. Expensive but they perform and last a long time.

    I do the same. I toyed with waterproof pants but I was already getting so dehydrated just with a rain jacket I have just stuck with a nice set of tights. They get wet but the rain is usually the mist type of rain most of the time.

    I do think a great pair of fenders and then some long flats to keep your feet and legs dry is better than tights. Sometimes you just have to get used to being wet, as it is when I get in after a ride water runs off and from within my rain jacket. Rain and sweat/condensations from exercise. This year I am trying just a waterproof vest with a wool blend long sleeve undershirt. At least until it get freezing and raining.
  • 10-17-2018
    Megashnauzer
    i made myself a pair of rain pants that fit pretty snug over levi's. i've got a 38" inseam so nothing off the rack would work. they do get hot, even on short rides i roast.
  • 10-17-2018
    Harold
    WaterPROOF means hardshell. And it means TONS of sweating.

    I've got some super nice Bontrager tights that are extremely water resistant/wind blocking front, but simple fleecy rear. Helps to cut down on the drawbacks of using such water resistant materials on the front panels to keep you dry-ish. I also have some Bontrager WxB booties that go inside the shoes. Paired with a nice wool sock against the skin, they're WAY better/more versatile than shoe covers or heavy winter shoes.
  • 10-18-2018
    Lenny7
    Thanks for all the input. If I'm looking at pants, does Gore tex breath as well as they say or will they still be a sauna when riding hard? It's looking pretty likely that my wife and I will be moving to London. Not 100% yet. Water resistant would probably work most days from what I understand and have experienced there. I live in Texas so my wardrobe is gonna have to turnover.
  • 10-20-2018
    Harold
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    Thanks for all the input. If I'm looking at pants, does Gore tex breath as well as they say or will they still be a sauna when riding hard? It's looking pretty likely that my wife and I will be moving to London. Not 100% yet. Water resistant would probably work most days from what I understand and have experienced there. I live in Texas so my wardrobe is gonna have to turnover.

    Any hardshell laminate including Gore-tex, eVent, and others, will become a sweaty sauna during high intensity activity (biking). Breathability is a scale - it's not all-or-nothing. WaterPROOF garments are low on that scale, water resistant/wind blocking garments are middle-of-the-road, and so on.

    I just bought a 4-way stretchy wind jacket made by Specialized yesterday because I needed a light wind jacket that would be okay in cool temps (above freezing) and damp conditions (like today, surprise!). I have no expectations of it being waterproof, but I probably won't be out riding if I need truly waterproof stuff for the whole ride. Getting caught in a downpour, sure, but I've already got hardshell emergency stuff like that I can pack along.

    For commuting, you might want to look into a "rain cape". That's a bike-specific garment that's waterproof yet doesn't build up clammy sweat because the form of it allows for airflow underneath, even though the fabric would sweat out.