• 04-26-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    3 Attachment(s)
    On using the largest visible part of a cyclist to improve safety - my project
    Hi,
    As a cyclists commuter (I do about 4000 miles a year), I was a bit worried about cycling at night. Which is when I realized that utilizing the backpack, which is the most visible part of a commuter cyclist, to improve safety is such a natural idea! Over 6 moths, I started building this backpack and several prototypes later, I think we got it right! Presenting to you - Aster, the safest commute backpack in the world! Do check it out at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/1656733 .


    Attachment 1066223

    I took inspiration from cars and motorcycles and built in a turn indicator, automatic brake lights, rear lights visible from 250M/800ft, static profile lights and door-me-not front lights. The indicators are controlled by a handlebar unit via Bluetooth and the backpack can be configured through an app.

    Attachment 1066224


    Of course, as a cyclist, it gave me an opportunity to rethink the backpack from a cyclist point of view too! For example, an "Emergency contact info" slot is just basic and should have been there in every cycling backpack! Also, I decided to put in reflectors that were visible from multiple angles!

    Attachment 1066225

    I finally launched the backpack on Indiegogo. I would love to hear feedback from the community. This is still a work in progress, of course, so would love to hear any ideas on how else we can improve safety through this!


    Thanks
    Gandharv
  • 04-26-2016
    bedwards1000
    Well, I don't usually ride with a pack but this one seems very well thought out. Very nice job. If it doesn't already have one, I'd include a loop to attach an external tail light.

    Most of these crowd sourced bike accessories are pretty stupid but this one looks good. Good luck!
  • 04-26-2016
    Harold
    I also do not commute with a backpack, but this one is pretty cool.

    One thing I saw on a scooter rider recently that would be a VERY cool add -

    This scooter had some kind of wireless setup that tied in with the rider's helmet. There was a super wide bar of red LED's on the back of the motorcycle helmet. They had a regular "taillight" mode, and then brightened along with the rest of the brake lights on the scooter.

    I have a friend with a dynamo hub on his bike and a taillight that brightens like a brake light when the voltage from the hub drops (like when he's slowing or stopping). Tying systems like this together for a bicyle would be a wicked cool project.
  • 04-26-2016
    TenSpeed
    I already run a bright front and bright rear light at night and wear clothing with reflective front and rear bits. I do use a messenger bag to commute, but I would not use this. It is time to focus on the drivers responsibility, not the cyclists.
  • 04-26-2016
    CommuterBoy
    I'm a backpack guy, and this looks cool... but I'm curious about what materials and construction are used in the actual pack? I've become a bit of a backpack snob with the Cordura fabric, waterproof zippers, and features of a high-end pack. I'd consider this backpack if it matched the quality of Timbuk2, Chrome, Osprey, etc.
  • 04-26-2016
    Kleebs
    There are some cool features here, but any bike accessory with turn indicators is a no go for me.
  • 04-26-2016
    gregg
    Hello Gandharv,

    Interesting product. We will give you this one thread to talk about your new product, but please do not post multiple times or in multiple forums.

    Thanks,

    -Gregg, MTBR.com Site Manager
  • 04-26-2016
    BrianMc
    Interesting.

    I think I have the day and night visibility covered.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHoDeUtYceg

    If that is not enough, then it is the motorist's fault.

    I use high vis gloves that are picked out by headlights so the signal thing works. The SOL 48 has a bluetooth signal feature that is useless and the sending unit came apart.

    BrianMc
  • 04-26-2016
    cyclingdutchman
    I would like to know how it is powered? Batterypack, rechargeable batteries or a (hint hint) built in solarpanel on the top?

    The lights definitely bring an advantage, but I would not want to rely on them only. I think you should have lights attached to the bike as well as reflectors on the pedals or reflective stripes on the shoes. This rotating movement will mostly identify you as a cyclist rather than a motorcycle or similar. After all, the signaling is more like a motorist than a bike.

    If it holds up to the expectations this is going to be a very good product. Make sure everything is durable!

    I wish you good luck and may the crowd be with you.
  • 04-26-2016
    TenSpeed
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    Interesting.

    I think I have the day and night visibility covered.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHoDeUtYceg

    If that is not enough, then it is the motorist's fault.

    I use high vis gloves that are picked out by headlights so the signal thing works. The SOL 48 has a bluetooth signal feature that is useless and the sending unit came apart.

    BrianMc

    If you are safely and properly riding in the road with lights and reflective stuff on, and you get hit, it is always the motorists fault.
  • 04-26-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Thanks! This is always a work in progress, so feedback helps. Would a look be useful even if the backpack has inbuilt lights? Just checking - loop is the easiest thing to build in, of course.!
  • 04-26-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Hi Harold,
    That is true. The most effective way to detect braking is to simply attach a sensor to the brake wire or to the braking lever itself. It is an awesome DIY project. In fact, if you want to work on that and need any help, do tell me(no money involved)!

    The lights brightening is absolutely required for braking system - am incorporating that in Aster :) !
    Thanks
    Gandharv
  • 04-26-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    I already run a bright front and bright rear light at night and wear clothing with reflective front and rear bits. I do use a messenger bag to commute, but I would not use this. It is time to focus on the drivers responsibility, not the cyclists.

    Hi TenSpeed,
    Safety is always a matter of us being visible, motorists being aware and empathetic and infrastructure (like lanes etc). So, you are right. But the easier thing is for us to take steps - the other two are harder and require a more long-term effort. We still need to put in that effort of course.

    I wouldn't get into an argument on this since we could just have different views on this and co-exist :)
    Gandharv
  • 04-26-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gregg View Post
    Hello Gandharv,

    Interesting product. We will give you this one thread to talk about your new product, but please do not post multiple times or in multiple forums.

    Thanks,

    -Gregg, MTBR.com Site Manager

    Thanks Gregg,
    appreciate that. Wouldn't post about this on any other thread and will take care.

    Gandharv
  • 04-27-2016
    c8stom
    In a very old project I did ( pre 1990 ), I created indicator lights which attached to the bike via the old cantilever stubs, at each side of the rear and front skewer similar to telescopic BMX pegs and also at the ends of the handlebar. The width was customisable and control was by wire. As the lights were always on the bike, it was no fuss setup. frame Wiring was done using very thin low profile electronically conductive tape which you'd stick once and never touch again. The tape itself was clear but you'd see two thin copper conductors in the tape. The batteries were held in a easy to access rattle-free case inside the handlebar. It worked well but remained a prototype.

    A BT version would be cool if the power consumption is low. How long does your setup last on a single charge ?

    Personally, I don't use backpacks and I would not start using them for a lighting feature but thats not to say others wouldn't

    How have roadies responded to your product ? The roadies I know do not use back packs certainly not on recreational rides. Some do use camelbaks but the majority use bottles. In my view, they make up the majority of your prospective business as road users.

    Goodluck with it.
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    2 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I'm a backpack guy, and this looks cool... but I'm curious about what materials and construction are used in the actual pack? I've become a bit of a backpack snob with the Cordura fabric, waterproof zippers, and features of a high-end pack. I'd consider this backpack if it matched the quality of Timbuk2, Chrome, Osprey, etc.

    Hi CommuterBoy,
    That's awesome.
    The fabric we use in the Aster is a 600D polyester with clear matte Polyurethane coating on its outer surface. This will give the surface a mild gloss, and cause water droplets to bead up and roll off. The shaded 2-colour effect is achieved with a sublimation print. The bag fabric and finish will be similar to this Nike backpack.

    Attachment 1066467

    Zippers tend to be the vulnerable point in a bag. Aster has one S-shaped water-resistant zipper that opens the main compartment. What makes it water-resistant? The zipper-tape (fabric bits on either side of the zipper) are coated with a PU finish, and the zipper teeth are hidden on the underside of the zipper, giving you a relatively impenetrable zipper which looks like this.

    Attachment 1066468

    All other compartments use YKK zippers. I dont know if that helps! Apologies for the slightly longish answer.

    Gandharv
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    There are some cool features here, but any bike accessory with turn indicators is a no go for me.

    Thanks Kleebs! Just curious - why do you not like indicators? Is it cause it takes away from the riding experience?
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    2 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cyclingdutchman View Post
    I would like to know how it is powered? Batterypack, rechargeable batteries or a (hint hint) built in solarpanel on the top?

    The lights definitely bring an advantage, but I would not want to rely on them only. I think you should have lights attached to the bike as well as reflectors on the pedals or reflective stripes on the shoes. This rotating movement will mostly identify you as a cyclist rather than a motorcycle or similar. After all, the signaling is more like a motorist than a bike.

    If it holds up to the expectations this is going to be a very good product. Make sure everything is durable!

    I wish you good luck and may the crowd be with you.

    Hi Cycledutchman,,
    It has a 4,000 mAh Lithium-ion battery inside it. Funnily, a previous backpack we make (and is commercial now) is a Solar hydration backpack. It is below:

    Attachment 1066471

    For weekend rides, Solar helps and the cost is worth it. But Solar is a bit of a cost overkill for commutes especially since we end up having a charging options at office and at home.

    You are right - you shouldn't only rely on just the backpack. Moving reflectors (like on Pedals) add significantly to your visibility and the backpack wouldn't substitute that.

    True, we are testing on the durability. We have a few mountain bikers in our team, who do a good job of falling with the prototype :) . That helps us. Thanks again for your wishes!

    Gandharv
  • 04-27-2016
    TenSpeed
    What will the price be on this bag? I am curious to see where that will fall in the market.
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by c8stom View Post
    In a very old project I did ( pre 1990 ), I created indicator lights which attached to the bike via the old cantilever stubs, at each side of the rear and front skewer similar to telescopic BMX pegs and also at the ends of the handlebar. The width was customisable and control was by wire. As the lights were always on the bike, it was no fuss setup. frame Wiring was done using very thin low profile electronically conductive tape which you'd stick once and never touch again. The tape itself was clear but you'd see two thin copper conductors in the tape. The batteries were held in a easy to access rattle-free case inside the handlebar. It worked well but remained a prototype.

    A BT version would be cool if the power consumption is low. How long does your setup last on a single charge ?

    Personally, I don't use backpacks and I would not start using them for a lighting feature but thats not to say others wouldn't

    How have roadies responded to your product ? The roadies I know do not use back packs certainly not on recreational rides. Some do use camelbaks but the majority use bottles. In my view, they make up the majority of your prospective business as road users.

    Goodluck with it.

    Hi C8stom,
    That is cool. Actually, the DIY version of just indicators should be fairly simple. It is amazing that you did it back then!

    With the release of BLE (Blue-tooth low energy), it has become quite power efficient. Our indicator unit has just the indicator controls, accelerometer (for brake detection) and anti-theft detection. So, there is not a lot of power it consumes - we expect it to last for 6 months on a coin-cell.

    There are those who ride roadies for their commutes with backpack - some of them have bought. Even the angle of lights are adjustable to suit that position. I dont think this would be appropriate for recreational rides - laptop backpacks tend to be heavy for just carrying hydration. Bottle cages and Jerseys with pockets usually good enough storage for leisure rides!

    The intention of working on Aster was primarily for commutes - though that might be a smaller market. Me and my team are working on incorporating this in Jerseys too, but incorporating Electronics in that is a different challenge all together. Lets see how that comes along!

    Thanks!
    Gandharv
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    What will the price be on this bag? I am curious to see where that will fall in the market.

    Hi TenSpeed,
    For the crowdfunding project, we are pricing it at USD 99. For retail, we are planning to keep it at USD 149. Any advise on that?

    Thanks
    Gandharv
  • 04-27-2016
    CommuterBoy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GandharvSpecialized View Post
    Hi CommuterBoy,

    I dont know if that helps! Apologies for the slightly longish answer.

    Gandharv

    Totally helps, thanks. Those waterproof YKK zips are what are all over my Timbuk2... they work good, except when they get in a spot where the bag flexes and creates a pool on the zipper when it's really raining hard. Then they seep a bit. Usually just the inner bag liner will get a bit wet about an inch down from the zipper in that spot, but if your work shirt happens to be pressed up against that spot, you get a wet spot on your shirt. A flap-top bag is the only way around this I think. Those zippers are like 93% effective.

    In my head I have designed a little mini-flap thing all along the zipper, that closes like a zip-lock baggie with a rubber channel. In my head it works perfectly :lol:
  • 04-27-2016
    cyclingdutchman
    I have to admit that I really like the thing. Actually I avoid backpacks when I can but somehow I would at least want to try this pack. Is it going to be for sale in europe as well? And one other question: how is the back designed concerning ventilation etc?Good luck again.
  • 04-27-2016
    bedwards1000
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GandharvSpecialized View Post
    Thanks! This is always a work in progress, so feedback helps. Would a look be useful even if the backpack has inbuilt lights? Just checking - loop is the easiest thing to build in, of course.!

    The built in lights aren't as bright as some lighting specific tail lights. Also, if the built in lights fail it would give an option of a backup. I always run 2 rear facing lights so if one fails when I'm on a dark road I have redundancy since it isn't possible to see if one fails.

    ...or if you forgot your smart phone and couldn't' turn it on.
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Totally helps, thanks. Those waterproof YKK zips are what are all over my Timbuk2... they work good, except when they get in a spot where the bag flexes and creates a pool on the zipper when it's really raining hard. Then they seep a bit. Usually just the inner bag liner will get a bit wet about an inch down from the zipper in that spot, but if your work shirt happens to be pressed up against that spot, you get a wet spot on your shirt. A flap-top bag is the only way around this I think. Those zippers are like 93% effective.

    In my head I have designed a little mini-flap thing all along the zipper, that closes like a zip-lock baggie with a rubber channel. In my head it works perfectly :lol:

    Hi CommuterBoy,
    Thanks. I think a mini-flap is a good idea. Just out of curiosity - what are your thoughts on a transparent rain cover (transparent to make sure the lights, indicators are visible out of it)?

    Thanks!
    Gandharv
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    1 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cyclingdutchman View Post
    I have to admit that I really like the thing. Actually I avoid backpacks when I can but somehow I would at least want to try this pack. Is it going to be for sale in europe as well? And one other question: how is the back designed concerning ventilation etc?Good luck again.

    Hi Cyclingdutchman,
    Thanks :) . It is - through Indiegogo, almost 22% of our contributions come from Europe. I am just attaching a photo of the back ventilation:

    Attachment 1066730

    Honestly, and this I borrow from my knowledge of hydration backpacks, the best ventilation is provided by mesh support in hydration backpacks. I am trying something like that but am not sure that works for laptop backpacks as well. The airflow facilitated by a broken back padding seems to be the best option around. Do tell me if you think you've seen something better in your experience.

    Thanks!
    Gandharv
  • 04-27-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    The built in lights aren't as bright as some lighting specific tail lights. Also, if the built in lights fail it would give an option of a backup. I always run 2 rear facing lights so if one fails when I'm on a dark road I have redundancy since it isn't possible to see if one fails.

    ...or if you forgot your smart phone and couldn't' turn it on.

    Hi,
    I agree with you. Just to clarify, you dont need the Smart phone to turn the backpack lights - there is a switch on the handlebar unit and within the backpack for that. But yeah, always makes sense to have redundancy! We have a hoops for the U-lock anyways.

    Thanks!
    Gandharv
  • 04-28-2016
    Kleebs
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GandharvSpecialized View Post
    Thanks Kleebs! Just curious - why do you not like indicators? Is it cause it takes away from the riding experience?

    Gandharv - Thanks for taking the time to respond to everyone here. It is really helpful.

    I don't like indicators because I think it is creating a solution to a problem that doesn't exist, and it deflects responsibility from motorists in the case of a collision.

    How often do cyclists get hit by a car because they were preparing to turn, and the car didn't know their intentions? In my experience, hand signals are more visible because of the larger movement and when motorists hit cyclists from the rear it is most often because they weren't paying attention or were ass deep in their phones.

    In the case of a collision, I fear (perhaps irrationally) that indicators will eventually have a similar effect as helmets. You can't read a story about a collision between a car and a bike without finding out if the cyclist was wearing a helmet. It has become a means of deflecting blame to the cyclist, even though a helmet would not have been necessary if the motorist didn't hit them in the first place. I don't want to start hearing about how a cyclist was hit because they didn't have indicators, when indicators don't address the true problem, which is distracted driving.

    I'm also predisposed to dislike any unnecessary accessory on my handle bars. Between lights and a computer, there is barely enough room up there as it is.
  • 04-28-2016
    TenSpeed
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    Gandharv - Thanks for taking the time to respond to everyone here. It is really helpful.

    I don't like indicators because I think it is creating a solution to a problem that doesn't exist, and it deflects responsibility from motorists in the case of a collision.

    How often do cyclists get hit by a car because they were preparing to turn, and the car didn't know their intentions? In my experience, hand signals are more visible because of the larger movement and when motorists hit cyclists from the rear it is most often because they weren't paying attention or were ass deep in their phones.

    In the case of a collision, I fear (perhaps irrationally) that indicators will eventually have a similar effect as helmets. You can't read a story about a collision between a car and a bike without finding out if the cyclist was wearing a helmet. It has become a means of deflecting blame to the cyclist, even though a helmet would not have been necessary if the motorist didn't hit them in the first place. I don't want to start hearing about how a cyclist was hit because they didn't have indicators, when indicators don't address the true problem, which is distracted driving.

    I'm also predisposed to dislike any unnecessary accessory on my handle bars. Between lights and a computer, there is barely enough room up there as it is.

    You said everything I was thinking, but you were far nicer about it. I completely agree about the whole deflecting to the cyclist and the helmet. Cyclist hit by car, and the first thing mentioned is if the cyclist had a helmet on. I hate reading that.
  • 04-28-2016
    rogbie
    There's three reasons I haven't switched to a backpack style bag over my messenger bag: 1) The bag's still fully functional, no need to replace it; 2) During hard acceleration I've found backpacks with and without waist straps tend to exacerbate side-to-side motion: a higher center of gravity; 3) The most concerning is, a lack of over-the-shoulder visibility. A necessary for safe lane changes.

    This is a product I'm sure will fit some's needs.
  • 04-28-2016
    TenSpeed
    Since I use mine as a messenger bag when I deliver, I have grown accustomed to having it on my back and it feels weird when it is not there. Between comfort level and ease of access off the bike, they are hard to beat. And with a stability strap they hardly move when you are all over the pedals getting some!! I have a rolltop backpack that I sometimes use and it feels very foreign when I have it on vs that messenger bag. So my back sweats when I have it on, yeah, it matches the rest of me then. :)
  • 04-28-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    Gandharv - Thanks for taking the time to respond to everyone here. It is really helpful.

    I don't like indicators because I think it is creating a solution to a problem that doesn't exist, and it deflects responsibility from motorists in the case of a collision.

    How often do cyclists get hit by a car because they were preparing to turn, and the car didn't know their intentions? In my experience, hand signals are more visible because of the larger movement and when motorists hit cyclists from the rear it is most often because they weren't paying attention or were ass deep in their phones.

    In the case of a collision, I fear (perhaps irrationally) that indicators will eventually have a similar effect as helmets. You can't read a story about a collision between a car and a bike without finding out if the cyclist was wearing a helmet. It has become a means of deflecting blame to the cyclist, even though a helmet would not have been necessary if the motorist didn't hit them in the first place. I don't want to start hearing about how a cyclist was hit because they didn't have indicators, when indicators don't address the true problem, which is distracted driving.

    I'm also predisposed to dislike any unnecessary accessory on my handle bars. Between lights and a computer, there is barely enough room up there as it is.

    Thanks Kleebs,
    That is some detailed feedback. Thanks! You are right about the Victim-blaming tendency - it is quite irritating and probably the easy "solution" when accidents happen. Honestly, nothing (no helmets, rear lights) is going to save you if someone driving at 70 mph or above is looking at their phones and runs into you.

    Of course, we still need to take whatever precautions we can. These are personal choices though. BTW, distracted drivers especially on faster roads, can be fatal but are probably not the source of most accidents. An interesting read is this article on accidents in North Carolina - The Case for Requiring Rear Lighting at Night . The percentage of accidents occurring while cars are overtaking bikes, is 2x higher at night. This is true across locations like Los Angeles, Portland etc. There genuinely seems to be a visibility issue. A slightly geeky read might be this paper from University of Adelaide (Australia) on commuter clothing in the day time - http://acrs.org.au/files/arsrpe/Raft...onspicuity.pdf .

    Of course, the only true long term solution is to get a larger percentage of people to cycle through a mixture of infrastructure, social incentives etc. But I'm not sure how old I'll be by then :) .

    Gandharv
  • 04-28-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rogbie View Post
    There's three reasons I haven't switched to a backpack style bag over my messenger bag: 1) The bag's still fully functional, no need to replace it; 2) During hard acceleration I've found backpacks with and without waist straps tend to exacerbate side-to-side motion: a higher center of gravity; 3) The most concerning is, a lack of over-the-shoulder visibility. A necessary for safe lane changes.

    This is a product I'm sure will fit some's needs.

    Thanks rogbie. Those are fair points. hopefully the straps help but I think there are just 3 camps in the commute cycling world - those who use Panniers, those who use messenger bags, and the backpack variety. I find Panniers very practical but just can't switch to them. It's just difficult to switch once you're used to carrying the same kind of bag for so long!
  • 04-28-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Since I use mine as a messenger bag when I deliver, I have grown accustomed to having it on my back and it feels weird when it is not there. Between comfort level and ease of access off the bike, they are hard to beat. And with a stability strap they hardly move when you are all over the pedals getting some!! I have a rolltop backpack that I sometimes use and it feels very foreign when I have it on vs that messenger bag. So my back sweats when I have it on, yeah, it matches the rest of me then. :)

    Yes Tenspeed! Like I had mentioned in my above comment, I totally get that. For me, I need to feel the straps of the backpacks around me closely. I even prefer my hydration pack for my commutes. Tried Panniers ones, but just ended up feeling semi-dressed.

    Gandharv
  • 05-08-2016
    bmf032
    I'm a little surprised with the color. For me if I'm buying a bag or clothing specifically for the bike then hi visible yellow is the only option. For day time visibility it's such an easy and effective option that anything else just doesn't make sense to me.
  • 05-09-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bmf032 View Post
    I'm a little surprised with the color. For me if I'm buying a bag or clothing specifically for the bike then hi visible yellow is the only option. For day time visibility it's such an easy and effective option that anything else just doesn't make sense to me.

    Hi bmf032,
    Thanks for your feedback. Actually, that was a big debate for us too. Color is the simplest option to provide - however, when we tested it with commuters (specifically in SF and Seattle), the feedback we got tended towards backpacks that fit in at the office and weren't too bright. We put a custom color option too (at a higher price) but most people ended up preferring Black backpacks for commute. Maybe it was very specific to the people we picked - would you carry a laptop backpack at high-viz color (like Fluorescent Green or Orange)?

    Thanks!
    Gandharv
  • 05-09-2016
    bmf032
    I see your point. I didn't think of that because it's not an issue for me. I wonder if a high viz rain cover would be popular? Anyway, to answer your question, yes.:lol my helmet is neon green and my bike is orange. I didn't claim to be hip.
  • 05-09-2016
    GandharvSpecialized
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bmf032 View Post
    I see your point. I didn't think of that because it's not an issue for me. I wonder if a high viz rain cover would be popular? Anyway, to answer your question, yes.:lol my helmet is neon green and my bike is orange. I didn't claim to be hip.

    True. But it does make sense and I have heard that as feedback a few more times. I am working on a high-viz color, just as an option anyways :)

    As for being hip, my idea of a fashion sense sometimes involves landing up at work with a nice splash-back caused polka dotted Shirt and matted hair!
    Gandharv