Turning 93 Raleigh MT200 into commuter/touring bike- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Turning 93 Raleigh MT200 into commuter/touring bike

    Posted this in the frame building section as well. Thought I'd try here.

    I have a 93 Mt 200 that my Dad used to ride years ago. I am thinking of turning it into a drop bar commuter. 1x drive-train, drop bars, flats and semi-aggressive tires are all that I am sold on. The rest I'm up for opinions. Whats your thought. I'm up for changing everything except the frame obviously.

    If you know the bike, whats the widest tires I can run? Anything else model specific would be great.

    These are kind of what I'm after. Thanks in advance.




    This is not mine but looks very similar. Minus the outrageous stem.


    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
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    I have a '93 or '94 (don't know which) MT-400, not a MT-200. Aside from color and size, my frame looks similar to the red MT-200 you posted. If you have any specific questions, I'll be glad to answer, if I can.

    Quote Originally Posted by CChambers
    If you know the bike, whats the widest tires I can run?
    26 x 2.3 knobbies fit just fine on mine. They are not too tight. Between the chainstays is the tightest clearance. The front fork clearance is huge.

    Tires pictured below are 26 x 1.75 Forte Gotham commuting tires from Performance Bicycle. This isn't the best picture I have if you need to see details, but is one that's still in my Photobucket album for immediate posting, so here ya go.



    I'm running a 3x8 drivetrain with Shimano bar-end shifters and On-One Midge bars. Let me know if you want more pictures and I'll be happy to oblige, including the bike with both racks on (loaded and empty), in the snow, caked with mud, near some great Colorado scenery, and everywhere else, wearing both knobbies and street tires.

    [Edited the next day to update the picture after having to re-do my Photobucket account, since they've apparently drastically cut the amount of storage one can have for free...can't say I blame them if they're trying to make a buck, but it was unexpected]
    Last edited by Squeeze; 09-09-2016 at 03:22 PM.

  3. #3
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    Hey, hey. A response. I appreciate it.

    Thanks for the info. I like the setup. Post all the pics you want. The more the merrier.

    I'm thinking 1x or 2x at the most. Definitely flats. I like the looks of the Maxxis holy roller tire

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    Be sure to check out this enormous thread at another forum about doing exactly what you're thinking of: Show Your Vintage MTB Drop Bar Conversions - Bike Forums

    Here are some pics of mine, unloaded and loaded in various configurations. I hope they are of some help and/or entertainment value.

    I don't know if the MT-200 and MT-400 frames are the same. Both models might have used the same frame but with different components, paint jobs, decals, etc., but they may be completely different.

    Here's a shot I didn't even know I had of the space between the chainstays. I would guess (but obviously don't know for sure) that 2.4" Holy Rollers would fit.

    This was before I bought a repair stand, so I had turned the saddle to rest on my workbench to keep the RD off the ground while I was changing tires, most likely. Cheesy, but effective!

    Since this picture was taken, I've changed the stem (and therefore handlebars, brake levers, and shifters - all not pictured), bottle cages, cantilever brake "arms" and pads, cables and housing, saddle, pedals, and ditched the el-cheapo adjustable kickstand. I also bought a proper repair stand to make stuff like this easier and a lot more fun.



    By the way, if your frame is the same as mine, there are threaded holes for fender mounting on the chainstay bridge, under that funky rear "fork" where the seatstays become one, and under the the front fork, too.

    Stripped down for summer riding:



    At Home Depot, with front rack only, buying a new one of life's necessities.



    Bringing home what looks like a pizza, but isn't.



    Winter commuting when the days are short, with and without camera flash. Trying to be artsy, I guess. *shrug*

















    With 26 x 2.1 Panaracer Fire Pro XC knobbies and matching shovel.



    Best of luck to you in making something cool out of your Dad's bike. Please let us know what you end up with!

  5. #5
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    Finally got the bike to the house and tried to get started on it. Got the bars off and had to runs some errands.

    Turning 93 Raleigh MT200 into commuter/touring bike-img_20170119_180024921.jpg

    I also picked up another bike. Little big for me but I couldn't pass up free.Older Gary Fisher in XL, I believe. I'll clean it up and sell it or maybe fix it up as well.

    Turning 93 Raleigh MT200 into commuter/touring bike-img_20170202_173802531.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Turning 93 Raleigh MT200 into commuter/touring bike-img_20170202_174252371.jpg  


  6. #6
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    Keep in mind cable adjusters if you use drop bar levers. You'll need to put them somewhere. Many ways to cross that bridge. I'm guessing 7 speed? For a commuter I see no reason not to run that with either some 3X7 brake/shift levers or maybe bar ends? I think all front/left side bar ends are friction, which means you can run what you have and later pervert to a 2X7 if you wish. I recommend a rear rack. A real one, not a quickie seat post type. Frame mount so you can bring home a bag of dog food and an 18 pack.

  7. #7
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    Made some headway recently. I decide to do this build as cheap as possible. I currently have $72 in it.

    Salsa Poco bars.
    Ritchey Stem
    Stole a seat an the rear rack off a Gary Fisher.
    Got some work to do, but making headway.

    Turning 93 Raleigh MT200 into commuter/touring bike-img_20170617_125705227.jpg

  8. #8
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    I realize the bars and the rack aren't right. Just threw them on for the picture.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CChambers View Post
    I realize the bars and the rack aren't right. Just threw them on for the picture.
    there is no right or wrong for a commuter. If you like those bars, use those bars. Ain't gonna hurt my feelin's. The major goal is quickly being accomplished; a good commuter without a buncha bucks being spent. Less chance of it becoming a target for thieves.
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

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