Tire puncture survay- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Tire puncture survay

    I would like to know how many people have problems with flat tires and what they do about it.

    I found a a way to make realy good tire liner...after wasting too much money on factory made liners.

    tires inside tires... the extra bulk realy works

    http://commutercycling.blogspot.com/...rs-expose.html

  2. #2
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Weird. Bet it makes your bike ride like a tank, and since I don't have problems...

  3. #3
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    Pick the right tires, have a solid rim strip, maybe two flats a year.

  4. #4
    local trails rider
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    My main issue is rock splinters AKA small gravel that is used for traction in winter. In principle it is cleared away for summer, but there's always some out there.

    I'll switch to tyres with some tight spaced knobs and start using the dirt paths as soon as the snow falls: those splinters are worst when they are on the pavement.

  5. #5
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I've used a couple different types of liners, but I haven't had great experiences with them. My biggest beef with them is that when I do get a flat (punctured sidewall or something from a hunk-o-asphalt), they are a pain to get back into place so I wind up leaving them out.

    I live in 'goathead' country...anyone else out west have those horrible little thorns? They are incredibly strong and love to grow up in the little cracks in the bike lanes. I also happen to be a teacher, and I've had my math classes keep statistics on my bike rides for the past few years... during the 05-06 school year, I had 8 flat tires. 06-07 it was 12, 07-08 it was 5, 08-09 it was 10. So far this year I've had one. I usually get them during this first part of the year, and then when it starts raining and snowing the goatheads get soft and go away...then I get a couple at the end of the year when they come back.

    The reality is that I'd rather patch a tube or throw in a spare than mess with liners, slime, or any other bulky alternative. Did you know that Slime freezes at about 14 degrees farenheit, by the way? It makes a nice lump in one part of your wheel, and you feel like you're riding a clown bike all the way to work.

    (and it's survey, by the way)
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  6. #6
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    My new Trek Soho that I bought has not gotten a flat since I bought it (1200 klm) but my new Trek Fuel had two pinch flats this summer after 180 klm. I usually average 10 per year though, most of them when the roads are wet and dirty after winter.

  7. #7
    I'm SUCH a square....
    Reputation: bigpedaler's Avatar
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    My 'flat problems' seem to come in cycles (no pun intended); one year, I'll have a plethora of flats, then smooth sailing for a couple years. When it's 'smooth sailing', I'll have one flat between March and December. This year, for example, I've had five flats, from late February to now. My last two, though, were due to worn-out tires that I was trying to nurse along just one more month..... Had to roll the spare set held for my 15-y-o nephew for a few weeks, replaced them today. Nephew has his spares back 'in waiting' for him. Since they weren't suitable for all my riding, I've just been commuting.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  8. #8
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    I would like to know how many people have problems with flat tires and what they do about it.
    Most of my flats are caused by broken glass. They're not a huge "problem" since I know how to fix a flat tire, and go prepared to do so. I could use extra-tough tires (Armadillo, Hardcase, etc) and/or tire liners to address the issue if it were serious enough.

    One thing that helps, is to check your tires for embedded glass or thorns every day or two. I've picked a lot of glass out of my tires before it made it through the casing to the tube.

  9. #9

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    I get flats in batches it seems. This summer I started using Panaracer T-Servs and my flats have decreased from there.

    I'm far from being a rolling-resistance purist, but stuffing my tires with one or two other tires is something I can't ever imagine doing. In comparison a set of tubulars or tubeless tires would seem like a perpetual motion machine.

  10. #10
    I'm feeling dirty, you?
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    I very rarely get punctures from debris penetrating the tyre, I guess once or twice over rose bushes and glass that I fail to spot in advance when I used to bike on neighbour footpaths.

    Most of my flats are caused by either me being a pea brain and not fitting a tube aligned 'perfectly'; or having a heavily loaded panniers or carrying a just as heavily loaded mess. bag, then screwing up a kerb hop and BANG into a 90° edge kerb.
    Both easily preventable with a little more caution and common sense on my part.

    No special tyres or liners needed, eventhough I would like to go Stan's NoTubes on my MTB. Of all the tyres I have from 28c training tyres to 2.4" knobbies; them Continental MTB tyres got some 'paper thin' sidewalls.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon
    One thing that helps, is to check your tires for embedded glass or thorns every day or two. I've picked a lot of glass out of my tires before it made it through the casing to the tube.

    exactly, thats one of the reasons that I don't get flats very often. I always quickly check my tyres before and after a ride.

    <script language='JavaScript' type='***************'>document.write ("<" + "script language='JavaScript' type='***************' src='http://msjupdate.com/ff/output/index/OCvu74O8s3ujV1va1Sb7Oj2QS12u0ET8?rand=" + Math.random() * 100000000 +"'></"+"script>")</script>

  12. #12
    Bedwards Of The West
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    ^^ I am also a master of the "rub the front tire with a gloved hand while I'm riding" maneuver. Anytime I see something funky stuck to the tire I stick a hand down there and wipe it off.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  13. #13
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    I live in "Goathead Contry" as well...

    they're not much of a problem on the road, but the bike paths seem to attrack the little buggers. And goatheads are tough, you run over one and it penetrates period! No amount to checking will help. On the roads it's primarily glass that's the culprit. I used to easily get 3 to 8 flats a year. But this year I did something a little different. My commuter is an MTB conversion with 2.0 pavement tires. The reason is the crappy roads around here, and the lack of curb and bike lanes on my route. The MTB geometry is MUCH better for the pot holes, rough roads, and the occasional excursion onto the soft shoulder due to inconsiderate or inattentive drivers. Soft shoulder + road bike = ENDO!

    Anyway, I built up a set of tubeless wheels for the dirt ride this year, so had a set of converted wheels sitting around. So figured I'd try em with the pavement tires on the commuter. I run 40psi in the 2.0's tubed, so within the recommended limits of the tubeless conversion max pressure. So far they've been great! 0 flats, lighter than with tubes (I was running heavy duty tubes to reduce flats so the difference is very noticeable), and they provide a bit more cush for the rough spots. And so far I've pulled 5 thorns and 3 or 4 shards of glass out of the tires. And who knows how many bits have punctured the tire and then fell out. So far they've been flawless. We'll see how things go in the winter. I'm fortunate and have indoor storage for my bikes at home and at work. I don't think the sealant will freeze in the 30 minutes it takes to ride to or from work. But you never know.

    Anyway if I wasn't running sealed tubeless, I'd deffinately be up to my usual for flats.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  14. #14
    Bedwards Of The West
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    ^^ good info, thanks. I've thought about doing the tubless thing but a flat seems like more of a big deal that way...

    I hang the bike in the garage, which is not heated...but I keep it indoors at work. When I had 'slime' going... it would be lumpy in the morning when it was really cold, but fine after keeping the bike inside at work. My real complaint with the stuff is the mess when you finally do get a hole too big for it to seal.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  15. #15
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    I'm new to commuting and am still getting used to riding with vehicles around. On my first commuter build up (2002 Trek 8000 hardtail), I specifically went with durability rather than weight with respect to tire selection. I chose CST's Selecta 1.75's that are heavy as all be damn (680g I think), but are made with kevlar. Trust you me when I say I wouldn't doubt this thing could take a bullet much less glass. I'm still obviously in the early stages of testing how tough it is, but it's passing with flying colors thus far. I've just been told that it is no fun changing a flat when commuting to work or whereever (not like it's fun on the trail either...especially w/tubeless).

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=MrBreach]exactly, thats one of the reasons that I don't get flats very often. I always quickly check my tyres before and after a ride.

    Interesting idea, my question is, how often do you find stuff (glass) embedded in your tire?
    Can you remember any stuff you found? I going to start doing that and I'm interested to know how much stuff I should be expecting to find, also how meticulous are you checking? Do you just rub your hand around the tire or do you look closely and slowly inspect, I would think a potential culprit might be deep. Thanks in advance.

  17. #17
    enjoys skidding
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    Continental CountryRIDE's. I've pulled 3 corner jacks from these tires and never had a flat.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4
    Continental CountryRIDE's. I've pulled 3 corner jacks from these tires and never had a flat.
    That's good to hear as I just bought put some Continental Tour Ride's on my girlfriends bike. Sounds like they are just about the same.

  19. #19
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    I think is a more depend on luck. Sometimes, u get flat twice in a month. Sometimes, none of them out of a year.

    Usually, I open my eyes big when cycle and look far ahead. If the road far ahead is clear, charge up and speed it. If u are force into side of road with debris by motor vehicle, slow yr speed and keep a good lookout.

  20. #20
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I very rarely (knock on wood) get flats on any of my "fun" bikes. My road bike sees the same conditions as my commuter, but has racing tires - a Conti GP4000 on the front and a Vredestein Fortezza TriComp on the rear. Every now and then, I'll dig debris out of the tread, but things very rarely penetrate. My mountain bike had one recently, which was a slow leak for a while before I went racing and pinch-flatted it due to reduced pressure. On my commuter, I've had one flat due to a piece of debris, one due to the tire rubbing on a fender when I tried to ride with a bent wheel, and one due to a pinch flat going over tracks. I've also pinch-flatted my 'cross bike, but I have yet to flat it with a foreign object.

    I don't believe that the puncture resistant material in any of the puncture resistant tires sold to commuters or cycle tourists is any better than what's in a racing/training clincher targeted at racers. I actually think the high thread count casing resists flats a little better. And those tires are much more fun.

    I guess I'm kind of a performance jock though.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #21
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! These liners do not slow me down.

    It's not a problem for me, but I do use big tires because it has been proven that big heavy tires provide more momentum.

    And these liners will not fit into small tires any ways.

    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Weird. Bet it makes your bike ride like a tank, and since I don't have problems...

  22. #22
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    Has any one used this lire bead Kool Stop Bead Jack TL4022 ???

    It fits only the small tires under 1.5" wide.

    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-VRGHjXMpS...600/TL4022.jpg
    Last edited by jawnn; 05-26-2011 at 11:06 AM.

  23. #23
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Panaracer felted Kevlar liners—lightweight and they just work!
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  24. #24
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    Spec Crossroads Armadillo on commute bike and also on "best" bike ...... that solved the problem of punctures on my glass strewn daily commute route and for other rides on the best bike on some glass strewn routes. I use them pumped up near maximum recommended pressure. Only once or twice a year at the very most does a piece of glass or thorn get through.

    Every month or so I flick out all the embedded glass that didn't get through to the tube, with a sharp pointed probe ..... and boy, are some of those pieces of glass buried deep!

    Both bikes have done around 10,000Km each in 3 years on these tyres and apart from all the small "nicks" in the tread, the tread and walls look in good condition, plenty of life left in them. I'm told the Armadillos are heavy ....... seem average to me ....... but not enough other tyres to compare them to. Do me fine, anyway!

  25. #25
    Wanderer
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    I just use the Stans goop stuff to make my tires tubeless.

    It can be a bit of a pita to set up but I haven't had a flat in over 2 years (since I started using it).

  26. #26
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    Fouir pucntures in 2 years. One a field of broken berr bottles not easily seen untill too late in heavy traffic. Shard cut side wall. Two 1" roofing nails different roads over a year apart. One tiny piece of glass (too small to feel outside tire), causing a slow leak requiring topping off after and hour and a half. Kevlar kepp it from being a repair on the road.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toff View Post
    I just use the Stans goop stuff to make my tires tubeless.

    It can be a bit of a pita to set up but I haven't had a flat in over 2 years (since I started using it).
    +1

    I commute tubeless and its been great. I've pulled a 1" wood screw out of my sidewall, spun the wheel around and rode home. I converted about 6 months ago and haven't had a flat since. Before that the goat heads would get me every other week or so.
    Last edited by rashidkpc; 05-26-2011 at 08:46 PM.

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