For those who have fancy, pimped mt. bikes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    For those who have fancy, pimped mt. bikes

    Since this is a mtb site and I assume many if not all of you have another bike geared toward off-roading, I was wondering if some of you who commute with a no-frills, plain Jane bike sometimes take your pimped out mt. bike to work just for kicks or get a different ride feel, or just for change. If so, do you feel out of place riding it to work? Sorta like driving an SUV in the city sorta feeling. What sorta reaction do people at work say when they see a bike with, say, hydraulic brakes (let alone disc!), suspension, and all the shiny anodized parts?

  2. #2
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    I took my Morewood DH bike to work one day. People were shocked that a bike could cost that much.

    And shocked again when I pinned the stairs next to work when I was leaving at the end of the day.

  3. #3
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    I used to ride my low end hardtail to work everyday, no discs just high end Vee's on it. I started taking my Titus to work on fridays as a treat for me and taking the long trail direction home.

    One friday I noticed my Titus hanging from the bike lock as though it rolled out of the stand, didn't think anything of it. Next week my seat post was twisted 90 degrees (bolt on clamp), luckily I had tools to fix it. The week after that the handlebars were twisted, don't know how they managed that one because they were really tight and I couldn't twist them back by hand...probably got kicked

    I took it as a lesson, some people are small minded and exist just to urinate on other people, I went back to taking the hardtail and never brought the Titus again. I think there is a jealousy factor you have to consider not just theft, I now see why doctors have seperate parking lots at hospitals...the Porches would get trashed.

    This was in a bike space between buildings which required a key to enter and access to the University to get to it, it cost 5 dollars a month for parking but I thought it was the safest spot you could ever hope for...one guy even left his Kona unlocked all the time and it was lot nicer than my hardtail!

    I wouldn't do it again, too many buttwipes out there.

  4. #4
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    i ride my Merida 96 to work everyday. People usally look but i dont feel outta place. People are amazed how light a dually can be =]

  5. #5

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    I would love to ride my FS mountain bike to work but at 50 miles round trip it is a little long for this bike.

    My current commuter is a full rigid Niner MCR which has hydraulic disc brakes, a Titec H-Bar and a nice set of ZTR 355's but I suspect that very few people look at it and realize that by merely swapping wheelsets (too lazy to swap out tires) I have a very nice mountain bike.

  6. #6
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    Meah, I wouldn't say my commuter is fancy, but it does have discs, it's just a plain ol Surly Karate Monkey with mostly old parts thrown on, my other bike is a 4" FS Niner RIP9 with different Geo. On occassion I will ride the RIP9 to do minor commuting when I know I won't really need to lock it up outside anywhere OR I ride it if my backs giving troub le because the Geo suits me better than the Monkey.

    To 4JawChuck.......I'd have made sure to leave that bike there and watched it from a hidden location and found out who was doing it, then their car would start to have funny things start happening to it. Once people get the idea that it's your transportation and it needs to be treated with respect, then things stop happening.
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  7. #7
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    I don't have a dedicated commuter...my 29er is pretty much my do-all bike, though I do have a 26er that sees mostly DJ/Freeride use. I've gotten some compliments, as I work with a lot of people that also commute by bike. I've gotten a lot of questions about big wheels too.

    Fortunately, I work in a secured building and can bring my bike into work. Plus it's a small company, I don't really have to worry about co-workers messing with it.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  8. #8
    Drunken fool
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    I sometimes ride my S-works hardtail to work, but it's kind of anti-bling now. I had the frame resprayed, all the decals and markings from all the components were removed or sanded and resprayed as well. Hubs, rims, and spokes are all plain black, really the only thing that may stand out are the discs. Those are kinda hard to cover up. I did all that just to make it less of a target. No way would I ride my Titus to work, first it's a full susser and that would add too much weight and it's just too nice to me to leave it lying around out of my sight. I usually ride my Spesh roadie to work, it's a low end bike and so doesn't really stand out.
    You better take care of me, Lord. If you don't you're gonna have me on your hands.

  9. #9
    jfk
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    on average I get a morning trail ride in once a week, my wife will drop me off at work with my "real" mountain bike and I will ride it home after work. There are certainly fancier bikes then mine, I don't think it attracts any attention being a Gary Fisher X-cal hard tail (29er). Maybe some, but only from bike people. There are some pretty high end road bikes at work at times.

    Its kind of a pain to ride as I don't have a rack on it, I have to have my cycling shoes, and I have to carry bigger locks and cable for the wheels. Still, I think its faster then my commuter bike and way more fun. I am more apt to get lost on my way home and ride somewhere were I don't belong.

  10. #10
    Stay thirsty my friends
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    To 4JawChuck.......I'd have made sure to leave that bike there and watched it from a hidden location and found out who was doing it, then their car would start to have funny things start happening to it. Once people get the idea that it's your transportation and it needs to be treated with respect, then things stop happening.
    I was pretty sure it was a co-worker, he was the only nutjob I knew at the time that knew where I parked my bike. I kinda figured it out when I decided to replace my spare keys with a similar looking set in my desk just for giggles. His reaction over the next week told me he was the one doing it, he actually angrily confronted me asking me why I had swapped my keys out for ones that didn't work in any of the locks in the place we worked!

    I just said, "I don't know what you are talking about? Have you been going into my desk??"

    He used to tell me stories of how he would stalk women he knew and how he would vandalise people cars etc. In conversations with people he would try and get their address and phone numbers for later use, he used to call it "social engineering". Definetly someones nightmare thats for sure, he was a major reason why I left that job...and that was at a major hospital!
    Last edited by 4JawChuck; 06-18-2009 at 06:56 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4JawChuck
    I was pretty sure it was a co-worker, he was the only nutjob I knew at the time that knew where I parked my bike. I kinda figured it out when I decided to replace my spare keys with a similar looking set in my desk just for giggles. His reaction over the next week told me he was the one doing it, he actually angrily confronted me asking me why I had swapped my keys out for ones that didn't work in any of the locks in the place we worked!

    I just said, "I don't know what you are talking about? Have you been going into my desk??"

    He used to tell me stories of how he would stalk women he knew and how he would vandalise people cars etc. In conversations with people he would try and get their address and phone numbers for later use, he used to call it "social engineering". Definetly someones nightmare thats for sure, he was a major reason why I left that job...and that was at a major hospital!
    Sounds like your coworker needed to be admitted to the psych unit in your hospital and worked up for Anti-social Disorder! Or he needed to be given a ride to the wrong side of town. I often find fools like that are really cowards on the inside. Glad you didn't have more damage to your bike.

    What is your profession. I work in a hospital too.

  12. #12
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    Usually I ride my cross bike with fenders, but every other Wednesday, I do a MTB ride or race after work, so I take my full suspension MTB. It is not that much slower, and the wide tires really smooth out the potholes.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4JawChuck
    I was pretty sure it was a co-worker, he was the only nutjob I knew at the time that knew where I parked my bike. I kinda figured it out when I decided to replace my spare keys with a similar looking set in my desk just for giggles. His reaction over the next week told me he was the one doing it, he actually angrily confronted me asking me why I had swapped my keys out for ones that didn't work in any of the locks in the place we worked!

    I just said, "I don't know what you are talking about? Have you been going into my desk??"

    He used to tell me stories of how he would stalk women he knew and how he would vandalise people cars etc. In conversations with people he would try and get their address and phone numbers for later use, he used to call it "social engineering". Definetly someones nightmare thats for sure, he was a major reason why I left that job...and that was at a major hospital!
    Sounds like you should have reported him to your HR department.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork
    Since this is a mtb site and I assume many if not all of you have another bike geared toward off-roading, I was wondering if some of you who commute with a no-frills, plain Jane bike sometimes take your pimped out mt. bike to work just for kicks or get a different ride feel, or just for change. If so, do you feel out of place riding it to work? Sorta like driving an SUV in the city sorta feeling. What sorta reaction do people at work say when they see a bike with, say, hydraulic brakes (let alone disc!), suspension, and all the shiny anodized parts?
    Since I work at the bike shop, no one at work would think twice about seeing me ride to work on my XC race bike. I also commute in the winter, and they probably would be surprised to see me without a mountain bike in conditions like these...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfG1kjwVgi4


    ^ not the XC-race bike, obviously

  15. #15
    Off the back...
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    I've never taken the "good" mountain bike to work. It's too damn slow! My commute is all on roads, so it's skinny tires for me. I did take my "good" road bike to work once. I think I cut 20% off my ride time. Unfortunately, I was worried about it all day, despite the fact that it was in a secure lockup. It used to be that bike thieves assumed all road bikes were crappy $100 10-speeds, but now they know the brands. Combine Cervelo, carbon and Chorus in one spot - it's a target.

  16. #16
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    I've gone to friends' houses or the taco stand every once in a while.
    I like puttin the seat low w/ my big forks and pretending I'm on a chopper
    now, if only I had some old banana-seat cruiser handlebars to act as ape-hangers...
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4JawChuck
    I
    I took it as a lesson, some people are small minded and exist just to urinate on other people, I went back to taking the hardtail and never brought the Titus again. I think there is a jealousy factor you have to consider not just theft, I now see why doctors have seperate parking lots at hospitals...the Porches would get trashed.

    I wouldn't do it again, too many buttwipes out there.
    4jaw that sucks,
    Someone is totally hating your Titus.
    ever thought of taking it with you to your office? "They" probably won't allow that! I have to sneak my bike in thru the underground parking.

    I get nervouse taking my mt. bike for making a blockbuster run. everything is QR or Maxle.
    I hoping people in my neighborhood don't know mt. bikes dont even look at it. They sure know Porsches, Bmws and Audis.

  18. #18
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    I would never ride my mountain bikes to work, only because it's too far. It would take me forever. I'm pretty fortunate in that our building is set way back from the road and the bike rack is in a small courtyard guarded from the street by high shrubs. We have guards on staff 24/7 and the bike racks are 30 feet away from their desk, visible directly through a huge glass wall. They all know it's my bike out there and keep an eye on it for me. Because of that, I do ride my fancy road bike to work and not worry about it
    :wq

  19. #19
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    Unfortunately, for now my worksite is too far away to even think about commuting to it (34 miles one way)

    Year before last I used to commute at least twice a week to my office at the plant (about 14 miles one way.) I was able to roll my bicycle into the building and leave it in my office. The office building also had a convienent shower for me to use and change into my office clothes.

    Last year I worked at Diablo Canyon Power Plant, and unfortunately they don't allow bicycles to ride on their access road. I had to leave it locked up on the rack next to the guard rack at the bottom of the canyon and thumb a ride up to the plant (8 miles away). I didn't like that much, as I couldn't always count on a ride. So again, I rode my motorcycle.

    Maybe in a couple months I'll get assigned to a project that is a bit closer to home (10 miles or so) and can start commuting on my (one and only - Jamis Dakota 29er) bike again.

    To make up for that I'm riding my motorcycle.... so at least I'm still on two wheels.

    Chuck: I would never have let a problem with a coworker like that make me leave a job that I enjoyed. Problems like that sound like it can be solved with an aluminum baseball bat

  20. #20
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    I rode my SC Nomad once. About 20 miles each way on the American River bike path in Sacramento. It wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be. Thing is pretty DH ready..weighs about 36 pounds and has coil shocks on both ends and 2.35 knobs. The worst part is feeling all of your energy get sucked up by the suspension with every pedal stroke.
    The folks in my office were clueless...they just thought it was a stange looking bike.
    I didn't dare tell them how much it cost. Hard to fight for a raise when you're riding a "toy" like that....
    To insanity and beyond.....

  21. #21
    Stay thirsty my friends
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    I used to work in Clinical Engineering at this hospital, talking with HR would have been of no use without proof. Besides HR departments only exist to limit liability for the employer, they are not there to serve the employee...its a common misconception.

    I once read a study of psycotic behaviour and it found that the highest percentage of the behaviour tended to occur in professions where there was a high likelyhood of them being able to control others and where there would be a large percentage of individuals there that would be unassuming and easy to control.

    Policing, hospitals, corrections officers, large corporate middle management etc. All professions where it is easy pickings for unassuming people to prey on. After my experiences there I realized there are many people around you that could qualify as having this behavioural trait under the right conditions.

    Generally I stay away from people that exhibit the following traits when I meet them as a result of my experience working closely with a couple of them.

    1) Expressionless, never smile or exhibit "glee" unless it is while causing harm/duress to other people.

    2) Pathological liars, they do not hesitate to lie to people even if there is no disadvantage to telling the truth.

    3) Heavy drinkers, the faculty in the brain that permits the concept of a "conscience" is dulled in people that drink heavily regularly..in fact it can be permanently damaged.

    4) Alterior motive seeking behaviour, there is always a reason for doing what they are doing and it is either self serving, designed to hurt someone else or done to put themselves in a position to control someone else.

    5) Conscienceless behaviour, this behaviour is the kind you would see from someone who would kick a friends animal while they weren't looking, or kill animals for no purpose other than the act of killing (hunting for meat is not the same).

    6) Skill in using technological methods to cause harm, my co-worker figured out how to manipulate the internal hospital phone system to eavesdrop on co-workers by using a priority phone (red handset) inside the hospital and then entering a code to connect the internal microphone, he literally spent hours eavesdropping on co-workers. Another good little trick I learned from watching him was how he could "phreak" a normal numerical pager by sending it text through the internet based paging service, he could harrass people this way as the output on the pager end was "strange" ASCII characters appearing on the display. All of these methods of harassment were untraceable using normal methods, as I mentioned he was always looking for a way to "social engineer" someone. It took me 3 years to figure out what he was doing and how he did it.

    In the end I figured it was easier to leave than catch him in the act and turn him in, the union would have found a way for him to retain his job anyway and once you expose an individual like that, you would forever be a target...they never forget.

    Anywho, I learned far more than I ever wanted to know about psycotics working there since I found it facinating to study their habits and figure out the behavioural drive to perform the acts they do, I used to have coffee everyday with a professor who taught me more than I ever wanted to know about the disease. There are DR's that specialize in nothing but this type of personality disorder, the ingenuity of some of them is truly amazing and just because they are sick does not mean they are incapable of having a normal life or working a regular job.

    As a matter of fact they can be very successful, corporate structuring tends to reward them.

  22. #22
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    My work is only just over 2 miles away. It's a secure compound with CCTV, security gaurds who patrol the grounds and I can have a shower at work. No reason not to take my pimped out Heckler. A "proper" commuting bike would just use up space I don't have.

  23. #23
    responsible zombie owner
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    "Definetly someones nightmare thats for sure, he was a major reason why I left that job...and that was at a major hospital!"

    Sounds like you worked with the janitor in 'Scrubs'...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4JawChuck
    3) Heavy drinkers, the faculty in the brain that permits the concept of a "conscience" is dulled in people that drink heavily regularly..in fact it can be permanently damaged.
    I have too much conscience. I will proceed down this path.
    :wq

  25. #25
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    I have one bike right now, a second one on the books for rebuild, but the main ride will remain my Dakar XLT, 5.7 f/r travel. Suss bob? DON'T HAVE IT! And I'm plenty fast enough on this bike -- it's faster than the city bus! I arrive at work in good spirits, smiling, nearly EVERY DAY. My only regret is that I have to get off the bike at work, and can't keep going. Oh, and my bike comes in the building with me, and hangs from ahook about 10 feet away from my work station. My managers understand that it's a $2K bike, and that we are in a higher-crime area, but I've taken the bike in the building for eight years now.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  26. #26

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    I have taken my recreational/event (as opposed to workhorse) rides to work.
    Nobody blinked an eye (but I found folks were either cyclist themselves, so I guess they would check it out - or they knew me as "jim the bike" guy so it wasn't a deal)

    Now being a full-time commuter and power tour guy (was out of daily car culture for about a decade) - I had to approach things a little differently -- my transport rides weren't necessarilly the "cheapie" bike as they NEEDED to perform reliably and efficiently (lest my ass not get there)
    Now, since they needed to work in a wider performance envelope (across a variety of conditions) they wouldn't necessarilly be so specialized (and sometimes the simpler stuff was better for field servicability) so their performance in an extremely narrow band wouldn't be as peaked up -- but the area under the curve was abt the same, possibly greater and often a more involved balancing act to find the performance "sweetspot"
    While, not as glamorous - my commute rides would often be crypto cool -- so they'd go less noticed by non/casual cyclists, but get the subtle "niiiiice" from the more involved cyclist

  27. #27
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    [QUOTE=Sounds like you worked with the janitor in 'Scrubs'...[/QUOTE]

    watch what you say about janitorial work I had to do it for a half year. HEAR is an idea why don't you do it for that length of time and see how crappy it is and then you can talk smack about the job otherwise that is just simply a rude comment. do you have any idea what it is like to have doctors and nurses downing you because you were a cleaning person. I didn't think so.

  28. #28
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 4JawChuck
    3) Heavy drinkers, the faculty in the brain that permits the concept of a "conscience" is dulled in people that drink heavily regularly..in fact it can be permanently damaged.


    Quote Originally Posted by nachomc
    I have too much conscience. I will proceed down this path.
    class!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by GpzGuy
    Problems like that sound like it can be solved with an aluminum baseball bat
    (Clint Eastwood)..."Nothing beats a good piece of hickory"


    I actually enjoy riding my hardtail MTB to work. It allows me to curb hop and take dirt trails rather than have to stick to the paved routes.
    You better take care of me, Lord. If you don't you're gonna have me on your hands.

  30. #30
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    I simply swap out my wheels when I feel like riding to work. I couldn't justify buying a road bike when all I had to do was buy two $15 slickasaurus tires. All I do is swap out my wheels, lock my SID fork, and hit the road.

  31. #31
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    I commute on my old rigid MTB. I have a hardtail 29er, but I kind of like "saving" it for the weekends. The fact that I only get to ride it once or twice a week makes me look forward to it all the more.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  32. #32
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    For fear of being billed as a traitor, I'm going to say this anyway:
    I usually commute on a road bike (It's got cross tires ) but I took my Tracer to work one day and the first thing I heard when I walked through the door was my intern yell "holy f*ck!" Then I was hoarded. I'm lucky i came out of that alive
    Good luck with that, mister 300-Mile Turn Radius.

  33. #33
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    I've spoiled myself with my road bike too much. I've tried leisurely road rides with my mountain that were half of my commute and it sucked. A large portion of my commute is rolling hills.... the rolling resistance of my 2.5 knobbies killed my momentum too much.

  34. #34
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    I have a beach cruiser for booze and groceries. I normally ride an older full suspension bike for trails and streets. It's a lot faster and lighter than my cruiser. The cruiser has a large basket that can support a 30 rack if nessary and that's it's advantage over the mountain bike. A strong basket would not work cause of the suspension and plus it's dorky on a mtb.

    I think my fancy bouncy mountain bike is great for commuting. I can jump over things, ride through sketchy **** and stuff. You can really do that with a road bike. I am a short distance bike commuter than uses the bus. I perfer to get off the bus on top of hills and go downhill. I fly through town.

  35. #35
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    I actually ride mine everywhere. I did put drop bars and 26x1 tire on it so its not a complete MTB anymore but it really doesnt feel odd even before i switched over the parts.

  36. #36
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    i dont own a mtb (yet), but i have a really expensive bmx cruiser that is currently my only bike. i ride it to work (about 15 miles one way) once a week. i work in a commercial kitchen and my boss lets me keep it in her office. but the boss of the whole building hates that and thinks i should keep it on the rack out front like everyone else. if i had a cheapo commuter i would have no problem, but i dont, and i kindly explained to her that my bike probably cost more than her 1st car. she doesnt bother me anymore about it. But....the first time i brought it to work, i get finished with my shift and go to grab my bike....not there. so i started freaking out. turns out the stupid wench took it out front and put it in the bike rack with no lock! i wanted to slash her tires lol. oh well, at least it didnt get stolen

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by blazemaster83
    i dont own a mtb (yet), but i have a really expensive bmx cruiser that is currently my only bike. i ride it to work (about 15 miles one way) once a week. i work in a commercial kitchen and my boss lets me keep it in her office. but the boss of the whole building hates that and thinks i should keep it on the rack out front like everyone else. if i had a cheapo commuter i would have no problem, but i dont, and i kindly explained to her that my bike probably cost more than her 1st car. she doesnt bother me anymore about it. But....the first time i brought it to work, i get finished with my shift and go to grab my bike....not there. so i started freaking out. turns out the stupid wench took it out front and put it in the bike rack with no lock! i wanted to slash her tires lol. oh well, at least it didnt get stolen
    Holy sh1t! Did you talk to her? Did you do anything? You should have smashed out the windows on her car and left her doors open and see how she likes it.

    JK, but I'm serious about the first part.
    Good luck with that, mister 300-Mile Turn Radius.

  38. #38
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    I usually take my Jamis Nova 'cross bike, 23c road tires in the summer, 32c 'cross tires in the fall and (occassionally) winter. I have ridden my Titus Motolite a couple of times so I could get in a trail ride right after work. For my 5ish mile commute, if I don't stretch it with a workout ride, it's just under 20 minutes with skinny tires, 25 with 'cross tires, and 30 with the mountain bike with sus locked out.

    People seem most intrigued with the Titus, which is much blingier than the Jamis.

    David B.

    p.s. I bring them all right into my hallway.

  39. #39
    MONKEYMAN
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    Jul 2006
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    Sits in my cube 2ft. away from me. It's bling but there aren't many people in my office who ride so they don't really get just how bling.

    It's a retrotec 29er with 2.35 up front and 2.1 in the rear. I ride it just about everywhere but never lock it up. If I can't bring it inside with me then it doesn't get to go.
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  40. #40
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
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    Feb 2008
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    697
    Quote Originally Posted by 4JawChuck
    I used to ride my low end hardtail to work everyday, no discs just high end Vee's on it. I started taking my Titus to work on fridays as a treat for me and taking the long trail direction home.

    One friday I noticed my Titus hanging from the bike lock as though it rolled out of the stand, didn't think anything of it. Next week my seat post was twisted 90 degrees (bolt on clamp), luckily I had tools to fix it. The week after that the handlebars were twisted, don't know how they managed that one because they were really tight and I couldn't twist them back by hand...probably got kicked

    I took it as a lesson, some people are small minded and exist just to urinate on other people, I went back to taking the hardtail and never brought the Titus again. I think there is a jealousy factor you have to consider not just theft, I now see why doctors have seperate parking lots at hospitals...the Porches would get trashed.

    This was in a bike space between buildings which required a key to enter and access to the University to get to it, it cost 5 dollars a month for parking but I thought it was the safest spot you could ever hope for...one guy even left his Kona unlocked all the time and it was lot nicer than my hardtail!

    I wouldn't do it again, too many buttwipes out there.
    That sucks. I'd have sat in the cage for a whole day cradling a baseball bat and told anyone who asked that you were looking for the guy messing with your bike.

    Seriously, did you report this to the University? Campus Security? Let them do their jobs...

    And I don't commute with my Mountain bike. Well not entirely true, I do once in a great while, generally as a shake down ride with a new bike or after something has been repaired. I'd rather have it break down within a mile from home than 20 miles into a trail...
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  41. #41
    Double-metric mtb man
    Reputation: Psycho Mike's Avatar
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    Apr 2006
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    4,482
    Well, I had been using my Fisher Cake 2 DLX for the commute...it was great to hit the MUT's and ST for the commute home when I could get dirty . I picked up a Kona Jake CX bike for the Ride to Conquer Cancer and it'll be doing commuting duty from this point on....I have really miled up the Cake and the racks on the Jake are much better for commuting.

    I had a bunch of co-workers (and a fellow forum member who saw me on my commute) surprised I was using a FS mtb for commuting...until they saw me jumping curbs, pullin' wheelies and such and figured I can/do live up to my screen name
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  42. #42
    bike the planet!
    Reputation:
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle0614
    watch what you say about janitorial work I had to do it for a half year. HEAR is an idea why don't you do it for that length of time and see how crappy it is and then you can talk smack about the job otherwise that is just simply a rude comment. do you have any idea what it is like to have doctors and nurses downing you because you were a cleaning person. I didn't think so.
    Chill out bro. He's talking about a fictional character from a TV show, not insulting actual janitorial staff.

  43. #43
    LCI #1853
    Reputation: PscyclePath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    328
    I rode my "fancy, pimped-up" Fisher as a commuter for four or five months before I finally invested in a dedicated commuter bike. I still bring to work from time to time when the weather's bad and the bike trail out back is a little gumped-up...

    Biggest issue was carrying stuff, which I finally resolved with a Chrome Mini-Metro bag.
    Ride a mountain bike... you will not regret it if you live.
    (with apologies to Mark Twain & The Taming of the Bicycle)

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