Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples

    I know!

    Awesome tires, and my old ones (29er, 2.35")have officially been retired after rolling over 5000 miles (never rotated front to back, could have gotten more). But I got some Small Block 8's for the mountian bike this summer, and I really like them...they are a very fast rolling tire that might do pretty good in the snow and slop this winter.

    I'm thinking about moving the pretty new small blocks over to the commuter and getting something else for the mountain bike (more small blocks?)

    Currently rolling on $10 Kenda Kwests (35c) that I had on an old bike...I feel like I'm on borrowed time with them...

    Talk some sense into me?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Talk some sense into me?
    Evryone knows that is not possible......still gonna ride the cold old running shoes this winter?

  3. #3
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    The Small Blocks will wear out pretty quickly on pavement. My gf pretty much trashed a new rear SB8 on her old bike when she was injured, couldnt ride her SS road bike and had to commute on her mountain bike while rehabbing the foot injury. Within about 4-6 weeks the tire was bald.

    Why even run such a big slick tire? A set of 28s will have plenty of cushion, 32s and 35s even more so. Riding my dirt jumper around town on 2.35 slicks is kinda fun but that bike runs out of gearing right about the time those big tires start dragging from aerodynamics.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Evryone knows that is not possible......still gonna ride the cold old running shoes this winter?
    I would never ride in running shoes. They are cold old $35 shimano SPD shoes that I got in 1998.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    The Small Blocks will wear out pretty quickly on pavement. My gf pretty much trashed a new rear SB8 on her old bike when she was injured, couldnt ride her SS road bike and had to commute on her mountain bike while rehabbing the foot injury. Within about 4-6 weeks the tire was bald.

    Why even run such a big slick tire? A set of 28s will have plenty of cushion, 32s and 35s even more so. Riding my dirt jumper around town on 2.35 slicks is kinda fun but that bike runs out of gearing right about the time those big tires start dragging from aerodynamics.
    Did your GF's SB8's have the 'dual tread compound' that's supposed to wear slower? I haven't ridden mine much on pavement, but that's enlightening to hear... maybe I should get the BA's and just swap wheelsets for days when I want more traction.

    As for the big slick thing... after 2 years on the BA's, 28's are like riding on solid wooden wheels, 32's and even 35's are barely any better. I'm spoiled. Plus, my commute is partly on dirt roads, and sometimes singletrack. The BA's have been cushy, fast, and bombproof...the only downside has been uphill traction on switchback-singletrack-with-pine-needles. I have thought about going down to the 2.0 size, but whatever I get will be at least 1.5", just because of my commute. If it was all street I could agree with you more...
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  6. #6
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    Yep with the DTC compound. But her commute was all city streets so if you have dirt on your commute YMMV. Shame because the side knobs are still almost new but the center is worn out.

  7. #7
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    Well dang. I knew this thread would be helpful... I'm already leaning back towards the BA's. Anyone using the 29er 2.0's? I have only ridden the 2.35's.
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  8. #8
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    Well for what it's worth, I just ordered a set of 29x2.3 Origin8 Captiv8rs. Figured for $20 each they're worth a try, and should have more cush than the 40mm Kenda's I'm running now.
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  9. #9
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    Some of the new offerings from Vee Rubber look like they would be nice commuter tires:
    Vee Rubber :. USA

    I'm a huge Continental fan on my road bikes but not sure if they have anything in your size range.

    Not sure if you're getting the pain in your hands or your rear end but I know quite a few guys that run staggered tire setups on their road bikes and commuters. Skinnier tire up front for aerodynamics and weight, and a fatter tire out back for comfort.

  10. #10
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    Look into the Kenda Happy Medium. Looks like a promising tire for on/off road use. Comes in CX tire sizes all the way up to 29x2.1 I believe.

  11. #11
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    ^ Ooh those are promising. I wonder how long they live and how they do tubeless...
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    ^ Ooh those are promising. I wonder how long they live and how they do tubeless...
    I'm considering ordering a set in either 700x40 or 29x2.1. Heard at least one positive review of them. Haven't done much research. Apparently they only make a UST version in a 26" size. I would imagine that the folding 29er version would probably convert successfully. Hard to say, hadn't considered setting them up tubeless myself.

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    My Sefas Drifter 29x2's still look brand new after 1500 miles of commuting.
    Zero flats, only downside is a weird sucking noise when cornering on wet pavement.

  14. #14
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    Ha. I just got on here to say that after doing a ton of reading, I ordered a pair of Serfas Drifters in the 29x2.0 size. Good to hear (again) that they hold up well. I'm thinking they might do better on my dirt/trail option routes than the Big Apples did.... we shall see. I haven't read anything about anybody setting them up tubeless... I'll give it a go.

    Cool about the sucking noise! That will be fun.
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    Don't mess with success.

  16. #16
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    Just recently

    ive been rolling the 40c Clement Xplor MSO on the swobo and soon on a 2nd double cross. Think of a small block 8 with a harder casing, more volume and 90psi.

    <img src=https://clementcycling.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/MSO_34-1024x773.jpg>



    Clement also makes a 35c Xplor USH

    <img src=https://clementcycling.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/USH_34-e1335388147475.jpg>

  17. #17
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    ^^ I don't know about 90psi and tubeless... I ran the BA's at around 35. anything under about 40c and over around 60psi just doesn't work for the looser, single-trackier portions of my commute.
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  18. #18
    jrm
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    Well

    its working for me...so far.

  19. #19
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    What about some cyclocross tyres?

  20. #20
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    ^^ Again, I'm totally spoiled on the fat size for soaking up the dirt road and trail performance. I'm taking a step down to 2.0, but I have high hopes for these Serfas Drifters.

    I have used Vittoria Randonneur (sp?) 'cross tires, and they were pretty solid, and great on wet pavement, but they rode like a 700x30ish tire (because they were). They couldn't handle the trail, and were bone-rattling by nature because of the high psi. I'm on 700x38 Kenda Kwests now, and they feel harsh and not confident in soft corners on the trail. I have a road bike for being timid on the dirt road and sticking to the pavement once I get there. I need my main commuter to be all an Ogre can be, ya know?
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  21. #21
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    I await your review kind sir.

  22. #22
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    I took the long trail route home yesterday, just for comparison's sake... I'm on 38c Kendas at the moment, 70psi. It was B R U T A L. Granted, they're fairly slick tires. Some sections were OK, but I was sinking in all the soft stuff, sliding downhill on all the sidehill stuff, and there's one switchback-filled climb that was particularly bad... if my line wasn't absolutely perfect, it was over. It's a full-on mountain bike trail, with rocks, etc...so I'm just in need of something more substantial in terms of a tire. I need a smoothed-down mountain bike tire, not a beefed-up road tire.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Evryone knows that is not possible......
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    you know it is coming
    I`m going to see if one of the sports books is taking odds on this one.

  25. #25
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    I found the SB8's to flat fairly easily so I would consider something else.

  26. #26
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    Jeffscott, actually that's another reason I'm excited about the Serfas Drifters... only $30 a pop, so I actually have a stud fund started at this point. I think this could be the year I actually do it. I have a spare cassette, brake rotor, and plan on robbing the wheelset from the singlespeed...

    Last year was my record year, only 3.5 driving days...and it was a very mellow winter. I can't imagine beating that without studs.
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  27. #27
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    Ooh, I'm excited about these. Seems to be a pretty hard rubber compound, definitely lots of life there, with the 'reverse tread' thing going on, and at least some good potential for better trail performance than the BA's. If they work half as good as they look, I'll be a satisfied customer.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples-picture1.jpg  

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  28. #28
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    I`ve had a 26 x 1.5 Drifter on my bent since the bike was assembled, used to be one of two that started about four bikes back. It isn`t what I`d call plush, but it`s tough for sure, and I think the one remaining has set record for bike tire lifespan without dryrotting. Not many miles, but a lot of lounging in the elements. I have no idea what happened to the other one- bunnies ate it? And yeah, I think the tread looks cool

  29. #29
    jrm
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    Are those tire stud

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Ooh, I'm excited about these. Seems to be a pretty hard rubber compound, definitely lots of life there, with the 'reverse tread' thing going on, and at least some good potential for better trail performance than the BA's. If they work half as good as they look, I'll be a satisfied customer.
    ready?

  30. #30
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    Isn't any tire stud ready? Just add screws.
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  31. #31
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    One thing I've noticed about the BAs is that their cross-section is kind of parabolic, instead of being round. When I put the bike into a really sharp lean I find they're pretty twitchy. There's a little chicane on my route to work where I spook myself every morning.

    Mine probably won't need replacing for years, and it's not a big problem (it's more my need to fly through the chicane), but whenever I do replace them I figure I'll probably go with something more urban/bmxish like the sb8 or holyroller.

  32. #32
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    ^^ I have felt that effect. They kind of want to pull the wheel harder into the corner than you want it to go.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Duderino View Post
    Don't mess with success.
    +1 except it looks like Schwalbe has redesigned Big Apples? That is something of a betrayal as far as I am concerned. Unless I am wrong of course. But this tire:



    isn't the BA I know and trust.



    I actually liked the liteskins and they did away with those too. I have experimented w/ the marathon supremes but the 700x40s I ran seem to want to be a skinny high-pressure tire not a comfy low pressure tire, so I don't trust the 700 x 50s of those.

    So I would say if you can get old BAs then do that but otherwise can't really fault you for trying something different.

  34. #34
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    I have been running WTB Bronson 2.2s , but my ride is 60% dirt. I was concerned about the rolling resistance, but it's not that bad. I don't think they will last very long through. Every choice is a compromise.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    you know it is coming
    After last year's sorry excuse for a winter, I'm not even sure I'm going to mount the studded tires on their wheelset.

    For the entire "winter" they just leaned against the basement wall and felt sorry for themselves while I rode 25C road tires. And wore shorts in March.
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  36. #36
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    I didn't know the new BA's were different... I was still seeing the old ones all over online, unless people just haven't updated their thumbnail pictures on the websites. The only area they really lacked for me was when the pine needles got wet and I took the trail home...uphill, switchbacks...they were obviously not designed for that, so not their fault. I was completely impressed with them in just about every other area. Even most trail situations...they were loose, but very predictably loose, and the low pressure and massive contact patch made them way more grippy than you'd think. Obviously they were fast on the road, and perfect in my opinion for the dirt road and gravel road/rail trail type stuff. I got 5k miles out of the rear without rotating, went on a 7 day tour with them and felt like I was riding a Cadlillac, and they set up easily tubeless.

    My hope with the Drifters is that they'll improve on the off-road performance without giving up too much in the other areas. I'm assuming they'll be a little more harsh just based on volume, but they're still a 2.0, so it shouldn't be much.

    I'll get them on there this weekend...
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  37. #37
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    I wondered about the New And Improved BAs also. There`s strangely little information about the differences, so I posted a thread on BFnet to see what the verdict was. Not a lot of help, but maybe its something:

    New style (430) Big Apples

  38. #38
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    These Drifters are the easiest tires I've ever set up tubeless... 10 minute job, and they've only lost something like 5 psi in the first day. That NEVER happens.
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  39. #39
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    Sounds like good news to me.

  40. #40
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    Well I like 'em. I'd say they roll just a tiny bit slower than the BA's, and they have just enough of a vibration there to let you know that there is a hint of tread down there. The vibration increases as you lean into corners and get the 'reverse tread' section to fully contact the ground. They are a little lighter than the BA's, but they're still a heavy tire. I'm hitting the trails after work so I'll have a singletrack opinion later, but they soak up the dirt road and give me a lot of confidence on the loose stuff, for sure. No issues with the tubeless set-up, they lost between 1 and 2 psi on day 2...probably holding air better than most tubes. A tiny bit of seepage at the bead, but none on the sidewalls.

    And I think they look killer.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples-picture1.jpg  

    Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples-picture2.jpg  

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  41. #41
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    I replaced my knobbies with a set of Drifters on my Giant hardtail over the weekend. Put 25 miles on them yesterday and I am very pleased with them!!

  42. #42
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    I hope they're good, I jumped the gun and pulled the trigger on a set for my 29er.

    What pressure are you running them for your commute?
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Beware the saddle sniffer.

  43. #43
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    They are at 40psi currently (keep in mind they're set up tubeless, so you can get away with lower pressures). This is probably too much. I'll have to try them with less (and maybe more) to see how they act. They feel pretty hard, I'm assuming 40 is going to feel too hard when I take the trail. They are rated up to 60psi according to the sidewall.
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  44. #44
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    Hey CB, are you using prestas or schaeders for your tubeless?

    I'm in the process of switching my 3 bikes back to tubed. Tubeless is cool, but in my 2 years of tubelessness I've spent 10x more time fussing with my tires than I ever would have spent with tubes. And I think that's mostly due to the removable-core prestas which seem to constantly find new ways to vex me.

  45. #45
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    I cut old prestas out of dead tubes, and use the little supplied nut to tighten them down. I've never used the removable core ones. I just break the bead of the tire and pour in more sealant every 5 or 9 months. Once the tire is seated, it's no big deal to break the bead in one spot and get it to pop back into place. I currently have 3 tubeless bikes. I mix my own sealant, and I've gotten 10 months between re-charges (that was probably pushing it).
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    ^ I've got the removable core ones, which might be part of the problem. I've never been more frustrated than one time last winter where I couldn't air up my tire because everytime I removed my handpump the presta core would unscrew. Temperatures below freezing, and I swear I was ready to toss my bike off a bridge. And if the core isn't too loose, then it's too tight and is impossible to remove, and you end up having to break the bead anyway. And now even the stupid supplied nut keeps sticking...I hate them so much.

    Anyway, I'll probably go back to tubeless at some point, but for fall/winter I'm back to tubes that I'll fill with my homebrew if I have a leak.

  47. #47
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    ^^ It's always freezing out when those kinds of demons show up. Sorry man, you hate to see someone abandon such luxurious technology. My experience has been trouble-free.

    I thought about getting the removable core ones, but a standard presta cut out of a tube works great. I found that cutting the ones out of road tubes makes tire install easier (narrower, so the bead of the tire doesn't interfere with the rubber part inside the rim while you're trying to seat the bead).
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ I've got the removable core ones, which might be part of the problem. I've never been more frustrated than one time last winter where I couldn't air up my tire because everytime I removed my handpump the presta core would unscrew. Temperatures below freezing, and I swear I was ready to toss my bike off a bridge. And if the core isn't too loose, then it's too tight and is impossible to remove, and you end up having to break the bead anyway. And now even the stupid supplied nut keeps sticking...I hate them so much.

    Anyway, I'll probably go back to tubeless at some point, but for fall/winter I'm back to tubes that I'll fill with my homebrew if I have a leak.
    Something is not going around for me here...

    I have ridden tubeless through the winter with removable core presta valves.... conti tubes cut up, stans, and Mavic. Never had that sort of problem....

  49. #49
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    ^ they were just the conti ones cut out of old tubes. And it probably really depends the pump. I've got one of the leyzne ones with a hose that screws onto the valve stem. I was using one of the stans tools to tighten the core, but couldn't get it tight enough that the pump hose wouldn't unthread it. Since then I've started carrying a small adjustable wrench to tighten the core, but that usually just means I overtighten it, and it's a pita to remove it and going through the bead is easier.

    But using a handpump to air up a 29x2.25 tire, only to have it whoosh back out everytime you remove the pump. Start over, and have the same thing happen. And repeat...

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ they were just the conti ones cut out of old tubes. And it probably really depends the pump. I've got one of the leyzne ones with a hose that screws onto the valve stem. I was using one of the stans tools to tighten the core, but couldn't get it tight enough that the pump hose wouldn't unthread it. Since then I've started carrying a small adjustable wrench to tighten the core, but that usually just means I overtighten it, and it's a pita to remove it and going through the bead is easier.

    But using a handpump to air up a 29x2.25 tire, only to have it whoosh back out everytime you remove the pump. Start over, and have the same thing happen. And repeat...
    Buddy has a floor type leyzne pump....I used it last week not cold but it didn't have any effect on my valve stems...

    I can certainly see your pain.....but I have not had the problem...with a normal presta inflator....cold or not.

  51. #51
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    newf, I'd ditch the stems, but not the tubeless!! don't do it!! Simple is better... just use normal stems, and it sounds like your troubles are over.
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  52. #52
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    I really didn't want to hijack your thread anymore with this, but since you insist :

    I also find that the wss homebrew is really messy. I just switched over one tire last week, and it took an hour to clean all the crap out. And my gorillatape rim strip was a solid mass of boogers and was beyond cleaning (after about 2 years...so fair enough) so I just tore it out and put in a new one.

    (The main thing though, is that I'm in a condo. I've got underground parking to do my tire setups in, but it's definitely not as nice as having an actual garage.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    I really didn't want to hijack your thread anymore with this, but since you insist :

    I also find that the wss homebrew is really messy. I just switched over one tire last week, and it took an hour to clean all the crap out. And my gorillatape rim strip was a solid mass of boogers and was beyond cleaning (after about 2 years...so fair enough) so I just tore it out and put in a new one.

    (The main thing though, is that I'm in a condo. I've got underground parking to do my tire setups in, but it's definitely not as nice as having an actual garage.)
    You are looking for a UST rim simplfies just about everything.

  54. #54
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    Well to bring it back on topic ...

    I had the rare opportunity to get a good long ride in after work on what just happened to be the first day on these tires. It wound up being a 18 mile outing... up the local rail trail for some nice gravel miles, and a combination of logging roads and moderate-to-technical singletrack on the way back. For the commute, peppered with this type of riding (which is basically EXACTLY what this bike sees), I think I've found the perfect tire. They are definitely better than the BA's for trail use...that little bit of tread goes a long way. I was always rather impressed at how well the BA's did on the trail in spite of the lack of 'real' tread, so that's saying a lot...I got into some rutted, rocky logging road stuff, and was really, really impressed at how confidently I could ride myself up out of logging truck ruts without sliding around, etc. I got into a few really rocky sections (one is pictured), and they did really well. On the more typical singletrack kind of stuff, they were very predictable in terms of when they would break loose (which was definitely AFTER the BA's would have broken loose).
    One thing's for sure though, they are more harsh than the BA's. That little bit of volume that you give up from a 2.35 really makes a difference. I'm going to continue to lower the pressure for the trail until I am a little happier there... overall I'm completely impressed though.
    Oh, and they lost ZERO psi on the first day of being ridden (23+ miles on every kind of terrain) tubeless. No sidewall seepage, which is huge. most MTB tires will get some sidewall seep-holes the first few times they're ridden. These things are stout.


    I think they're going to be F-F-F-Fine.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples-picture1.jpg  

    Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples-picture2.jpg  

    Thinking about NOT getting another set of Big Apples-picture3.jpg  

    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  55. #55
    weirdo
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    Hmmm...
    that tunnel looks familiar. Glad you`re digging the new rubber.

  56. #56
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    ^^ Hadn't ridden up there in a while Rodar...it's really a beautiful ride. If you go up past where it crosses under the highway, you can cut back on the other side of the canyon on singletrack/logging roads. Great ride with everything.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  57. #57
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    Good stuff. And your bikes always make me want to try dropbars, darnnit.

  58. #58
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    ^^ Hadn't ridden up there in a while Rodar...it's really a beautiful ride. If you go up past where it crosses under the highway, you can cut back on the other side of the canyon on singletrack/logging roads. Great ride with everything.
    I take it you mean heading north, under the highway and then just don`t cross the bridge? I never noticed any offshoots around there, but I can see the ranches in that big meadow soon after. Always figured they were accessed from somewhere off 44.

    EDIT: Probably won`tbe back there this summer, but we usually try for a run up that way when the leaves turn.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Good stuff. And your bikes always make me want to try dropbars, darnnit.
    They have a place, and it's cool for a change sometimes, but my MTB will always have a flat or riser bar on it. I still contend that the 'alt' bar thing is not for me. But the commuter/tourer/occasional off road bomber bike is seriously fun with drops.


    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I take it you mean heading north, under the highway and then just don`t cross the bridge? I never noticed any offshoots around there, but I can see the ranches in that big meadow soon after. Always figured they were accessed from somewhere off 44.

    EDIT: Probably won`tbe back there this summer, but we usually try for a run up that way when the leaves turn.
    Yes, just before that bridge, hang a right up the 'old highway'..there's still some old pavement on the first part...that ties into logging roads, which can get you all the way back (cross 44, cross the lake road), but there's some old singletrack up in there off of the logging roads that leads its way back also.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  60. #60
    weirdo
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    I`ll have to try that area next time we go up there. Thanks for the tip!

  61. #61
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    Off topic again...

    CB, you've had the Ogre for awhile now. How about a comparison between it and the old Access?

  62. #62
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    The shorter wheelbase/chainstay length on the Ogre is really noticeable compared to the access. Even with the drop bars, I lift the front wheel on technical climbs when I'm not thinking about it... but the geometry of the Ogre is just awesome. I have the access as my singlespeed now, and the other access as my 'normal' mountain bike. It's a difficult bike to "manual" over stuff...hard to keep the front wheel in the air when you want to, but really stable on climbs. I knew that the Ogre shares the same geometry with the tried-and-true Karate Monkey, but I don't think I really appreciated what that meant before I started riding it.
    It's taking some serious restraint to avoid swapping all of my MTB parts onto this frame, ditching the drop bars, and making it my full time mountian bike. I sort of can't wait to do that at some point. But it's so comfortable and good as the commuter/dirt bomber. And it has the dropouts and serious potential as an amazing singlespeed... Really, I need to ditch the Access frames and get a couple more Ogres...or just mark dates on the calendar and convert it from commuter to MTB to singlespeed at regular intervals, so I can get some time in on all of it's areas of potential.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  63. #63
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    Got my pair today, very well constructed. Can't wait to get them on some wheels and fell that big fat smooth bliss. Glad I won't be wasting my knobbies for no reason.
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Beware the saddle sniffer.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Currently rolling on $10 Kenda Kwests (35c) that I had on an old bike...I feel like I'm on borrowed time with them...
    I just put 5000 miles on a set of $10 35c Kenda Kwests, and they probably could have another few thousand miles in them, but I had a new set sitting there, this time the $15 35c Kenda Kwests with "KShield" flat protection (whatever that means). I rarely get flats with it, and to justify spending 4 times as much on a better tire, it will need to last 4 times as far - 20,000 miles, for it to be worth it.... or maybe 15,000 miles with better performance.

  65. #65
    Unhinged Aussie on a 29er
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    Quote Originally Posted by campredcloudbikes View Post
    I just put 5000 miles on a set of $10 35c Kenda Kwests, and they probably could have another few thousand miles in them, but I had a new set sitting there, this time the $15 35c Kenda Kwests with "KShield" flat protection (whatever that means). I rarely get flats with it, and to justify spending 4 times as much on a better tire, it will need to last 4 times as far - 20,000 miles, for it to be worth it.... or maybe 15,000 miles with better performance.
    The price difference is a pretty good case for the Serfas Drifters over BA's. I've got some Big Apples ($50'ish), some Marathon Supreme's ($80'ish) and some Drifters ($30'ish) that I'll try and see how they all go, and how many miles I can get out of each one. I'm going to run them all during the wet season, but I think during summer at least I'll throw on the Drifters and leave them on, simply because they are more suitable for my summertime riding.

    I wish I could say I've had a lot of success for the Kenda Kwest tires, but they've been the only tire that has consistently failed on me at 2000 mi. I went through 6 before giving up in a smaller size. Which is weird, because Kenda have a reputation for making fantastic tires. I did buy 4 at once, so it is possible it was a batch issue.

  66. #66
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    Got my drifters mounted to my Hope Hoops, but didn't ride them much as I was anxious to try my Hadley wheelset.

    So far all I can say is that it's really weird have that big of a smooth tire on a bike I've always ran knobbies on. Not bad, but definitely different. They seemed to roll well. I'll get some miles on them in the next week.


    They definitely make some odd squishy/bubbly sounds in the wet. But they do seem to be gripping well.
    Last edited by Trees138; 09-03-2012 at 10:30 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Beware the saddle sniffer.

  67. #67
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    My Kenda's aren't too old... I'll keep them on standby for spare use in the future.

    I added air to the tubeless Drifters this weekend... after 1 week of tubeless use, without adding any air at all after initial set-up (which is unheard of for 'ghetto' tubeless), the front lost 5 psi and the rear lost 4 psi.

    Definitely the best results I've had with any tire at all in terms of tubeless. There is still no seepage on the sidewalls after a week of use. I'm getting a tiny bit of seepage at the bead (this is normal), but obviously no air loss, so no worres.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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