Which of these would you pick?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Which of these would you pick?

    I would like to revisit my new commuter choice. Some things were discovered, I want to go with a particular brand. So which would you pick? My commute consists of sidewalk, slightly broken up or cracked in areas; I also go over some loose gravel/packed dirt. But I assume both frames and wheels can handle that. The issue would be the tires on option 1, which I think (correct me if I'm wrong) would have to be replaced right off the bat. Option 1 seems to have better components, and is lighter (+$180); but option 2 seems ready for my commute as is.
    Thank you for you insight and expertise.

    Option 1

    Alta Velocità corsa Alu 6061
    Fork: cr-mo TIG 1”-1/8 Integrated
    Gear: Shimano 2200
    Front derailleur: Shimano 2200
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano ST EF60 24V
    Chainwheel: BTC alu TS 52-42-30
    B.B. set: VP cartuccia sealed B.B
    Brakes: BTC alu racing
    Wheels: Bottecchia BTC Racing
    Tyres: CST 700x23
    Handlebar: BTC alu rised
    Stem: alu ahead adjustable
    Seat post: BTC alu
    Saddle: Royal Viper with bag
    Pedals: Road alu
    Sizes: 48 - 51 - 54 - 57 sloping
    Colours: dark chrome
    Weight: Kg. 11,000


    Option 2

    Frame: Alu hydrosculpture
    Fork: Steel integrated
    Gear: Shimano Acera
    Front derailleur: Shimano TZ
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano ST EF60 21V
    Freewheel: Shimano TZ 077
    Chainwheel: BTC alu TS 110 52-42-30
    B.B. set: VP cartuccia sealed B.B.
    Brakes: Alu BTC
    Tyres: TRK 700x35
    Hubs: w/front+rear q.r. black
    Handlebar: Alu BTC over hydrosculpture rised
    Stem: Alu BTC regolabile adjustable ahead set
    Seat post: Alu BTC
    Saddle: Royal Freccia
    Pedals: TRK alu
    Sizes: 48 - 52 - 56 c-f / m-e man
    Colours: silver satin
    Weight: Kg. 12,400
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    2008 Specialized Hardrock Sport
    2010 Bottecchia RS290 Cross

  2. #2
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    Pics.
    Thanks again!!!
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  3. #3
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I'd want your hardrock. Never heard of the two options...

  4. #4
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    never heard of them either...

  5. #5
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    Its an Italian brand, been around for some time. My hope is that someone more knowledgeable than I, could offer some insight based on the details provided.
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  6. #6
    viva la v-brakes!
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    the second bike comes with a rack and a light and looks like it has room for fenders, so that gets my vote.
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  7. #7
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    Yeah, I do like how the second is ready to go; but I do already have a rack. And I will need lights if I plan on commuting into the winter. Which is why I'm stuck b/n the 2. One seems slightly more equipped, but the other seems better overall. Option 2 seems to have similar components to my Hardrock, which are fine but nothing special (unless I'm misjudging things).
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  8. #8
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    From the conditions you described, it seems like your Hardrock is already the best option for your commute.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  9. #9
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    Hardrock does the job, but its a bit heavy and I'd like to go with a rigid. Plus I want to turn the Hardrock back into a trail bike; I hate having to swap the tires back and forth, as well as taking the rack off/putting it on.
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  10. #10
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    I'd Go Option 1

    23mm are plenty for what you describe. Sidewalk, gravel, light trails...no problem.

    I learned to ride off road on a road race bike with 700x23 tires and rode trails with them that people now days seem to think full suspension is manditory for.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne
    23mm are plenty for what you describe. Sidewalk, gravel, light trails...no problem.

    I learned to ride off road on a road race bike with 700x23 tires and rode trails with them that people now days seem to think full suspension is manditory for.
    Is this an overall consensus? 23 is straight up road bike, isnt it? Seems like I'd be begging for flats, and I dont think the frame would be happy either.
    But, again, I'm not sure; which is why I'm asking.
    Thanks!!
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  12. #12
    viva la v-brakes!
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    23c is too skinny for commuting. You want something bigger and tougher that will be more resistant to puncture flats and less likely to pinch flat if you let the tire pressure get too low. Also, a commuting bike should have fenders, and the permanent, full-coverage fenders work better as they provide more protection and are more durable.

    Bike #1 is just a toy, bike #2 is a tool for commuting.

    That said, I agree with the above people: put a rigid fork on your HardRock and turn it into your commuter and then spend your $$ on a nice new MTB. We're getting close to the end of the off-road riding season here anyway so you could just save up your pennies until spring for the new MTB.
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  13. #13
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    Fenders were never really a concern since I dont ride in the rain. Plus, I'm set on getting a Bottecchia. I found out that I'm a relative of who the bike is named after (2 time Tour de France winner).
    I have a way to get to a nice bike path, but I still need to ride some sidewalk to get there. I like option 1 better, but I think option 2 is better equipped for commuting and carrying my gear.
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  14. #14
    viva la v-brakes!
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    If you only ride on dry days, you must not do much committing. You've never gone to work on a nice sunny day only to have it turn rainy and wet later?

    Yeah, my best friend and riding buddy from high school's last name is Felt. Surely only Felt brand bicycles are right for me. Everyone here is recommending either your Hard Rock or "option 2". Why ask for advice if you're going to ignore it? If you really like bike #1 then just get it and quit trying to justify it to yourself.

    Good luck with that.
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  15. #15
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    The Frame Wont Care

    Your body might care depending on what you're used to.

    I don't see how tire size relates to flats. If you're purpously hitting rock gardens or searching out piles of broken glass in the street then maybe you need something heavy duty but I have no problem with flats commuting 45 miles a day on 20-23mm tires.
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  16. #16
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    For the most part, rain is pretty scattered around here so I've never been caught in a downpour. The times I've been caught out in the rain, I've dealt with it and havent had issues.
    You're saying that if you had a relative who won the Tour and had a brand of bike named after him; you wouldnt want to own that brand of bike, thats fine. But for me, adding that bit of family history to something I already love, is a no-brainer.
    I never said that I'm disregarding people's advice. I'm still between the 2, all I said is that I prefer option 1; buts its not necessarily the best for the job. So I'm caught between what I feel is an overall better bike and one that may be more functional.
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  17. #17
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by 08HardRock
    Hardrock does the job, but its a bit heavy and I'd like to go with a rigid. Plus I want to turn the Hardrock back into a trail bike; I hate having to swap the tires back and forth, as well as taking the rack off/putting it on.
    Quite understandable.

    If you get a bike that comes with 23mm tires, it`s a good idea to make sure there`s room for a little more rubber in case you don`t like the 23s. If you can swap in a pair of 32s, it could very well be the difference between loving hte bike and not wanting anything to do with it. You`ll probably be able to do that on a hybrid, but that isn`t the case on a lot of road bikes- worth checking into.
    Recalculating....

  18. #18
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    Lets say I throw the rack of option 1 (which I already own), put on some 700x28 tires (which I assume will fit and be appropriate for commuting), i.e. level the playing field as far as accessories. Is option 1 an overall better bike? I'm not too familiar with option 1's components as I believe they are for road bikes. Plus, I'm having a hard time researching the bikes overall, since they are european.
    Thanks again, fellas!!
    Last edited by 08HardRock; 10-15-2009 at 12:49 PM.
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  19. #19
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    I'd skip buying a commuter and get a better mountain bike instead...
    ...oh, and real commuters don't ride sidewalks.

  20. #20
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    This commuter rides on sidewalks. Not worth hoping that the guy riding in a 3000lb projectile at 50mph is paying attention. Whether I'm riding in the street or on the sidewalk, I'm still commuting by bike instead of by car; so I dont really care what real commuters do.
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  21. #21
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by 08HardRock
    This commuter rides on sidewalks. Not worth hoping that the guy riding in a 3000lb projectile at 50mph is paying attention. Whether I'm riding in the street or on the sidewalk, I'm still commuting by bike instead of by car; so I dont really care what real commuters do.


    Well, the first one appears to be missing half the spokes. I have no idea what BTC racing wheels are, so maybe they`re up to rolling you over broken pavement with skinny little tires, but I wouldn`t hold my breath. And it weighs in pretty light for a relatively low end bike- makes me wonder what kind of diet it was put on. I don`t think I`d want it.

    The second one has black hubs. I guess they can fit more spoke holes in a black hub than in a BTC Racing hub. You also know for a fact that there`s room for tires bigger than 23mm. I suppose that would get my vote if for no other reason than it has spokes and it fits more comfy tires if needed.
    Recalculating....

  22. #22
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    Thank you very much.
    When you say "relatively low end"; is this based on the specs? Seems to be about 24lbs, that doesnt seem unreasonably light to me; am I mistaken?
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  23. #23
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    It might be a fine bike. The drivetrain group isn't high end. Shimano's Alivios aren't lusted after.

    I wouldn't worry about the bike. You are set on the bikes, they are what they are, and you ride how you ride. I'm sure it'll work out just the way you would want.

  24. #24
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 08HardRock
    This commuter rides on sidewalks. Not worth hoping that the guy riding in a 3000lb projectile at 50mph is paying attention. Whether I'm riding in the street or on the sidewalk, I'm still commuting by bike instead of by car; so I dont really care what real commuters do.
    It is legal in some areas and sometimes it's the safest way to go. I've been known to hop a curb or two, now and then to get away from someone who obviously isn't paying attention, or get through an intersection that has a high accident rate.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  25. #25
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by 08HardRock
    Thank you very much.
    When you say "relatively low end"; is this based on the specs? Seems to be about 24lbs, that doesnt seem unreasonably light to me; am I mistaken?
    Yes.
    No. I guess it isn`t out of line compared to "modern" bikes- it`s just lighter than my bikes. A lot lighter than my commuter and worlds lighter than my previous commuter. I still wouldn`t feel secure on low spoke count wheels. The second one really doesn`t say anything useful about the wheels, but at least I can see from the pic that they have plenty of spokes.
    Recalculating....

  26. #26
    weirdo
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    For what it`s worth...

    there`s no shortage of low end on my bikes. I absolutely love my $120 Sugino crankset, my daily rider sports 15 year old Exage derailers (low end 15 years ago) that still work flawlessly, and I finally replaced the old STX rear derailler on our tandem- not for function, but because I want that shiny three pound hunk of polished aluminum hanging off my double butted Ishiwata road frame.
    Recalculating....

  27. #27
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    Thanks again, all!
    Yeah, I looked up my county's regulations for using sidewalks before I started commuting; and it is legal here.

    I dont really have too much issue with "lower end" specs. I figure these bikes are roughly on par with $400-$500 Treks/similar brands; which I find to be reasonable. I figure if I decide to go with the cheaper one, I could always wait until the stuff starts to wear and maybe upgrade to Deore with the money I saved. Really I'm probably only missing out on the lighter frame/crmo fork. But with what you said, maybe having a little bulk isnt a bad thing. Plus, I think the 27lbs (option 2) is still lighter than my HR, which I believe is low 30s.
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  28. #28
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    Now that I think about it, would I have a problem upgrading since it appears that option 2 is 7-speed; arent most modern parts 8/9-speed compatible?
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  29. #29
    weirdo
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    Yeah, most rear hubs now are 8-9-10 compatible, but some are still being made for threaded freewheels. As far as I know, no more freehubs are being built for seven speed or less cassettes.

    Seven speeds is an issue, but not a major one. There are still a fairly good suply of 7-s freewheels and cassettes available, though nowhere near the variety of 8 and 9 speed. If it`s a threaded hub, there are boatloads of used freewheels (5 through 7 all screw onto the same hubs) and a fair to middlin supply of new ones.

    Note: unless you have an option for friction shifting, you still need to match freewheel/cassette to your shifter.
    Recalculating....

  30. #30
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    So, if I wanted to upgrade the rear derailleur, for example, I would have to find something 7 speed compatible? Or is this primarily an issue when upgrading the freewheel/cassette? Pardon my ignorance, but I'm trying to learn to be able to do things on my own.
    Thanks again.
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  31. #31
    weirdo
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    You COULD put dang near any shimano long cage derailler on there and it would work. In fact, I`m pretty sure you could use any long cage Suntour RD as well (seven speed lets you get away with stuff some times). If you wanted to go from threaded to freehub or vise versa, you`d need a different hub. If you get one of those bikes, I don`t recomend any crazy upgrades, but it will likely do a good job for you anyway. Check out what Sheldon Brown had to say- it`ll clear up some of the mystery.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/speeds.html
    Recalculating....

  32. #32
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    Thank you very much! I dont see myself doing any crazy upgrades. Maybe just a derailleur upgrade; and replacing parts as they wear/break.
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