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  1. #1
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    Swapping tires vs 2nd wheelset

    To begin I'm an N=1 person. I picked up my salsa Fargo specifically for its versatility, so N+1 is not an option.

    With that, what is the preferred method for different terrain rides? I commute 26 miles rt several times a week which is done with 35mm vittoria tires that I really like. The weekend involves swapping to mtb tires for some canal bank exploration rides. Trouble I'm having is that goatheads have shortened the last couple weekend rides, and swapping tires back and forth is getting old.

    I'd like to build up a wheelset similar to the OEM set to avoid/minimize shifting/braking calibration issues, but obviously that's an added expense. I'd also be interested in trying tubeless for the trail rides which further necessitates a 2nd wheelset.

    So am I still better off swapping tires or would I benefit from 2 wheelsets?

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  2. #2
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    2 wheelsets is a no brainer. All my bikes use multiple wheelsets.
    There is initial expense but that is offset with the time saved swapping tires back and forth over the years.

    I don't know about anyone else but I'm much more likely to ride if all I have to do is flip a skewer, drop a wheel out, then drop a new wheel in, tighten the skewer and go.
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  3. #3
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    I do it all the time..

    Three wheelsets knobs studs and slicks...

    Same brand of everything helps but is not necessary.

    For knobs go tubeless...

    I gave up on the street tires tubeless cause I just wear everything out.

  4. #4
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    I own 10 bikes, more of a right tool for the job kinda guy. 2 wheel sets, especially for tubeless. Seems like a pain though, wouldn't you rather just hop on the bike and ride?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    I own 10 bikes, more of a right tool for the job kinda guy. 2 wheel sets, especially for tubeless. Seems like a pain though, wouldn't you rather just hop on the bike and ride?
    In theory yes. But in my case mutiple bikes is almost like wasted money. The one(s) that don't get used for commuting would not get used enough to justify the expense. Then I would just see money hanging in the garage that could be used elsewhere. The same even applies for a 2nd wheelset. I'm not sure I'd use it enough to justify the cost, but it's cheaper than having multiple bikes.

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  6. #6
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    Cost? Nothing costs more than just sitting on the couch, health stuff, etc. I'm a fan of do what makes you happy. She also likes my sculpted legs. My Karate Monkey is my do all commuter, foul weather, dirt commuter and touring. My cross check is my good weather commuter. How much gas do I save by commuting 2,000 miles per year? Miles per smiles? Two commuters are just for winter, ie have studded tires on them all year. Fat bike, tourer, full sus, 1x1 etc. I drive a 1999 corolla. Everyone has different priorities. What is your time worth? Time pedaling or futzing with wheels? Get a used commuter for $500 vs a wheel set for$3-500? One more thought. Use one set of tires. The Karate Monkey has wide rims and 29 x 2.3 sort of slicks. Great for commuting, good for all dirt except for mud. And really tough single track. Food for thought. Bikes make me happy. Never bought one and said, gee, it's just $ sitting there.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Never bought one and said, gee, it's just $ sitting there.
    I get ya, there are several bikes I'd like to have. But my accounting brain looks at the opportunity cost and utility of nearly everything and I'd inevitably see money just sitting there. Especially when 90% of my miles are commuting on one bike.

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  8. #8
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    Ok, so second bike sees 30-40 days ? of use, longer lifespan, 10-15 years. Price it out as 22 cents( or whatever the number is) per day. Now cringe every time you get a $4.00 cup of coffee, knowing that is like 2 weeks of bike ownership? Do you not drink good beer, dine out or good bourbon? I tend not to be that critical when it comes to spending money on bikes. Photographer here. Artist type. I do tend to buy mid level and hold onto them.

  9. #9
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    Just get the 2nd wheel set. I find that the desire to change out tires declines significantly every time it has to be done. Then I just got a 2nd bike to use as a commuter, but I ended up turning it into a single/fixed gear and now my mountain bike is my primary commuter again and I am just too lazy to change tires on it.

    Maybe that's a personal problem, though...
    dang

  10. #10
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    I've thought about it in the past and ended up just getting a 'B' bike for that job. It's more that I don't want to mess around any more than I have to to go ride.

    Could you choose a tire you're happy with for both? A tread will still last a pretty long time on the front and the gravel thing means there are a slew of options with dense, file or raised center treads, that should give you reasonable performance and life as rear tires.

    I can swap tubeless tires at home, but it's definitely messier and more complicated than tubed tires. I still think summer and winter sets make sense but wouldn't want to do it twice a week.

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post

    Could you choose a tire you're happy with for both?

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    I suppose it's possible, but I'm looking for semi slick/gravel tire for the weekend rides and with 75-100 miles of commute per week I'd go thru them too fast. I'm pretty sure I'm going with a 2nd wheelset at some point.



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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbandt View Post
    I suppose it's possible, but I'm looking for semi slick/gravel tire for the weekend rides and with 75-100 miles of commute per week I'd go thru them too fast. I'm pretty sure I'm going with a 2nd wheelset at some point.



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    I use the geax tattoo in 29 x 2.3, sort of like a hookworm tread pattern.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbandt View Post
    I get ya, there are several bikes I'd like to have. But my accounting brain looks at the opportunity cost and utility of nearly everything and I'd inevitably see money just sitting there. Especially when 90% of my miles are commuting on one bike.

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    Seriously? Sounds like you just need to chill out and get away from work for a second.

    A great many of my annual miles this year are commute miles, too. Doesn't mean that I don't value a good bike for my mtb rides, too.

    I'd have no qualms about having multiple wheelsets for each bike, but I also wouldn't want to be swapping back and forth multiple times per week, either.

    Now, if you had legitimate storage space concerns and were simply unable to fit a second bike into your available space, that's one thing. But saying you can't buy a second bike because you would over analyze things? Give me a break.

  14. #14
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    <-- doesn't want to think about how many of his bikes are currently seeing very low mileage.

    But, I got a lot of joy from each of them during their moments, and hope to do more, and more varied riding again in future.

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  15. #15
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    Your commute is long enough that maybe you should treat yourself to a new, lighter commuting wheelset and use the old wheels for your other rides.

    I've had to ride my carbon rimmed (and framed) road bike on my 35 mile round trip commute for a few days due to cracking the spindle on my Vaya commuter. Other than it being uncomfortable with a backpack it's noticeably easier and like 10 min faster for less effort.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    I own 10 bikes, more of a right tool for the job kinda guy. 2 wheel sets, especially for tubeless. Seems like a pain though, wouldn't you rather just hop on the bike and ride?
    No you don't you have to maintain 10 bikes....

    And you had to buy ten bikes, and you have to store ten bikes.

    I have had three bikes a 1990 Norco rigid MTB, 2005 Rocky Element, 2017 Santa Cruz Tallboy.

    First time I have ever ridden two bikes, the Rocky for the commute and the Tallboy for MTB....

    No different than swapping tires....except cost, storage, and maintaince.

    I bought the Tallboy cause the Rocky is on its last legs for MTB but can still commute for a few more years, before the pitting in the frame kills it.

    Norco is set up for deep snow commutes, but I will set the Tallboy up for that job now.

    So I guess yes I have three bikes and use them all, however little.

    Swapping Tires is cheaper and easier though.

  17. #17
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    I hate mounting tires and would go for two wheel sets. I've never done two wheel sets, I'm assuming you also need two cassettes. Can this cause problems with one wearing in with the chain and chainrings and then the second one not running so well, especially if you have been running one set for awhile already?

    I have six bikes (actually more but I'm not counting my folder). I don't really think they are more maintenance than one as my riding is split between six bikes so less wear and tear per bike. I have a basement so storage isn't much of an issue. I've thought about would I be better off with one or two bikes but each of the six is different (full sus 29/hardtail 26/ss 26/road/cyclocross/fixed-free) and I enjoy them all. I have been thinking of getting a second wheel set for the CX, if I do, I could probably let go of the road bike. But most of my bikes are older and worth more to me than the cash I could get for them.

    I'm with Harold and some of the others, if you are riding the bikes, they are not money just sitting there.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I hate mounting tires and would go for two wheel sets. I've never done two wheel sets, I'm assuming you also need two cassettes. Can this cause problems with one wearing in with the chain and chainrings and then the second one not running so well, especially if you have been running one set for awhile already?

    I have six bikes (actually more but I'm not counting my folder). I don't really think they are more maintenance than one as my riding is split between six bikes so less wear and tear per bike. I have a basement so storage isn't much of an issue. I've thought about would I be better off with one or two bikes but each of the six is different (full sus 29/hardtail 26/ss 26/road/cyclocross/fixed-free) and I enjoy them all. I have been thinking of getting a second wheel set for the CX, if I do, I could probably let go of the road bike. But most of my bikes are older and worth more to me than the cash I could get for them.

    I'm with Harold and some of the others, if you are riding the bikes, they are not money just sitting there.
    Yes each one typical needs a cassette....yes at the extremes of wear some skipping may occur.....the fix is rotate your cassettes to even wear as required. Really not an issue for at leas a year or so wear At 3 to 4000 km per year.

    Yup money not working is money just sitting there.

    Yup I carry some spare parts to make sure I can always ride....and ride any set-up or bike.

    Storage also costs money....even if it is just spare basement.

    A glance at the list seems to show that you could definitely drop a couple and still have all the various rides....

    If you want SS just don't shift. viola saved a bike.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post

    Yup money not working is money just sitting there.
    This!! I know that if I had multiple bikes, even just two, the one that isn't used for commuting wouldn't get used enough to justify the cost. But that's me, I'm sure those with multiple bikes change it up often and get them all out frequently.

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  20. #20
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    ^^^ Bingo, there is your solution. Shoot or sell the car. Get 2 more bikes. Easy. Marvel at your improved fitness and the ability to consume large amounts of food.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    ^^^ Bingo, there is your solution. Shoot or sell the car. Get 2 more bikes. Easy. Marvel at your improved fitness and the ability to consume large amounts of food.
    Yup sell the car don't get the bikes and make your money work for you.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbandt View Post
    This!! I know that if I had multiple bikes, even just two, the one that isn't used for commuting wouldn't get used enough to justify the cost. But that's me, I'm sure those with multiple bikes change it up often and get them all out frequently.

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    For me, the weekend rides I do for myself are justification enough for a bike that's devoted to having fun on those rides. I don't miss many weekend days, so about a hundred rides a year over multiple years - lots of rides to amortize that cost. I think maintenance is pretty much a wash.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    For me, the weekend rides I do for myself are justification enough for a bike that's devoted to having fun on those rides. I don't miss many weekend days, so about a hundred rides a year over multiple years - lots of rides to amortize that cost. I think maintenance is pretty much a wash.

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    With that much use, I agree. I know how I am and it'd be more like 2 dozen rides a year, Maybe less with all the golfing I tend to do on the weekends. LOL!

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post

    If you want SS just don't shift. viola saved a bike.
    HOW DARE YOU!!!

    Yeah, I could just ride my full suspension in all situations but cycling is my #1 hobby. Some of them, like my Gunnar Street Dog, I bought as a cheap used frame and then collected the parts and built them up, another aspect of my hobby. I did sell my tri bike at the beginning of the summer 'cause I rode it so infrequently. That's when I picked up the CX bike. It is more useful as I can ride two miles to some trails and then ride out the other side on the road.

    I don't have a lot of money tied up in my bikes, probably a lot less than you have tied up in your car (I drive a 10 year old Subaru, paid cash for it several years ago).
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbandt View Post
    With that much use, I agree. I know how I am and it'd be more like 2 dozen rides a year, Maybe less with all the golfing I tend to do on the weekends. LOL!

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    I'd been wondering. I think the other posters and I were imagining you swapping tires or wheels twice a week, week in and week out. So I can see why you don't want to throw a ton of money at the off-road aspect of your riding or compromise on your day-to-day tires.

    If I'm going out and buying wheels and I'm not in a tight financial spot, I go for a $300-$600 set. It depends on whether what I want is available from a high volume seller or if I have to piece it together from components. That's before tires, brake rotors and a cassette.

    Did you say what bike you're riding? What standards for the tires, axles and brakes?

    One thing to think about would be an upgrade for your daily commute and using your existing wheels for your more occasional weekend rides. Depending on the answers to my questions, you might even be able to do something a little funky and extra cool.

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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I'd been wondering. I think the other posters and I were imagining you swapping tires or wheels twice a week, week in and week out. So I can see why you don't want to throw a ton of money at the off-road aspect of your riding or compromise on your day-to-day tires.

    If I'm going out and buying wheels and I'm not in a tight financial spot, I go for a $300-$600 set. It depends on whether what I want is available from a high volume seller or if I have to piece it together from components. That's before tires, brake rotors and a cassette.

    Did you say what bike you're riding? What standards for the tires, axles and brakes?

    One thing to think about would be an upgrade for your daily commute and using your existing wheels for your more occasional weekend rides. Depending on the answers to my questions, you might even be able to do something a little funky and extra cool.

    Sent from my E5803 using Tapatalk
    Salsa fargo. OEM set is sram 506 hubs, wtb sx i19 rims with bb7 rotors and a 10 speed cassette. I've pieced out a similar setup with wtb frequency rims on Amazon and just the components are pushing $450. Not sure if it's a good deal or if that's normal. Not sure what assembly will cost. Tires are another 100, but I won't get those just yet.

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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbandt View Post
    With that much use, I agree. I know how I am and it'd be more like 2 dozen rides a year, Maybe less with all the golfing I tend to do on the weekends. LOL!

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    I presumed this was a once or twice a week thing. So, at that rate, change them once a month and change them back afterwards. No biggie.
    dang

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbandt View Post
    Salsa fargo. OEM set is sram 506 hubs, wtb sx i19 rims with bb7 rotors and a 10 speed cassette. I've pieced out a similar setup with wtb frequency rims on Amazon and just the components are pushing $450. Not sure if it's a good deal or if that's normal. Not sure what assembly will cost. Tires are another 100, but I won't get those just yet.

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    One of these days I'll get to ride one. Certainly a curiosity-inducing bike.

    The SRAM hubs are pretty much all OEM hubs. Nothing wrong with them, though. The SX is an OEM rim; nothing really wrong with it either. Those Amazon prices don't sound like a terribly good deal - close to MSRP, I'd think. Expect assembly to cost $60/wheel or several hours of your time. I've built a couple wheels. It's satisfying but for those of us who only build a wheel or a set every few years, it's pretty time consuming. There's a couple special tools involved, though I haven't found that to be a huge barrier - either plan ahead a little or work around them.

    So I really enjoy 23 mm road tires. I love the acceleration and handling. And the normal run of racing/training tires are actually pretty durable. I don't think it's what they meant with the name, but people can get 4000 miles out of the Continental Grand Prix 4000.

    A straight-up road tire is a lot shorter than what your bike's around, so it would lower your bottom bracket and reduce your trail. I don't know if it would be unacceptable.

    I had a good time going to work on my racing bike the summer that made sense. Otherwise, I've typically commuted 25 or 28 mm tires depending on the bike, whether I was using a rack, what my friends were dumping, etc. Not usually that long a commute, but I enjoyed longish road rides on the weekend before I moved to where I am now, with kickass trails a few minutes' ride away.

    If you haven't tried a skinny-tired road bike or its been a while, hop on one and see what you think. Don't be afraid to play with tire pressure. In a 23 mm tire I like 80 psi front/95 rear.

    If that bike doesn't convert you to the dark side, you've got a little thinking about tires to do. I could see using anything from a 23 mm to a 2.4 in slick to commute on a Fargo on asphalt. What you want is going to determine your rim width. When I bought new wheels for my XC bike, I chose DT 350 hubs, but I won't be hurt if you just want to stick with SRAMs. You might also buy complete wheels. I doubt you're doing anything so unusual that the right rim doesn't come as part of a stock wheel.



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