• 07-17-2014
    Shavednslow
    Suggestions for MTB with rack and fender mounts, possibly old school?
    Hi all (I'm still sort of a FNG here).

    So, looks like my Trek 6500 that has morphed into my around town bike over fifteen years has developed a crack, which is too bad because I like everything about it except for the lack of fender mounts in the rear triangle.

    So I'm looking for a frame that 1) has similar geometry b) has rack and fender mounts and c) isn't too heavy. Older / used would be great to keep price down and it seems like a lot of them have the mounting points. Something like the Trek 800, but probably lighter. (I'm really not getting too hung up on town bike weight, but I don't want to go too far in the other direction.)

    Any suggestions on older MTB models that fit the bill? Or, alternatively, new hybrid-ish types? I'm trying to stick with 26" MTB since I have all the parts and many are new...

    Thanks
  • 07-17-2014
    mtbxplorer
    Yes, you're right, the early mountain bikes were more likely to have a lot of mounts like my mid 1980's Ritchey Outback, back when they thought they'd be used in the backcountry, before racing took over. They also had rigid forks, which is good for many commuters, particularly compared to a cr*ppy old suspension fork. But it was not a lightweight. Those oldsters are tough to find in good condition. If I were in your shoes, rather than fix on a certain age, make or model, I would browse the classifieds, Craigslist, yard sales, bike swaps etc. for good candidates. To protect yourself from low end overpriced models, google the make/model to get an idea of the MSRP and/or going prices. If you're not sure about judging the condition of a used ride, or fixing things, somewhere that fixes and resells used bikes might be worth a look.
  • 07-18-2014
    fishsonger
    Interesting, I ride a Trek 800 everyday - just about 25 miles a day, actually - and I love the bike. One of the main reasons I like it so much is that I can put racks and fenders, etc. on it. I've been spoiled by it. But, it's getting old and I've begun looking for a replacement, which as you know, is challenging. I'd be interested to know if you agree, but it looks to me like the Surly Ogre would be a great replacement. Like you, I haven't found any mountain rigs that will haul like the old Antelope, but I think the Ogre might do it. Of course, finding one has really been a challenge. In the DC area, where I ride, no one carries it, so a test ride's out.
  • 07-18-2014
    mtbxplorer
    CommuterBoy uses one and seems to love it. He's on summer break, so he may not chime in, but you could search for some of his posts with "Ogre" in it to see pix and commentary.
  • 07-18-2014
    Shavednslow
    Forgot which is which, but I think the Orge is the 29er and the Troll is 26?

    Realize I probably should have worded my post differently, more like
    "Higher-end old MTBs - what are good old-skool steel MTBs?" As I cruise craigslist looking for frames I'm not sure what I should keep an eye out for, like Stumpjumpers are generally higher end than Rockhoppers, Trek 850 versus 800 (maybe?), I don't know anything about Giant / Diamond Back at the time.

    Basically looking for double-butted, well made steel. Again, not getting too wired about weight, but budget straight tube steel from any era can really be a tank....
  • 08-31-2014
    RoyFokker
    If it has a crack in the frame, I would take it to a local Trek dealer and/or also email Trek directly a photo of the crack. Trek has a lifetime warranty on frames:
    Trek Care Limited Warranty - We've got you covered - Trek Bicycle
    If it damage from a crash, though, that is not covered. But others have reported even in such cases Trek has offered discounts on a new frame.

    Also I don't think it is a good idea to use a heavy mountain bike with suspension fork as an around town bike. If you replace it look for something like cyclocross bike that has at least rear-rack braze-ons or a touring bike.
  • 08-31-2014
    rockhopper97
    1 Attachment(s)
    nothing wrong with a rockhopper, I would stay away from a hard rock.... I picked up my rockhopper at a garage sale for $5 and used parts from another bike to put it together... it is a light bike ....mine is a 97 model and it has rack mounts on it.... it is a well built chrome moly frameAttachment 919849

    all the accessories I already had
  • 09-01-2014
    cdoesthehula
    Don't go too high end! Really light frames will be much more delicate than middle-quality ones.

    Giant made some great steel frames in DB cromoly, and they aren't really collectable. The Track and Sierra Sport are both great bikes from 1990ish, and they have mounts for front and rear racks.

    Other than that Trek made some fine frames. An 800 is an OK bike, a bit heavy, but you won't notice once you're going. Once you fit a pair of D-locks to a bike, lightweight is pretty immaterial really.
  • 09-03-2014
    cassa89
    I have a 95 Hard Rock that I've put too much money into and it's had one issue after another. BB needed replacing, then brakes, now worn teeth are making shifting an issue (delays and clanking). In hind site, I wish I'd just purchased a low-end MTN bike that would have served my commuting purpose.
  • 09-03-2014
    Shavednslow
    Hey, thanks for the replies all. My frame sure sounds like it's cracked (clicking/creaking when hitting bumps), but so far nothing is showing so it's annoying but not warranty-able.

    It's true that people are basically making the bike I want, basically a strong flat bar road bike with lots of accessory mounts, but I like the old MTB for the geometry, price, and general ruggedness. And style - would love to find a neon splatter paint job, but that probably pre-dates the 90's
  • 09-03-2014
    RoyFokker
    On an alumunium or steel frame if it isn't visibly cracked, it is isn't cracked. You have to isolate or locate where the sound is coming from better.