Storing your bike at work- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Storing your bike at work

    When I rode my bike (Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc with many, I mean many upgrades), I used to store it upstairs in the office. I work at a LTL trucking company, the first level is the dock, with forklifts, dust, etc. I put it upstairs because it is out of the way and out of sight from the guys who work on the dock, who I don't trust. I don't want it outside for the same reasons. I was happy with putting it upstairs in the office part, closed office some days.

    Now we just got a new terminal manager who said I cannot put it upstairs in the office anymore. I told him I am not leaving it outside, I do not trust people. There is a small room in the dispatch office on the first level, but there is 40-50 drivers in and out of the room all day, also has no room for a bike.

    So what do I do? Do I buy a bike I do not care about and chain it up outside? Do I not ride to work? Do I ride my RH and just chain it up outside?

    Thanks!

    Mike

  2. #2
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Sorry man, that really sucks! I had the same issue at one job where the only place to keep my bike was in the warehouse. After a great deal of reluctance, I finally parked my bike there only to find it knocked over and scraped up at the end of the day. I recommend you try to explain your situation to your manager and if that fails, build a beater that you feel comfortable leaving out all day. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    If 100-200 can land you a reliable, fun commuter, I'd do that. I almost always commute on inexpensive bikes with visible rust and lots of stickers. If someone jacks it... I'll only be emotionally distraught and not financially boned.

    Sorry, cause that situation sucks.

  4. #4
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    I worked in several warehouse/factory situations putting myself through college. I know exactly the sort of mischief some 'workers' can get up to. You are not over reacting.

    I understand the manager not wanting a bike impeding traffic in his office, or if more ride, it being a precedent for even more bikes, or if he is a neatness freak, especially if you don't actually work in the office. The office is the office, not a bike storage facillity. He obviously doesn't get commuting by bike or he'd have had you come up with a workable solution he could OK. or had one himself when he asked you to remove the bike.

    If only you and the manager know the bike is to move out of the office, is there a place just outside/beside/behind the office out of sight (maybe with a tarp), so that workers think it is still in the office? Alternatively, is there a view out of the office for someone (especially if they are nice or like you), where the bike is out of the way but never out of sight? Is there a security station or entry guardhouse you could lock it up behind? Is there a security camera with a recorder overlooking a suitable spot (better than no surveillance at all)?

    Tampering with your bike IS a safety issue for you, and riding it keeps you healthy, so if you are a good employee, and they are trying to keep health care costs down, then safe storage of your bike is in the managements's best interests, too. Management usually responds best when you have one or more good (especially cost-free) solutions to offer. But some managers need to put lowly 'workers' in their place. Or dismiss any suggestions because of the source. So, bear in mind that getting forgiven is often easier than getting permission with difficult managers. If your specific order is to remove it from the office and not from that floor, you may be able to relocate it near the office out of sight and none are the wiser. Or to find another suitable location.

    Otherwise, you are forced to use a commuter bike that you can afford to have damaged.

    Good luck and safe riding.

    Brian.

  5. #5
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    I talked with the wife about buying a beater commuter, she still says I can only have one bike, wtf! I need to talk to the TM again. arg!

  6. #6
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    What other transportaion options do you have and what do they cost? Your spouse may respond better to a second bike if it looks to be the least expensive option, rather than just another bike. The cost of losing a wheel off you current bike is likely more than the complete second bike.

    On the other hand, you were getting along well before, so maybe there is a safe way to park the bike.

    Good luck. BTW she is always right.
    Last edited by BrianMc; 09-05-2010 at 10:24 AM.

  7. #7
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    You may want to check into the handbook/corporate policy to see if they mentioned, at least, and at best are required to offer a safe area for transportation vehicles. Your bike falls into that category. I would say a large % of places offer reasonable parking facilities to ensure employee's vehicles are safe, secure, and under surveillance. If they cant guarantee your bike will be just that, its a problem.

    I agree with BrainMc, there needs to be cooperation on both sides to accommodate your mode of commute. Flip it the other way, if everyone rode bikes and one guy drove a car, he would expect the same amount of safety/security on his/her vehicle.

    Not saying be an Ass about it, but there has to be a happy medium.
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  8. #8
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    Get the best lock system you can, and secure the bike to the gas main that feeds the building. (j/k...barely)

    Seriously, though, since a bike is MUCH more vulnerable to theft than a car, the best locking system you can get is essential; without BEING in your particular environment, I can't offer much that's meaningful.

    The biggest redeeming feature of my employer is the fact that they have been amenable to my bringing the bike into the building for the last ten years, they understand that it IS my transportation, and as long as it's out of the way (it hangs from a hook ten feet off the floor, in a largely-unused corner of my work area) and I don't work on it on their time, it's cool.

    Talk to this manager, seek alternative ideas... can't hurt.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    I check with the TM Tuesday and let you know.

  10. #10
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    Well we agreed on a room near the mens room that they store some things in. No one goes in there very often, I am happy.

    Mike

  11. #11
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    I'd at the least get some type of U-lock or cable lock to lock rear/front wheel to the frame to keep anyone from riding it if you can't see the place where it's stored.

  12. #12
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    That's not a bad idea.

  13. #13
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by tracerprix
    I talked with the wife about buying a beater commuter, she still says I can only have one bike, wtf! I need to talk to the TM again. arg!
    Aw, man- talk about between a rock and a hard place! Management or management
    Well, I`m glad one of `em had a change of heart.
    Recalculating....

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by futurerocker1
    I'd at the least get some type of U-lock or cable lock to lock rear/front wheel .....
    Congratulations on the semi-secured but out-of sight-out-of-mind parking location.

    +1 on cable and Ulock. Preferably also cabled around something structural in the room, like a pipe. They should not be able to carry it off, locks and all without some time spent cutting locks or cable. You can get pretty hefty units and leave them in that room.

    Before it was parked in the office and so parts were unlikely to be removed without the theft being seen by someone. In a little used room, a quick in and out could net someone a five finger discount on a seat or light. So removal of easily swiped parts is also advised along with your helmet. If you have your own locking locker there, you are set, If not, a locked tool box fastened to a shelf, floor. or the wall, (it is a storage room, so who'd think it was your bike stuff?), might do the trick.

    If there is a primary person using this room as storage such as the custodian, it would be wise to consult with him/her on this change to the room and the best placement. It is best to be on their good side and a person who comes and goes randomly is an excellent deterrent to those with bad intent.

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