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  1. #1
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    steel or aluminum frame for durability

    My commuter is on its last legs, and it's about time to get a new one. I live in upstate NY and commute year-round. My current bike is steel and rusting out (the frame is over 20 years old). If I'm looking at long-term durability riding in all weather--snow, rain, you name it, is steel or aluminum going to hold up better? (Secret third and fourth options--CF and titanium--are out because of money.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbotron View Post
    My commuter is on its last legs, and it's about time to get a new one. I live in upstate NY and commute year-round. My current bike is steel and rusting out (the frame is over 20 years old). If I'm looking at long-term durability riding in all weather--snow, rain, you name it, is steel or aluminum going to hold up better? (Secret third and fourth options--CF and titanium--are out because of money.)
    Stainless steel? Not cheap tho.
    Funny how my steel x bike (not dtainless) i got recently cost almost as much as the carbon FS Yeti i just got!
    Spend a little, for something you use and enjoy for 20 years? Just think, $5 a week is over $5000!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    Stainless steel? Not cheap tho.
    Funny how my steel x bike (not dtainless) i got recently cost almost as much as the carbon FS Yeti i just got!
    Spend a little, for something you use and enjoy for 20 years? Just think, $5 a week is over $5000!
    True enough! But still--seems like I might have used that rationale on the last two bikes I built up. Probably can't get away with that again any time soon.

  4. #4
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    Nothing wrong with aluminum for a commuter. Frame life is the difference. I have been looking at CF bikes, but wanting a rack for me means wanting eyelets on the stays, and that limits my options to aluminum or steel. No one is making CF bikes to be used as commuters. As my LBS is a Specialized and Cannondale shop, that puts me in some specific bikes, though they've branched out into Salsa and Surly, so maybe...

  5. #5
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    If rigid, definitely steel unless your route is very smooth.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  6. #6
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    Steel is real.

  7. #7
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    Your bike would have cracked a long time ago if it was aluminum. Steel is a much more durable material.

  8. #8
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    My winter commuter, an aluminum 2008 Kona (now) rigid, is still going strong, although pretty much anything steel on it has been replaced, and often more than once. I don't take care of my winter commuter and the salt has eaten through everything but the frame.

    Maybe a steel frame would have lasted. Not sure, but I assume not.

    For the other 3 seasons - I commute on my steel fixed gear 2015 Kona Paddy Wagon.

    I love steel. My Paddy Wagon and my Honzo are among my favourite bikes I have ever owned. But I fear that steel would get killed in my climate in the winter, unless you are willing to wash it often (2x a week minimum).

    Maybe I am wrong...wish I was. I generally hate aluminum frames.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    If rigid, definitely steel unless your route is very smooth.
    + This

    Good point.
    Was going to say it really doesn't matter but the feel and ride of a rigid is "a thing" and it's a better thing on steel IMO.

    My forecast is YOU the commuter will be less fatigued on steel.
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  10. #10
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    Either material can be plenty durable if you buy a good quality bike. Winter commuters require more maintenance if you live in a snowy/salty climate.

    If you treat a steel frame internally when new with something like Fluid Film or Frame Saver it will last a long, long time. Using a carnauba car wax on the outside/paint will help shed dirt and salt. Rinsing the salt off and washing regularly will extent the life of the components.

    All of my winter bikes are steel. SS commuter, cross bike, fat bike. No rust.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I don't take care of my winter commuter and the salt has eaten through everything but the frame.
    This is problem with commuters, they get neglected and beat on.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Either material can be plenty durable if you buy a good quality bike. Winter commuters require more maintenance if you live in a snowy/salty climate.

    If you treat a steel frame internally when new with something like Fluid Film or Frame Saver it will last a long, long time. Using a carnauba car wax on the outside/paint will help shed dirt and salt. Rinsing the salt off and washing regularly will extent the life of the components.

    All of my winter bikes are steel. SS commuter, cross bike, fat bike. No rust.



    This is problem with commuters, they get neglected and beat on.
    Funny, Jenson USA just sent me an email featuring a stainless bike made with 60% recycled metal according to their blurb. Only $3 a week for that 20 year period!
    Aimed at whats all the rage now, “gravel” riding. Clearance for wide wheels, looks like its got rack mounts.
    Ive seen aluminum get chalky and oxidize, but it does resist better than steel. Watch out for any aluminum/steel interfaces tho. Be sure and use anti seize!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radium View Post
    Steel is real.
    Plastic is fantastic.
    Lol, actually i just got a steel cross as commuter, my pride & joy “vintage” mtb is steel. My trail bikes are carbon now.

  13. #13
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    steel or aluminum frame for durability-img_1308a.jpg

    How about a Marino custom frame with Fluid Film? Prob like $600 shipped, just lacking production quality. Process time might be 6-8 weeks. Took me almost 4 months cause he had a bunch of orders from Sick Cycles backed up without payment.

    https://www.facebook.com/MarinoBikes/

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    OK, looks like the consensus is steel, cared for well and protected. Any good links for Frame Saver treatment?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbotron View Post
    OK, looks like the consensus is steel, cared for well and protected. Any good links for Frame Saver treatment?
    You might want to take a look at this thread:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/an...t-1073581.html
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbotron View Post
    OK, looks like the consensus is steel, cared for well and protected. Any good links for Frame Saver treatment?
    There is no consensus at all. Based on my experience, which includes battling shitty Canadian winters daily for well over 10 years, I fully disagree with your statement.
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  17. #17
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    What about titanium? Doesn't rust, more comfortable than steel. Repairable to boot if it ever cracks.

    Down side is cost, but if you're ok with used deals can be had.

    If that's not an option, steel.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbotron View Post
    OK, looks like the consensus is steel, cared for well and protected. Any good links for Frame Saver treatment?
    When properly cared for steel is awesome. Unless you ride your bike in terrible conditions and completely neglect it, it will be just fine for years.

    I've used Frame Saver on every steel frame I've owned. (currently 8) but Fluid Film seems to be superior in the "acid test."

    Chazpats link will reveal the results of salt water and acid on steel tubing treated with various products.
    Rigid SS 29er
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  19. #19
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    I think aluminum is a safer bet, but maybe not. I am not a metallurgist.

    EDIT: we need some science on this. Where's Harold?
    Last edited by mtnbkrmike; 09-25-2019 at 07:42 AM.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I think aluminum is a safer bet, but maybe not. I am not a metallurgist.

    EDIT: we need some science on this. Where's Harold?
    lol. not all that much science...just common sense.

    I own 2 steel bikes. My commuter/whatever bike is a steel Salsa Vaya. I rode it some in ugly, salty conditions when I lived in the midwest, but not extensively. My hardtail is a Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead. I now live/ride in the southeast so salty winter conditions are uncommon, but my bikes do get very, very wet at times. Some of my mtb rides involve over a dozen river crossings over knee height. I treated both of my steel frames with framesaver, and I've not been especially careful with either otherwise. They're bikes, and I take general care of them. But I also ride them.

    If you want a cheap beater that you can neglect, by all means, buy a cheap aluminum POS that you can ignore. You'll still have steel parts scattered about on the bike, though, and they'll rust if you neglect the bike. I don't think it's possible to eliminate every single steel part on a bicycle, especially if you're keeping to the cheap beater theme. You're going to wind up with steel somewhere on the bike because sometimes steel is the best material for a given application. But at that point, who cares? If you're going to neglect it, then just treat it as disposable and be done with it.

    But if you actually care about how the bike rides, then buy whatever you want and take care of it. The worse the conditions you expose the bike to, the more care you'll need to take. If you want durability with less upkeep plus a bike that rides nice, then you're probably going to end up with some stainless steel and some Ti stuff on the bike, if not the frame itself, and you're going to pay for it.

  21. #21
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    I too am buying a new winter commuter.

    My view is this...

    If you want to meticulously care for your bike, then go for the steel frame if you want. If you are like me and treat your winter commuter as...a commuter...and basically neglect it because you can't run a hose in the wintertime, then to me it's a no brainer - aluminum.

    Will you be fine with steel? Maybe. Will you be fine with aluminum? Definitely. Will you notice the nicer ride with the steel frame wearing layers of clothing and boots, slogging your way through snow, ice and slush? No.

    And sure - there are a lot of steel components hanging off an aluminum frame. I have replaced all of them more than once. But the frame is still fine. Its a cheap 8 speed Kona hardtail with mechanical disc brakes. Components are dirt cheap.

    Different areas obviously have different conditions. Mine are horrible. Freeze thaw cycles regularly, and TONS of salt. I asked my LBS about this. Maybe ask yours. It may be a lot less brutal in your area. Or maybe you have a better way of caring for your winter bike. Pail of warm water and rags twice a week?

    I always enter winter with the best of intentions but when it's minus 35, I just want to get inside after a ride and thaw out.

    All of this coming from a guy who hates aluminum frames and loves steel...
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  22. #22
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    General note on AL parts in the winter:

    I didn't really appreciate the difference between anodized and non-anodized parts until spring, when the anodized parts are still shiny, and the non-anodized parts crumble into white dust.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  23. #23
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    Well, that's the internets for you: you think you have something all figured out, then somebody gives you an equally good or better argument for the exact opposite .

    Now I'm leaning toward aluminum, basically because, yeah, washing my commuter in the winter doesn't happen as much as it should. I'd love titanium--I've got two titanium bikes already--but I really want to try belt drive, and the only titanium bikes that accommodate those are $$$.

    I guess if I went aluminum, a nice side effect would be that it would be easier to get one with disc brakes. It's nigh impossible to find a steel, disc brake, belt-drive bike that isn't either mad expensive or like 35 lbs.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbotron View Post
    It's nigh impossible to find a steel, disc brake, belt-drive bike that isn't either mad expensive or like 35 lbs.
    You know, Soma Fabrications offer steel, disc brake, belt drive compatible frames. Just sayin'
    Amolan

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    Quote Originally Posted by ranier View Post
    You know, Soma Fabrications offer steel, disc brake, belt drive compatible frames. Just sayin'
    Yeah, I thought about building up a Wolverine. But I'd like to keep it not too much more than $1k, and it looks like a wheelset with an IGH is going to push me past that once I get all the other components together. Still, I haven't taken it out of the running. If I end up with steel, I might still do that.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I too am buying a new winter commuter.

    My view is this...

    If you want to meticulously care for your bike, then go for the steel frame if you want. If you are like me and treat your winter commuter as...a commuter...and basically neglect it because you can't run a hose in the wintertime, then to me it's a no brainer - aluminum.

    Will you be fine with steel? Maybe. Will you be fine with aluminum? Definitely. Will you notice the nicer ride with the steel frame wearing layers of clothing and boots, slogging your way through snow, ice and slush? No.

    And sure - there are a lot of steel components hanging off an aluminum frame. I have replaced all of them more than once. But the frame is still fine. Its a cheap 8 speed Kona hardtail with mechanical disc brakes. Components are dirt cheap.

    Different areas obviously have different conditions. Mine are horrible. Freeze thaw cycles regularly, and TONS of salt. I asked my LBS about this. Maybe ask yours. It may be a lot less brutal in your area. Or maybe you have a better way of caring for your winter bike. Pail of warm water and rags twice a week?

    I always enter winter with the best of intentions but when it's minus 35, I just want to get inside after a ride and thaw out.

    All of this coming from a guy who hates aluminum frames and loves steel...
    I have always kept my bikes inside, so when they need cleaning in the wintertime, yeah, rags and a pail of soapy water do the trick. Doesn't really take that much time in addition to the usual chain lube routine.

    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    General note on AL parts in the winter:

    I didn't really appreciate the difference between anodized and non-anodized parts until spring, when the anodized parts are still shiny, and the non-anodized parts crumble into white dust.
    Good point.

    Salt is pretty terrible on everything. Brings to mind an encounter I had with an auto mechanic some years ago. I have owned the same Honda Fit since it was brand new in 2007. I bought it in Pittsburgh, PA and drove it there for a few years before moving to east TX in 2012. The mechanic I visited in TX freaked out about the rust on the underside of the car for the whole 4.5yrs I lived there. They don't salt the roads there in wintertime (when it was cold enough for ice, they used sand on the bridges and that's about it), and he never really saw that much rust.

    Me, I don't think I'll ever be a dedicated bike commuter throughout deep winter conditions. I just don't like it. IF I was willing to deal with conditions like mtnbkrmike, I'd probably throw down hard on a stainless frame, belt drive, IGH, and dive into corrosion resistance head first, sparing no expense so I could minimize the amount of winter upkeep I needed to do. And then I'd basically tear the whole bike down for an overhaul once it warmed up and I could switch to a secondary bike.

  27. #27
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    steel or aluminum frame for durability

    You guys have me thinking...

    I REALLY want to throw down on a 2020 Unit X. Commuter or not, who wants a shit frame? Not me.

    I have an extra set of alloy wheels from my Honzo doing nothing but gathering dust. I could throw a set of Nicotines on them. I would then have a stock set of 2.6 tires and some 2.3 studded tires that I could swap between.

    Pretty sweet set up. And OMG that gold...

    steel or aluminum frame for durability-img_9682.jpg
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  28. #28
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    Now we're talking!
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    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  29. #29
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    If I were looking for something like this, I'd be pretty tempted to save my pennies and buy a Cannondale Bad Boy 1 were I not riding on trails in my commute. Pretty darned cool bike, albeit at $2K.

  30. #30
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    In my experience, living in MN and riding both steel and aluminum bikes in the winter.... the upkeep and maintenance will do more to keep a bike going than frame material. Find one you like, maintain it.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    In my experience, living in MN and riding both steel and aluminum bikes in the winter.... the upkeep and maintenance will do more to keep a bike going than frame material. Find one you like, maintain it.
    ^ yup.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    In my experience, living in MN and riding both steel and aluminum bikes in the winter.... the upkeep and maintenance will do more to keep a bike going than frame material. Find one you like, maintain it.
    I'd generally agree with this. If you're really looking for a low maintenance bike, some kind of gear hub and belt drive is probably what you're looking for. Frame material is nothing compared to the time you will save not having to check, adjust, clean, and lube a chain/derailleur setup.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    I'd generally agree with this. If you're really looking for a low maintenance bike, some kind of gear hub and belt drive is probably what you're looking for. Frame material is nothing compared to the time you will save not having to check, adjust, clean, and lube a chain/derailleur setup.
    Hence the beauty of a SS commuter. Cheap and easy to maintain drivetrain. If it gets trashed over the winter you can replace the whole thing for $25. Chain- $6-10, freewheel- $15-30.

    Belt drive has its place, but it's not cheap and you need a frame that can accommodate it.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  34. #34
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    ^ I concur.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

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    steel or aluminum frame for durability

    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    I'd generally agree with this. If you're really looking for a low maintenance bike, some kind of gear hub and belt drive is probably what you're looking for. Frame material is nothing compared to the time you will save not having to check, adjust, clean, and lube a chain/derailleur setup.
    Surprisingly I have done okay with my drivetrain. I get about 1.5 seasons out of the rear d before the spring shits the bed and won’t drop into a lower gear. I think the 7 speed Alivio rear d is $21 installed. Apart from that, I can go multiple seasons before the rest of the drivetrain needs replacing, and it’s inexpensive AF to replace.

    I ride 5-7 days a week through the winter. No exceptions regardless of weather. I just dress accordingly.

    My LBS tells me belt drives have a long list of their own unique problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Hence the beauty of a SS commuter. Cheap and easy to maintain drivetrain. If it gets trashed over the winter you can replace the whole thing for $25. Chain- $6-10, freewheel- $15-30.

    Belt drive has its place, but it's not cheap and you need a frame that can accommodate it.
    I wish I could just buy the Unit and be done with it. I commute the other 3 seasons mostly on my fixed gear Paddy Wagon. On the way home from work there is a section near the end of my commute where I have to stand and crank like a sonofa b to try to not fall behind on cadence, for about 15 minutes sustained. Add snow and ice and temps as low as minus 35 and there are just too many blockers to grabbing the bike, as opposed to catching a ride with my GF. I am so tempted but I just don’t think I will fare well and be happy on the SS Unit through the winter. Hence, the geared Unit X.

    I found what what I think might help me immensely this winter maintenance-wise...

    steel or aluminum frame for durability-img_0327.jpg
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post

    I ride 5-7 days a week through the winter. No exceptions regardless of weather. I just dress accordingly.
    Major props, if you live in an area with foul weather, it's not easy. Takes commitment and the right gear for sure!

    My LBS tells me belt drives have a long list of their own unique problems.
    Agreed but every system has its own strong and weak points. Most are directly related to price, but winter commuting throws a wrench in any system.

    I wish I could just buy the Unit and be done with it. I commute the other 3 seasons mostly on my fixed gear Paddy Wagon. On the way home from work there is a section near the end of my commute where I have to stand and crank like a sonofa b to try to not fall behind on cadence, for about 15 minutes sustained. Add snow and ice and temps as low as minus 35 and there are just too many blockers to grabbing the bike, as opposed to catching a ride with my GF. I am so tempted but I just don’t think I will fare well and be happy on the SS Unit through the winter. Hence, the geared Unit X.

    I found what what I think might help me immensely this winter maintenance-wise...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    For sure a quick rinse goes a long way. Salt is a b-tch!!

    Where I live the conditions vary constantly in winter. Some days you can get by with a cross bike, other times a fat bike is best. Sometimes there is no "good" option and you just deal with it.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  37. #37
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    Of course, you can easily change between the Unit and the Unit X.

    How far is your commute?
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  38. #38
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    Screw both. Titanium or plastic.

    Habenero cycles makes ti bikes for cheap. It's my winter ride. My derailleurs rusted out and locked up from rust but the frame is like new.

    It's flexy as **** compared to a modern CF frame though. If you're a big powerful rider and likes stiff bike it's not a good idea. It all depends what you're looking for.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by matto6 View Post
    Screw both. Titanium or plastic.

    Habenero cycles makes ti bikes for cheap. It's my winter ride. My derailleurs rusted out and locked up from rust but the frame is like new.

    It's flexy as **** compared to a modern CF frame though. If you're a big powerful rider and likes stiff bike it's not a good idea. It all depends what you're looking for.
    So for commuting in harsh conditions on a small budget you recommend the two most expensive frame materials? Instead of replacing a $10 chain or a $25 derailleur you recommend investing in a fancy frame that gets used in the harshest environment imaginable?
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  40. #40
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    steel or aluminum frame for durability

    You guys motivated me to rethink things. I concluded that regardless of what direction I go, and whatever the frame material, I need to step up my winter maintenance big time. To this end, today I bought the following:

    steel or aluminum frame for durability-img_0045.jpg

    steel or aluminum frame for durability-img_0046.jpg



    Next, thinking about people I knew who left us way too early, I was reminded that life is short. Way too short. Do what you want, and do it now. Riding a quality bike, regardless of riding/weather conditions, must prevail as the overriding objective. Of life. A man’s gotta have his priorities straight. Right?

    Thanks guys. I kinda lost sight of all this.

    Next purchase...Unit X...

    And some brand new Nicotine studded tires to mount on my spare set of 29 hoops.

    F yeah! Super stoked to buy yet another Kona. I HATE the fact that it will have a bunch of SRAM shit hanging off of it, but I still love Kona. Enough to overcome the taint of the SRAM.

    I should be set for yet another shitty winter of riding.

    EDIT: Yeah. Okay. I think I might have to replace the brakes with some 2 pot Shimanos, and the drivetrain with an 11 speed Shimano set up. Life is also to short to have to tolerate SRAM, even on a winter commuter. I am confident my LBS will give me a sweet deal on a swap before the bike leaves the store. Done. Wow - that was a slippery slope.
    2020 Kona Unit
    2019 Forbidden Druid
    2018 Kona Honzo ST 30th BDay SE
    2015 Kona Paddy Wagon Fixed Gear

  41. #41
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
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    ^ sweet.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  42. #42
    psycho cyclo addict
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    Any frame material will do fine IMO.

    I put >3,500 miles / year on a mixed herd of bikes in all conditions other than pouring rain:

    Steel (ridden most often): Soma Wolverine 2x10 gravel bike and Chris King Cielo SS 29er
    Carbon Scott Spark 930 carbon 1x11 FS 29er
    Titanium Twin Six SS 29er
    Aluminum Fuji Tahoe SL 3x9 29er

    On really crappy snow/ice salt days, I go for steel or aluminum.

    The only frames I've ever cracked were aluminum. They were 5+ years old and had been run through the ringer: down many staircases on urban rides, hit lots of rocks/roots on trails, hucked off drops, etc.

    The Fuji I still have is a 2009 and shows no signs of frame fatigue yet... the Rock Shox Reba fork stanchions are getting a bit worn LOL
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  43. #43
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    I hose my allu bike off with water after every winter ride. My bike is 4 years old now and still spotless. No corrosion on the frame or steel parts.

    I live in a appartment and there is no water tap outside but i solved that with a professional water pressure pump. It holds up to 11.3 Liter / 3 Gallon water inside with still room to build up pressure. Thats enough to clean a muddy fatbike.

    https://youtu.be/s_-bQ8B3Q44

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis1987 View Post
    I hose my allu bike off with water after every winter ride. My bike is 4 years old now and still spotless. No corrosion on the frame or steel parts.

    I live in a appartment and there is no water tap outside but i solved that with a professional water pressure pump. It holds up to 11.3 Liter / 3 Gallon water inside with still room to build up pressure. Thats enough to clean a muddy fatbike.

    https://youtu.be/s_-bQ8B3Q44
    I had the same idea as you except all I could find is the flimsy, collapsible portable shower I posted above, that I was going to use to rinse my bike. Compared to what I came up with, your solution is next level. Unfortunately I can’t find Berthoud products anywhere in Canada. I will keep searching for this or a similar product. Thanks for posting that. It has generated even more ideas.
    2020 Kona Unit
    2019 Forbidden Druid
    2018 Kona Honzo ST 30th BDay SE
    2015 Kona Paddy Wagon Fixed Gear

  45. #45
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    My Berthoud is very sturdy. It was expensive (160€) but it last a lifetime. Mine does 3 Bar water pressure , the same as a garden hose.

    Hozelock , Gloria , Birchmeier are also very good. They also make industrial steel tank pressure pumps that go up to 10 Bar pressure.

    Gloria also makes electric powered pressure pumps , there are also mobile power pressure pumps like the Bosch Fontus.
    Last edited by Dennis1987; 09-30-2019 at 02:15 AM.

  46. #46
    Cycologist
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    Not sure how much pressure you need nor how much this would provide:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-2-Ga...HDXA/307766539

    Edit: a little googling pulls up articles recommending this type of sprayer for bike washing.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  47. #47
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    steel or aluminum frame for durability

    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Not sure how much pressure you need nor how much this would provide:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-2-Ga...HDXA/307766539

    Edit: a little googling pulls up articles recommending this type of sprayer for bike washing.
    Thanks chazpat. I did some more googling and came up with some similar, inexpensive products at Canadian Tire.

    steel or aluminum frame for durability-img_0052.jpg

    And on further searching, I see that the same sprayer you suggested is available at the Canadian Home Depots as well.

    Tons of options.

    I will return my $200+ portable shower later today. I am going to buy 2 sprayers - I will keep one at home and the other at work, and rinse my bike twice a day.

    Thanks guys.
    2020 Kona Unit
    2019 Forbidden Druid
    2018 Kona Honzo ST 30th BDay SE
    2015 Kona Paddy Wagon Fixed Gear

  48. #48
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    Bad news. The 2020 Unit X is not available until Feb or March 2020. There goes my new winter commuter idea straight down the shitter.
    2020 Kona Unit
    2019 Forbidden Druid
    2018 Kona Honzo ST 30th BDay SE
    2015 Kona Paddy Wagon Fixed Gear

  49. #49
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    Friend has a portable shower thing that has a internal bladder that you fill with normal hose pressure. So all you do is hook it up to hose and fill with water, that pressurizes it and fills it with water in one step. He's everyones best friend at the trailhead after a ride!

  50. #50
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    Just to tie the knot on this, I am going steel - building up a 2020 Unit frame.

    Should be sick.

    Thanks to all for your help on this.
    2020 Kona Unit
    2019 Forbidden Druid
    2018 Kona Honzo ST 30th BDay SE
    2015 Kona Paddy Wagon Fixed Gear

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Just to tie the knot on this, I am going steel - building up a 2020 Unit frame.

    Should be sick.

    Thanks to all for your help on this.
    Nice! I use LPS3 in my frames as its easy to find at local hardware stores. Ill have to keep an eye out for the Fluid Film stuff, since we dont have bears that will think im on a steel lollipop!

  52. #52
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    I think if I bought a new, sweet, commuter I would want to ride it first in summer! I'm the same way with vehicles too, I like them new for summer bling. So maybe March arrival is a good thing!
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  53. #53
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    it's not nearly as cool, but I'd say realistically aluminum will be less maintenance. I ride year around and switch between a steel and alu bike, but when the ground is covered with that nasty gray snow I'll take the aluminum frame.
    check out my youtube channel if you want: https://www.youtube.com/HACKANDRIDEBIKES

  54. #54
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    On average steel is the answer. But low quality steel with bad corrosion protection is not going to outlast high-quality aluminium.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan Wolf View Post
    On average steel is the answer. But low quality steel with bad corrosion protection is not going to outlast high-quality aluminium.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Just picked up my new winter bike yesterday. No frame corrosion protection (it was on my “checklist” but me and my LBS completely forgot about it before it was built). Too late now. Oh well.

    It’s replacing my 2008 aluminum Kona Fire Mountain, which (apart from the shitty RockShox fork that soon rusted out, and was replaced with a rigid fork) has seen almost daily duty every winter, since I first bought it in 2008. It served me well.

    My Unit frame is made of Reynolds 520 butted cromoly. Well below the steel of choice of the cork sniffing crew I suspect, but it’s the same steel as my rigid fixed gear, which rides glassy smooth.

    Should be nice!

    steel or aluminum frame for durability-img_9941.jpg




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    2020 Kona Unit
    2019 Forbidden Druid
    2018 Kona Honzo ST 30th BDay SE
    2015 Kona Paddy Wagon Fixed Gear

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