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  1. #1

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    Slick tires for mountain bike commuting

    I was just wondering what your favorite slicks are for mountain bike commuing and also all these guys reporting 5 mph gains just by switching from the big knobbies, could this be a result of changing the tire diameter and not recalibrating the speedometer?

  2. #2
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    2nd question first: Swapping from big knobbies to small slicks will make your speedo read faster than you are actually going, so going the same speed will read faster.

    1st question: true slicks -- Specialized Fat Boys, 26x1.25; commuters -- Kenda Kwest, 26x1.5, or Intense Micro Knobby, 26X2.25, depending on your needs. I run the Intense's.
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  3. #3
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    If you are looking for real speed (after adjusting the computer), I don't think there are many out there that can beat the Ritchie Tom Slick. They are a full slick capable of running at high pressure (provided your rims will take it) and have some pretty thin sizes (I've got a set of 26x1.4" that I can run at the 85psi max listed on the sidewall). D

    on't get near gravel with 'em, but for roadie-tizing a mtb for commuting, I don't know if there is much better out there.

    I've also used the Tioga City Slicker and Bontrager Hard Case (some side knobs, but heavy for serious puncture resistance). Our local police run the Hard Cases and they seem to hold up pretty well.
    Last edited by Psycho Mike; 07-16-2008 at 09:20 AM.
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  4. #4
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    I prefer something slightly larger and more durable for commuting. Look for a tire in the 1.5-1.75 range that is designed to be puncture resistance. The skinny tires tend to loose air and pinch flat really easily, plus the bigger tires have a more comfortable ride. My old favorite were continental top touring if you can find those, the new continental street tires, the "Contact" series looks good but I haven't tried them. My LBS is totally sold on the Panaracer UrbanMax. I will be taking a maiden voyage on them today.
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  5. #5
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    Slicked down MTB'muter


    I like the 26X1.40 Michelin XC Road and I commute almost daily 19-miles one way. It is more efficient than knobbies as I was commuting on those for a few months. But a 5-MPH gain... maybe over a few months of building some endurance or maybe it's the excitement of having the smoove rollers... i don't know as I do not have a computer on my bike.


    I just ride...

    I will be putting knobbies back on at some point as I have some side trials I need to explore. Need to stay in ADV-MTB'muter mode, but i'm in recovery right now after breaking my neck in a off-road MX accident: KTM950 - BIG OFF & HOT NEW LOOK - Turkey Day 2007

  6. #6
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    Riding is a lot easier for sure... I didn't pick up 5mph average but I did pick up about a 2mph average (thats calculated distance over time) on my normal 7.46 mile training route. 11.1mph -> 13mph.

    My commute isn't log enough to really notice much of a difference other than being able to roll in high gear a lot easier for a lot longer.

    Geax Roadsters


    Decent traction on loose stuff too - just found their limit the other day pushing too hard into a rutted gravel corner - minor front skid (no fall though)

  7. #7
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    slicks are the way to go

    I don't have a computer yet, so I don't know about the speed increase. But, I know I power through my tallest gear a lot easier with the slicks. I did a 30 mile commute today and chased a roadie for a long time. I think I made him angry though.

    My wheels are at 95psi and the rim allows 113psi and the Maxxis Detonators go up to 100psi.
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  8. #8
    viva la v-brakes!
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    Also bear in mind that the smaller wheel diameter with small slicks will have you in higher gears, not to mention the fact that your on pavement which is a faster surface then dirt.
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  9. #9
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    Peddle Faster Smoother Quciker Longer....

    I agree - you will spin in a higher gear and I could actually use a larger front chain-ring. Need like a 52 to replace the 48, so yea, I must be peddling faster....

  10. #10
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    Bontrager makes a full slick in a 26 x 1.5
    Michelin makes a commuter tire in 26 x 1.8

    Both run right around 20 dollars.

    As far as speed goes both of these tires will roll faster (less resistance). they are lighter than a knobby tire as well and as stated above you are riding on a smooth surface. So imo it is possible to gain an extra 5mph.
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  11. #11
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    Full on slicks make me nervous so I run a tire that has a tread pattern even on my 700c wheels. For a 26" tire, I'm partial to the Specialized Crossroads or Hemispheres, both are 1.95's. If you want a narrower tire, check out the Nimbus or the Borough CX which are 1.5's.
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  12. #12
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    MTB'muter Slicked Down

    The Michelin XC Roads are 26X1.40 and top out at 87-psi. Not too fat and not too skinny!



    I'm lacing up some "vintage" never used XTR hubs on some MAVIC 121 rims so I can try the Panaracer Urban Max that is 26X1.25 that max at 100-psi.
    No photo yet.



    I make sure that I keep my tires aired to the max limit for less rolling resistance - more efficiency. "FREE HORSEPOWER!" I also found that the Michelin's loose about 5-psi a week so keep a check on them.

  13. #13
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    Schwalbe Big Apple 2.0

    Fat enough that it doesn't look stupid, rolls great, corners beautifully, and, even at 60psi (max is 70, but with the wide slicks, I don't trust my rims), they don't ride too rough.

  14. #14
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    Schwalbe Big Apple 29'ers 2.35
    FWIW I also ran 700x32 Michelin Dynamics







    Good thing spesh gave the stumpy sliding drop outs because I could barely slide a credit card between the tire and the front derailleur.
    I noticed a speed increase with the dynamics ( yes recalibrated speedo) shaving time off of a 3 mile ride by an average of 3.5 minutes.
    With the Big Apples I do notice the mass these are I think said to weigh in at 990g + but once rolling I get the same speeds, times etc.. as I did on the 32mm Dynamics.
    The major difference is that they are far more stable and all around useful, I can hop into a trail, go whizzing off the shoulder into rough gravel etc.... even ran them down an unmaintained road full of wash outs and fist sized rock areas at full speed.
    Last edited by portage29er; 07-15-2008 at 08:30 AM.
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  15. #15
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    I'm running Michelin Country Rock tires on my commuter. They're 1.5" and air up to 72psi. They seem to work great on pavement, tho I haven't tried a full slick to compare them too. That'll be my next upgrade, probably put a full slick in the rear and keep the treads up front.

    I want some tread, as my commute can/will hit some single track on the way home. If I go to full slicks I'll have to stay on the road.

  16. #16
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    It's a little unorthodox but I commuted two miles to school and back every day on 2.1" Panaracer Fire XCs. While they're full knobby they roll nice and fast, they're a good tire to check out if you want the best of both worlds

  17. #17
    What could go wrong ...
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    I'm trying these to see if I like them
    http://www.biketiresdirect.com/produ...il.asp?p=IKSCT
    they have 3 sizes to choose from and the price is right
    or you can browse thru these
    http://www.biketiresdirect.com/searc...sp?so=p&cat=sl
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabidweasel999
    It's a little unorthodox but I commuted two miles to school and back every day on 2.1" Panaracer Fire XCs. While they're full knobby they roll nice and fast, they're a good tire to check out if you want the best of both worlds
    Nah...I'm currently running Rampages and they roll a lot faster than my XC's ever did.
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  19. #19
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    I just swapped out my agressive tires for a set of IRC Metro II 26x2.0 (i think).

    Big big difference in the amount of effort it takes to go the same distance compared to my old knobby tires.

  20. #20
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    I like the Forte (Performance) Fast City ST/K's I've been running. They're light, don't get punctures, handle better than I care to push the bike, and they're cheap as heck, too.

  21. #21
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    I just bought a Fisher Tassajara, and since I ride mostly subdivision streets, had the LBS swap the knobby tires out for some Bontrager Hank 2.2s. The larger tires ride extremely smooth, although I admit I have never ridden any other slicks for comparison. Their grip on gravel and dirt washed into the road really surprised me. I have over 300 miles on them now and not had a puncture yet. The only drawback I could see is that they may be heavier than most other slicks.
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  22. #22

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    I read this wrong...editing my stupidity out!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by portage29er
    Schwalbe Big Apple 29'ers 2.35

    With the Big Apples I do notice the mass these are I think said to weigh in at 990g + but once rolling I get the same speeds, times etc.. as I did on the 32mm Dynamics.
    The major difference is that they are far more stable and all around useful, I can hop into a trail, go whizzing off the shoulder into rough gravel etc.... even ran them down an unmaintained road full of wash outs and fist sized rock areas at full speed.
    I use these on my Kona Kula 2-9. Fantastic tires. Rolling resistance is nil, when compared with the Rampages I was running before. I've taken them off-road a little, and as long as the road less traveled isn't muddy or sandy, I've had good results.

  24. #24
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    I have about 3000 miles on a set of Serfas Drifters 26 x 2.0. Great commuting tires for mtb.

  25. #25
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    Intense Micro Knobby 26x2.25 -- less than 600g, 7,500 L-I-T-T-L-E knobs, and for me and my 819 rims, a perfectly round profile! I'm a clyde, I run 60psi in each, and I can L-E-A-N those puppies over! For the first time, I'm a bit worried about catching a pedal on the asphalt!

    After getting through a week of 'dog days', I was able to do a serious comparison for ride time (no speedo), and I saved 3+ minutes over 5 1/2 miles! And these tires RAIL in nearly ALL conditions (partially cuz of the tire pressure, I do pinball a bit in bigger gravel)!
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiker67
    I just bought a Fisher Tassajara, and since I ride mostly subdivision streets, had the LBS swap the knobby tires out for some Bontrager Hank 2.2s. The larger tires ride extremely smooth, although I admit I have never ridden any other slicks for comparison. Their grip on gravel and dirt washed into the road really surprised me. I have over 300 miles on them now and not had a puncture yet. The only drawback I could see is that they may be heavier than most other slicks.
    Slightly off topic, but I must say that bike looks damn good and so does that Jeep.

    Just a question with regards to using the Tassajara as a commuter bike, is it much more easier compared to the stock knobbly tires? I intend on using a Wahoo as a commuter (well to the trails which are about 7.5 km away) on tarmac and sidewalks and I don't want to switch from slicks to knobblies when I get to the trails.

  27. #27
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    same here

    Quote Originally Posted by citybiker
    I have about 3000 miles on a set of Serfas Drifters 26 x 2.0. Great commuting tires for mtb.
    I have about 4 months on my 26x 1.75 Serafs Drifters FPS (flat protection system) and they are sweet, no problems yet and great traction in wet. We'll see this winter how they take snow. I tried other skinnier (1.25?) tires and my pedals hit the ground on every corner and I got constant flats. I'd say minimum of 1.75 for a MTB frame. good luck...

    -S

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ktse
    Slightly off topic, but I must say that bike looks damn good and so does that Jeep.

    Just a question with regards to using the Tassajara as a commuter bike, is it much more easier compared to the stock knobbly tires? I intend on using a Wahoo as a commuter (well to the trails which are about 7.5 km away) on tarmac and sidewalks and I don't want to switch from slicks to knobblies when I get to the trails.
    Thanks for the comments on the bike & Jeep.

    I think it rides a little bit faster (maybe 1 MPH) with the slicks. I put another set of wheels with old knobby (Bontrager Jones AC) tires on it last weekend to get it ready to ride offroad. I don't know how much, but the tires and wheels were heavier than the stock Tass, and it felt like it rode slower. I didn't switch the magnet for the computer over and therefore don't have any numbers to compare. I guess I am not offering much evidence here, other than it feels better on the road with the slicks.
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  29. #29
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    I've got a set of 2'' slicks, and with a 48t chainring the difference I found is I want an 11t cassete on the rear instead of the 12-28 I usually run with knobbys. That's about 8-9% difference. If you try slicks and like them you might want to consider a second wheelset with a different cassette. I like Mavic Crossrides for this, with 24 bladed spokes they should help top speed also (warning some newer ones don't have eyelets).
    If you have disc brakes and you're really in a hurry 700c road tires are an option on an appropriate ($$$) wheelset . I run 48tX11t with these also but the diameter is bigger. I think 5mph would be a conservative guess with these.
    I use the slicks for streets, fire roads, and flat sandy trails, but for streets and paved bike paths the 700c's rock.
    It doesn't cost much to try slicks and see what they do for you.

  30. #30
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    I think to get the most adavntage out of slicks you need to inflate them to much higher psi. Even on 2'' slicks I run 80psi rear, and 60 frt. You get a lot more gain from this with slicks than with knobbys. If it rides too hard consider a Thudbuster seatpost. Their size still lets me take shortcuts, and explore trails a little bit.

  31. #31
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    I run Conti Gatorskins 26 x 1.125 on my daily commuter.
    Stupidly fast and you'll feel every bump.
    It'll take up to 100psi as well...


    For something more forgiving, I run Conti Sport Contacts in 26 x 1.6
    Again, very fast but slightly plush at the same time.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiker67
    I just bought a Fisher Tassajara, and since I ride mostly subdivision streets, had the LBS swap the knobby tires out for some Bontrager Hank 2.2s. The larger tires ride extremely smooth, although I admit I have never ridden any other slicks for comparison. Their grip on gravel and dirt washed into the road really surprised me. I have over 300 miles on them now and not had a puncture yet. The only drawback I could see is that they may be heavier than most other slicks.



    I had to join just to comment on that Gary Fisher and principally on those Bontrager Hanks very sharp and snazzy looking with that red outline hot. I hope to have my LBS swap out the knobby tires for the same Bontrager Hanks $27 each only draw back is the max PSI on them is 75 hope to push 80 or more on them only city riding.

    found this website showing off the same slick tires great for commuting the red sidewall is a nice trend adds some personality to the bike

    http://www.mobile01.com/topicdetail....7&last=6405529

  33. #33
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    Maxxis Hookworm tires



    I just discovered this thread and was surprised to see that nobody had mentioned the 26 x 2.50 Maxxis Hookworm tires. A year ago I put a set of them on my 2000 Rockhopper FSR, and they completely transformed the bike.

    On the street, they roll silently, and provide tremendous grip for fast cornering.

    It hard to believe, but after roughly 1,500 miles, the treads still look new. When I installed them, I added a pair of Slime super thick tubes, and I've never had a flat.

    Yes, the tires and tubes add weight, but I'm not racing. I couldn't be happier with them.

    Dave
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  34. #34

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    I love Maxxis,but Kenda seems to be putting out some nice street treads.The new Prototypes are sweet,and the K-Rads are grippy,and cheap.

  35. #35
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    hey kiker67, you bike looks sick with the fatty and red pen stripe!!!! Even though they are a bit larger, I like how they look!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by kiker67
    I just bought a Fisher Tassajara, and since I ride mostly subdivision streets, had the LBS swap the knobby tires out for some Bontrager Hank 2.2s. The larger tires ride extremely smooth, although I admit I have never ridden any other slicks for comparison. Their grip on gravel and dirt washed into the road really surprised me. I have over 300 miles on them now and not had a puncture yet. The only drawback I could see is that they may be heavier than most other slicks.
    kiker67

  36. #36
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    Bontrager Road Warrior 26 X 1.50

    Well, this past weekend, my Michelin XR Road made it's last revolution out back:

    I got about 1,000+ miles out of the back tire since I started riding this slick back in May of this year.

    It would have maybe made another 250+ miles, but the rather large shrapnel made for a rather large sidewall gash:

    So I broke out the ol' dolla'dolla bill ya'll trick:


    I could have positioned it a bit better as the tube was poking out a bit once I got to the bike shop, but it got me there!


    So, I made way to the same shop I bought the Michelin to get another.... NONE IN STOCK!
    Needed something, so I'll try this Bontrager Road Warrior out:



    The Bontrager rides smooth, seems a wee bit thinner than the Michelin, but has same, if not more grip, but that could be due to the larger 1.50 size compared to the Michelin 1.40 size.
    Bontrager max's at 80psi, so this too could attribute to the smooth, gripper feel. Will see how many miles I can get out of this tire but affraid this test will be limited as I have a new wheel tire combo coming onto the bike soon - very soon!!!!
    Last edited by GCRad1; 09-04-2008 at 12:00 AM.

  37. #37
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    My bike is brutally rigid so high pressure tires are very unpleasant. I've tried 26x1.0 @ 125psi and that was like riding on the rims. Way too hard.

    I then went to Fat Boy slicks at ~100psi...still too hard.

    I recently bought a set of Schwalbe Marathon 1.5". They have a wide pressure range (65-100psi) so you can pretty well run them where you want. I'm running 70psi up front and 80psi rear. They are working well so far and I have a lot of garbage on my commute.

  38. #38
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    ... and if we just ...

    Alil off topic here but what kind of front lights do you have on that bike now? and is that a titanium frame? nice bike


    Quote Originally Posted by lordmike
    I run Conti Gatorskins 26 x 1.125 on my daily commuter.
    Stupidly fast and you'll feel every bump.
    It'll take up to 100psi as well...


    For something more forgiving, I run Conti Sport Contacts in 26 x 1.6
    Again, very fast but slightly plush at the same time.

  39. #39
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    Panaracer Urban Max 26x1.25

    Got these new little meats, compared to the previous 1.40's I've been running.




    First impression:
    Ecceleration is quicker, but stop peddling and deceleration is just as quick...



  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by comptiger5000
    Schwalbe Big Apple 2.0

    Fat enough that it doesn't look stupid, rolls great, corners beautifully, and, even at 60psi (max is 70, but with the wide slicks, I don't trust my rims), they don't ride too rough.
    I pump my BAs up to 50psi. They sag back to 40 or thereabouts over a week or so and then hold that for weeks/months. My current pair, I replaced the rear at 4k miles, 5k now on the front. My previous pair I got 3k miles and then sold the bike (and the BAs on it), they are still rolling strong with the new owner.

  41. #41

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    I run Spec'd Rhythm Controls or Compound Controls on pretty much anything that hits the pavement. I keep the knobs mounted on spare wheel-sets for when it's time to kick up the dust.

    The Compound Controls are fast and aggressive but don't give you anything if you have to cut through a park (grass, dirt, etc.). The Rhythm Controls have the raised tread on the edges to provide that extra bit of highly noticeable grip for those off road sections.

  42. #42
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    I just switched over to slicks on a second wheelset for days when not in the mud, and covering distance.
    Schwalbe Marathons. Like them so far...

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtreed99
    I was just wondering what your favorite slicks are for mountain bike commuing and also all these guys reporting 5 mph gains just by switching from the big knobbies, could this be a result of changing the tire diameter and not recalibrating the speedometer?
    Ritchey Tom Slick 1.4s, pumped up to 85 PSI: it's like gliding to work.

  44. #44

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    Hello all, new to the forums here.

    I put a set of Ritchey Innovaders 26x1.95 on my backwoods, but its not even a year and the sidewalls cracked, it sits outside at work, but in my garage at home. i have a pair of those michelin Country Rocks here i will try next, but ive been looking at a Schwalbe tire, except for the price.

    Cheers all

  45. #45
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    WTB Vulpine 2.1's are pretty darn awesome!
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  46. #46
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    My Specialized FSR Enduro is rolling on Michelin Country Rock 26 x 1.75. Gettin' me a pair of Michelin City with sidewall reflector for my new commuter build. Read a few reviews that said they're heavy but are good in rain and durable.




  47. #47
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    Total NOOB here, but I love that bike. What is it, and are the frame packs custom-made? Isn't that ACU?

    Pete in Atlanta

  48. #48
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    I'm just going to throw another tire in here for consideration. Hutchinson Acrobat 26X1.95.
    Almost a slick, pimple tread in the middle, small swept back knobs on the dges, and flat protection built in. They show up at Nashbar for about $12 every now and then. They roll fast, and are a little more forgiving than full slicks.There is a weight tradeoff for flat protection.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork
    My Specialized FSR Enduro is rolling on Michelin Country Rock 26 x 1.75. Gettin' me a pair of Michelin City with sidewall reflector for my new commuter build. Read a few reviews that said they're heavy but are good in rain and durable.

    *snip*

    Nice fork I have the same one. Is that the 85mm or the 100mm model? How are you liking it?

  50. #50
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    Bryank930, it's the 85mm. I like it. It's very stiff and beefy--too much fork for doing city riding I like the remote lockout, works well and allows a few mm of travel, so you still get some cushion for potholes and what not. Should also mention that it's very well made just like anything else made in Germania.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mike
    If you are looking for real speed (after adjusting the computer), I don't think there are many out there that can beat the Ritchie Tom Slick. They are a full slick capable of running at high pressure (provided your rims will take it) and have some pretty thin sizes (I've got a set of 26x1.4" that I can run at the 85psi max listed on the sidewall). D

    on't get near gravel with 'em, but for roadie-tizing a mtb for commuting, I don't know if there is much better out there.
    I'll ditto the Ritchey Tom S' 1.4" as well ......... it's narrow enough to roll quite well, but it doesn't look too out of place on a mtb (compared to narrower tires, that is ..... it does look odd at first...but I LOVE them, beings as the majority of my riding these days is road/commuting - I hate having to drive to trails anymore where I used to live, I had a fairly extensive set of networking trails along a river or two that I could loop into a nice 25 mile ride, starting 1/2 mile from my house. Nowadays, I have to drive 1/2 to get to the closest even half decent trails......but I digress....
    There may be better slicks out there, but the Ritchey's work mighty well for me and my circumstances.

  52. #52
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    Kenda Kwest 1.5" are Da BOMB!

    These tires have been really good to me. I prolly have a couple thousand miles on these bad boys and I've used them on all kinds of surfaces. I mostly use them on paved bike paths but have used them on impromptu rides on smooth singletrack here in SoCak. They've withstood the demands of my current clydesdale frame and the extra burden of pulling my 2 yo in his trailer. They're a little on the heavy side but no doubt the extra weight has lent itself to their durability. I've even gone on 40 mile road rides w/ a couple of shavers and managed to avg. >19 mph (albeit the route was F-L-A-T). BTW, the 26x1.5s come in a standard rating (40-65) and a HP @ 100 psi. I have the standard rating. Check them out at http://www.kendausa.com/bicycle/commuter.html

  53. #53
    Crunchatize me Capn'
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    I'll chime in...

    So far I've used the following
    Panaracer Pasala Tourguard 1.25

    Geax Streetrunner 1.25

    Kenda Qwest 1.5 (I don't use the "high pressure model - no need, the regular one is better and has thicker rubber for better flat prevention)

    Michelin City Reflective 1.4

    Specialized Nimbus EX 1.5

    Specialized Tom Slicks (?) 1.0

    Of all of these, I can't say one is significantly better than the other. They work, they're great and they're "install them and forget them". With the 1.5 ish sizes I run 80 psi and the 1.25's I run at 100 psi. One caveat, if you do run 1.25's or lower, get a road pump. You will not get to high pressure with a mtn pump. I suggest the Road Morph by Topeak.

    Running slicks isn't so much about getting gains in speed more so than it is about getting gains in acceleration. This is where the "gee, these are quicker" sensation comes from. I can go just as fast on knobbies as I do on slicks on the road, it just takes a little more effort to get up to speed.

    Another issue to watch out for is handling. For example, on my Kona hardtail I do not like anything smaller than a 1.4. The handling just gets way to finicky and twitchy. Conversely, on my Gary Fisher hardtail, an older (more roadlike) geometry build, I like the 1.25's much, much, better.

  54. #54
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    Jabpn, what's your opinion on the Michelin City reflective? I have the 26 x 1.85 on order from AEBike. Read a couple of good reviews from the REI website but that's about it. They're heavy, I've heard, but I'm looking for durability rather than speed on this new commuter build.

  55. #55
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    I've been riding the Gotham tires from Performance for 2 months. So far so good.
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=5425

  56. #56

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    I previously had some very wide kenda tires on my bike and I have recently put some commuter tires on it. The kenda's were 26x2.35. I put specialized crossroads on that are 26x1.95 multi use tires. The bike handles very nicely and there is a noticable difference in speed. The first ride I did not readjust my computer and it read 11.23 miles on a 10 mile course. I made the switch because I have been doing 1/2 or more of my riding on roads lately. What I dislike about them is the ride seems much harder now. I can feel every little pebble with my but as I ride. I never realized just how much shock absorbtion is provided with fat low pressure tires on a hardtail.

  57. #57
    Crunchatize me Capn'
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork
    Jabpn, what's your opinion on the Michelin City reflective? I have the 26 x 1.85 on order from AEBike. Read a couple of good reviews from the REI website but that's about it. They're heavy, I've heard, but I'm looking for durability rather than speed on this new commuter build.
    I like them just fine. I've got about a month, around 800 miles, on it and it's held up just fine. If it's heavy I don't notice it. The one thing I do like over my Kenda Kwest (on my rear wheel) is that it doesn't pick up as much debris, very small grains of dirt etc., in between the grooves of the tread. Other than that, it's pretty similar to all of the slicks I've tried. So far I've noticed no significant signs of wear or slices in the rubber.

  58. #58

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    Wow this thread is exactly what i was looking for, i ride a MTB all over denver, to work and back as well. Its a rough ride 3 1/2 miles almost all uphill to work in the mornings on knobbies... its all good on the way home though.

    I'm thinking about getting some 'commuter' tires since all i ever seem to ride is paved trails around the city, though i do want the option to hit at least smooth singletracks if nothing else. My bike is a full suspension setup so i think having a nice hard tire without so much 'drag' wouldn't be so bad. I frequently hit a nice loop here that is 18.5 miles paved roundtrip, it seems like its just too much work on full MTB tires, anyway lots of options here thanks for everyone's input I'm sure it is helping a lot of people !

  59. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters


    I just discovered this thread and was surprised to see that nobody had mentioned the 26 x 2.50 Maxxis Hookworm tires. A year ago I put a set of them on my 2000 Rockhopper FSR, and they completely transformed the bike.

    On the street, they roll silently, and provide tremendous grip for fast cornering.

    It hard to believe, but after roughly 1,500 miles, the treads still look new. When I installed them, I added a pair of Slime super thick tubes, and I've never had a flat.

    Yes, the tires and tubes add weight, but I'm not racing. I couldn't be happier with them.

    Dave
    https://www.roadsters.com/
    Those are SICK !

  60. #60
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    continental town and countrys!!!
    first; they last longer than most frames
    second; they grip really well in dry, EXCELLENTLY in wet.
    and third (and to me the most important) they SCREAM LIKE A BANSHEE when you skid'em.
    Better than a bell for alerting pedestrians.

    Also my picks:
    Specialized fat boys (heavy but fast)
    Anything by Schwalbe... their marathon plus line is absurdly long-living.
    Only beef with schwalbes is they're usually expensive so if your riding environment is going to cut up ANY tires, then go for the cheapest city slicker knockoffs you can find.
    I heard Specialized armadillos are available in 26x1.something, I'm running them as road tires and they're really cut resistant but NOT very grippy.

    Happy curb-hunting!

  61. #61

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    Ritchey Tom Slicks

    I have a pair on an old Trek 970 rigid bike and have ridden them extensively on gravel with no problems. Good tires!

  62. #62
    One Colorful Rider
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    Riding on 26 wheels is just plain slow.
    With a bigger wheel it's alot easier to keep your momentum, Better for going over pot holes, and with a bigger wheel-tire your gear inches increace which means further per pedal stroke. I can't hardly even ride a 26' wheel bike accept with Ice Studs on. I couldn't even image riding on a small 26" tire

    I converted my Surly 1x1 to 29er wheels. Starting at 26x2.1 and going to 29x1.8 with the same gearing was a huge difference


  63. #63
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    I run Michelin Country Rock; 26 x 1.75 at 73 max psi. They're big enough that they provide a little shock absorption, but not so big that they aren't fast! Great handling and cornering, good wear resistance. The only gripe I have is that the grooves are both deep and close, so they collect a lot of tiny pebbles and bits of glass. No flats yet though.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  64. #64
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    I used to run Kenda Qwest 26x1.5, but I just switched to Michelin "city" 26x1.8.

    I feel a tad slower with these, but they seem more burly and good for commuting to me

  65. #65
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    I had some Kenda knobbies 26 x 1.95 on my bike. Since I found myself on the road 99% of the time I looked for something that would offer less rolling resistance.

    I just put some Serfas Drifters 26 x 1.50 tires on. Initial impressions are that they do roll a bit easier than the knobbies. I run them at 65psi. They aren't technically slicks but they do have negative tread.

    Serfas Drifters

    I was impatient and bought them from a LBS - I really wanted Continental Sport Contacts or Richey Tom slicks but didn't feel like waiting for delivery...

  66. #66
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    Maxxis Detonator 26 x 1.50 works very good for me. it's bulky enough for a 1.50 so it doesn't look weird on an mtb

    Michelin Trans City 26 x 1.50 is also good but because it has a high sidewall and narrow width it looks more at home on a hybrid bike

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiker67
    I just bought a Fisher Tassajara, and since I ride mostly subdivision streets, had the LBS swap the knobby tires out for some Bontrager Hank 2.2s. The larger tires ride extremely smooth, although I admit I have never ridden any other slicks for comparison. Their grip on gravel and dirt washed into the road really surprised me. I have over 300 miles on them now and not had a puncture yet. The only drawback I could see is that they may be heavier than most other slicks.
    Nice Jeep


    When I was commuting full time on the mtb, I used the 10 dollar slicks from performance bike... the "forte" house brand...I think they were 1.5's... worked great, super cheap. They'd be on sale for 7.99 every now and then.

    Currently on the cyclocross w/29er wheels, I'm using Schwalbe Kojack slicks...they're 700x35, and they are really nice. 35 bucks a pop though.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by carbuncle
    Ritchey Tom Slick 1.4s, pumped up to 85 PSI: it's like gliding to work.

    Yeah maybe but it's like gliding on a rough set of skis down a bumpy mountain. Personally i prefer a wider slick like the Town and Country 2.1's. I run them on all of my mountain bikes. I also have the Ritchey tires you mention but have shifted them over to my wife's bike.

    I didn't like how much it drops the bottom bracket. It really lowers the bike to the ground and like i said before the ride is much rougher. Getting rid of knobbies provides a big advantage on pavement, going narrow is only a very, marginal improvement.

    I'll take the very slight penalty of the wider slick because it is vastly more plush of a ride.

  69. #69
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    I should also mention that I live in a fairly nasty dirt road, so I'm bombing in the rocks maybe 2/3 of a mile down to pavement, and I never had an issue with the cheap performance slicks. I have, however, cut the sidewall on one of my $35 Schwalbe Kojacks...that might have been from a hunk of asphalt that I hit in the bike lane once, though.

    for me on the MTB it was all about getting a slick on there as cheaply as I could. That bike is for the woods, but I had to commute on it while I was building the other one. Now that I have a dedicated commuter, spending more on tires makes more sense.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  70. #70
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    when talking about how i switched over to 700x40 kenda kross tires (slick center knobs on outside) on my 29er i got this response

    It will no doubt be faster. I shaved 5 minutes off my commute each direction when I switched from the Nanos to a skinnier road friendly tire. A 5 minutes each direction on a 7 mile commute is a HYOUUUGE difference.
    i went with these tires for a few reasons.... the biggest was that it cost me under $10 for both tires... I also wanted to be ok to ride off the side of the road or down a gravel path or whatnot... don't have much time on them yet but i'm looking forward to a road ride tommarow


    update
    got a few rides on these tires now... in a 10 mile ride it bumped my speed up 2mph... shaved 6min off my typical 10 mile ride...

    they don't mind riding off the side of the road... or hopping down curbs... but turning down a dirt road they sure got squirly when the road turned sandy... still a great tire for under $10 for the set
    Last edited by donalson; 01-12-2009 at 04:21 PM.
    - Surly Disc trucker
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  71. #71
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    29er commuting tire suggestions

    I am building up a 29er to be my designated commuter. It is going to be disk. Should i go with a 700cc or is there a good 29er tire out there.

  72. #72
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    I've tried a couple of different solutions and found the Ritchey Tm Slicks to be best for me (size 1.5) Others kept pinch flatting on me because I'm just not smart enough to ride my mountain bike like anything but a mountain bike even on the streets, so I hit curbs at speed, bunny hop off of anything that presents the opportunity and generally go over stuff instead of around it. The Tom's hold up pretty well.

    Jonesy

  73. #73

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    Not sure if they were mentioned yet on this thread but I use Avenir Streetster 26" by 2.0"

    I bought them at the same time I bought a bunch of other stuff on Amazon for free shipping. They were $20 a pop.
    http://www.amazon.com/Avenir-Streets.../dp/B00165Q4AI
    Attached Images Attached Images

  74. #74
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    Antone tried the Maxxis Overdrive?

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcufari
    I am building up a 29er to be my designated commuter. It is going to be disk. Should i go with a 700cc or is there a good 29er tire out there.
    I looked far and wide, and the best I found were from Schwalbe. Either the Big Apple or the Kojack, depending on width. The Big Apple is pretty fat, and might look better on a 29er frame. I went with the Kojack (700x35) and I couldn't be happier. I didn't see anything like it in 29er land. Schwalbe makes great tires.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  76. #76
    enjoys skidding
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcufari
    I am building up a 29er to be my designated commuter. It is going to be disk. Should i go with a 700cc or is there a good 29er tire out there.
    What surface are you riding on? Do you want a wide or a skinny tire?

  77. #77
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork
    Antone tried the Maxxis Overdrive?
    Not me, but I`m curious about them too- post if you get some. I was going to order a pair for my sister-in-law`s bike (I`m commutifying it for her) but found Big Apples advertized for the about the same price, now I`m torn Hate to pass up a chance to try out new stuff on someone else`s dime!

    My slick and sorta slick experience to date:

    on mtb commuter
    Spec Nibmus 1.5
    Tom Slick 1.4
    Serfas drifters 1.5
    All felt about the same to me. The Ritcheys developed sidewall cracks in about 4 months (bike stays outside 24-7 in a very dry climate and it`s generally dryrot that kills my slicks before I manage to pedal the road surface off of them), the two pairs of Nimbus each lasted about a year. The Serfas have around six months and counting. They also look coolest, so I`m rooting for them to last well.

    I have Panaracer Messenger 26 x 1.75 on a roadified Burley tandem and like them fine so far, but they`ve only seen about 12 hours of riding.

  78. #78
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    After trying alot of different types through all weather conditions, Maxxis gets my vote

    Using Detonator 1.5" Folding atm, relatively light (485g) and folding, very easy to mount, 80psi max, very comfortable, excellent puncture protection

    Will move onto Xeniths 1.5" Folding, 360g, pure slick and a 60psi max for the summer

  79. #79
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    One thing about the Big Apples. They're heavy, so don't get them if you do a lot of stop and go. They roll easily, and once they're going, they keep going (lots of flywheel effect). However, they take more effort than some light slicks to get moving at first.

  80. #80
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    I used the Serfas Barista's and like them overall minus the short gearing they are 1.25" and roll fast on my hardtail commuter
    Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Rush 4, 1994 Trek 930SHX, 2009 Scott CR1 Team Issue

    Rock More. Roll More. Live More!

  81. #81
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    I use a set of Kenda Kwests 1.5 on a set of training/city wheels. Pump up to 100psi and they roll nice.
    Amolan

  82. #82
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    I run Ritchey Tom Slick 26"x1" in the front on Mavic XC717 Disc rims and Specialized Fat boy 26'x1.25" on my Sun Rhyno Lite Rims.

    They are skinny and I'm pretty use to the look but my knobbies do look a lot better on my mtn

  83. #83
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    corner2.JPG

    I started commuting on these Hookworms that I really liked. Cushy and grippy.
    Now I'm on Big Apples on a 29er. Really cushy (18-25psi) and almost as grippy.
    I also use 35mm Panaracer T-servs and 32mm Urban Maxs on my cross bike. The T-servs have been a greay combo of toughness, weight, speed, and comfort.

  84. #84
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    Anyone try running a 700c rim on their mountain bike? It would open up the wonderful world of road racing tires, and supposedly you can get up to a 28mm tire into most 26" mountain bike frames on that wheel size.

  85. #85
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    Anyone try running a 700c rim on their mountain bike? It would open up the wonderful world of road racing tires, and supposedly you can get up to a 28mm tire into most 26" mountain bike frames on that wheel size.
    700c wheels on a 26" MTB
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  86. #86
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    Chuck... that is some [email protected] cornering. Great lean on the bike while standing slightly more upright on the outside pedal. I always found that to work the best too... although I've never ridden at your angles of attack!

    Ever notice how most road bike pros can't corner for beans?

    Well, my goal is to emulate your cornering style on my 29er. Thanks for setting the bar high.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by racerdave
    Chuck... that is some [email protected] cornering. Great lean on the bike while standing slightly more upright on the outside pedal. I always found that to work the best too... although I've never ridden at your angles of attack!

    Ever notice how most road bike pros can't corner for beans?

    Well, my goal is to emulate your cornering style on my 29er. Thanks for setting the bar high.
    Road bike pros can't corner for beans? How is your cornering at 60mph? I'm betting these guys would probably drop you in no time.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kZSz...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iqwA...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KELC...eature=related

  88. #88
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    Speeds impressive, yes. Some have better technique than others.

    I've seen a lot of sketchy cornering techniques from those guys, not necessarily just on MTN descents.

    I'd give it a go... about my only hope of sticking with any of them.

  89. #89
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    Thanks racerdave!

    Thats cool that you care about carving corners. I would love it if more people spent as much time working on their cornering skills, as they do wih jumping, wheelies, etc. DSCN0815.JPG

    I have a lot of fun carving corners on my 29er with Big Apples, but I usually have to lower the seat to really stand on the outside pedal. So much of it is just confidence in the tires, and knowing what will happen when they start to slide. Tires like hookworms and Big Apples (fat) usually give some warning and slide slowly where road tires let go without warning, and when they do let go, you are on your butt in a nanosecond. Not confidence inspiring.

    RockyRider has a point, in that good road riders are good at cornering at high speed on tiny, rock hard tires, but it dos not look quite as impressive due to the tire limitations.

  90. #90

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    Switching and customizing equiptment to gain performance can lead to problems U nevered dreamed of?, It can also lead to supreme performance and comfort! A Link to opinion on Tires & Tubes is http://home.earthlink.net/~ohallock/ then click on the link Tires & Tubes link there to get to the grey page. I suggest Ritchey "Tom Slick" for a lite weight sidewall front tire and Innova "Swiftors", a real tire with a real sidewall for the Rear, that is with the reserve that U are not carrying GODLY loads on the front end. If U want to practice tire rotation, ie worn out rear tire retired to garbage, front tire moved to the rear and new tire put on the front, or U wish not to pay two different vendors for shipping & handling charges, if both brand tires are not conveniently available from the same vendor when the time comes to purchase tires, or if U must have both front and rear tire treads to match exactly, I would suggest two Innova Swiftors one front and one rear, But a Ritchey "Tom Slick" front tire and Innova "Swiftor" rear tire, do PERFORM together and the treads are somewhatsimilar.
    Last edited by oh ha look; 01-18-2009 at 04:33 PM.

  91. #91
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    I liked using Conti Town & Country's on my old commuter and now I'm riding a 29er with Halo Twin Rails and I'e been very happy with those. I ride a mix of pave, dirt, and trail so the inverted tread designs work well for that. I'll never need to corner like some of you but for what I've been doing they hook up really well. The Contis were almost too hard od a tread design because they barely wore after thousands of miles but on the plus side I never once punctured them either. Now these guys know how to corner:


  92. #92
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    Never need to corner like that? What if you are attacked by hipster fixie messenger ninjas who want to steal your lunch on the way to work? Oh wait... their mid corner pedal strikes will take care of that.

  93. #93
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    Ninja Repellant

    Quote Originally Posted by KeylessChuck
    Never need to corner like that? What if you are attacked by hipster fixie messenger ninjas who want to steal your lunch on the way to work? Oh wait... their mid corner pedal strikes will take care of that.
    In that case...
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  94. #94
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    nice

  95. #95
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    I've been meaning to post my impressions of some different Schwalbe tyres for a while but wanted to get enough miles on them first.

    I've been using them on my 2008 Specialized Epic with Mavic Crossmax SL wheels for mainly road use. I weigh 149lbs approx and have been using the Epic for base training miles on the road. Most of my road riding involves riding in the Cotswolds without too much urban riding. There are a lot of pot holes but not as much debris as you'd get commuting through a city. Rather than go for a full slick my preference is to have a tyre that can do some light offroad if I feel like it.


    2008 Specialized Epic used with all three tyres

    Schwalbe Big Apple 26x2.00" @70PSI (approx weight 790g)
    I've used these tyres for a while and have been pleased with them. They roll well, have plenty of grip in the dry and are hard wearing. The Big Apple in the pic below is my back tyre which looks almost new after doing 5000miles! They work quite well for light offroad too. So long as it isn't wet/ muddy you have plenty of grip. They also don't pick up too many cuts and in 5000miles (UK A roads, B roads and country lanes rather than urban riding) these particular tyres haven't punctured once.

    I have punctured a few times on Big Apples in the past though: Notable ones were a nail through the sidewall halfway down a steep descent and the other time was a big shard of glass through the tread. They're tough but not puncture proof.

    Used with Mavic Crossmax SL wheels they can be fitted on and off the rims fairly easily without taking much effort.

    The downsides are that they're quite a heavy tyre which makes it a bit harder when accelerating. When used at 70PSI the tyre grip levels appear to drop off quite a lot in the wet too. That's not to say they're bad in the wet on tarmac but they never seem as planted as in the dry where they corner on rails.

    I've also had one Big Apple tyre that wasn't round. I ended up replacing it as it appeared to be a manufacturing problem with the tyre.


    Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tread (left) compared to Schwalbe Big Apple tread (right)

    Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 26x2.00" @70PSI (approx weight 550g, lighter than the claimed weight)
    Although I'm a big fan of Schwalbe Big Apple tyres the weight has always been a niggle so I thought I'd try some Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 26x2.00" folding tyres. They're quite expensive but lighter and look more like a slick which should make them faster. With a name like Supreme they must be good. That's what I thought anyway...

    I was completely shocked to set off for the first ride on them to find the bike was buzzing like it had a set of normal knobbly offroad tyres on. I didn't seem to be going any quicker than if I had knobblies either. The problem appears to be that even though the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tyre looks like a slick it has deep tread cuts right across the centre of the tread that increase rolling resistance. You can see from the dirt along the edges of the Marathon Supreme tyre that the tread cuts are in full contact with the road and there isn't a smooth central section like the Schwalbe Big Apple has. Compared to the Schwalbe Big Apple tyres average speeds were almost 1mph lower using the Marathon Supremes. Grip levels seemed ok though.

    They were a bit tighter to get on the rims than Big Apples but not too bad.

    After 100miles I'd had enough of them and ordered some Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres to see if they were any better.

    Schwalbe Marathon Racer 26x1.5" @85PSI (approx weight 420g)
    These tyres are quite a bit lighter than the others. The tread is also a lot thinner than either of the other tyres. Apparently they have a "raceguard" puncture protection strip. I've been running them at 85psi compared to 70 psi for the other tyres. I've only had them a couple of weeks and have done 420 miles. You'd think they would be a lot faster than Schwalbe Big Apples but they aren't. Maybe they need more pressure than 85psi but they buzz more than you'd expect. The central section is slick but it looks like some of the side tread makes contact too. Compared to Big Apples they're noticeably better at accelerating and when climbing. As they're half the weight you'd hope so. Just riding along on the flat at 20mph or so there isn't much in it between them and the Big Apples though.

    Compared to Big Apples the tread compound is a lot softer and they seem to have better wet weather grip.

    Fitting the Marathon Racer tyres on the Crossmax SL wheels was a lot of hassle. It involved using steel tyre levers to get them on which wasn't great.

    The big downside of Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres seems to be that the tread compund is too soft and it's vulnerable to cuts. After 420 miles the back tyre has five bad cuts in and the front has a couple of bad cuts too. Running over that broken bottle in Chipping Sodbury yesterday didn't help. I couldn't see it until too late as the cycle lane was painted green.


    Schwalbe Marathon Racer tread
    Last edited by WR304; 02-07-2009 at 06:01 AM.

  96. #96
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    Thanks, 304- excellent report!

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    close Alternative to a 29er, a 28er conversion of a 26" wheel to a 2" tire

    close Alternative to a 29er, a 28er conversion of a 26" wheel to a 2" tire

    WR304, interesting heads up Schwalbe 26x tire review.http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...05022#poststop
    U did not mention Schwalbe tyre reflective sidewall performance & wear?
    The Kojack slick tire by Shwabe seemed to be more my preference., but one review cited durability issues.

    Ur BIG Apple Review provoked an interest in a wider Innova Swiftor tire the Innova Swiftor 26x2" tire & trying a wider slick/semi slick tire. U are at least 55lb lighter than myself (200LB) (& then add 10-25lbs&> of packed clothes, food, tools, spares, etc) Ridding offroad trail, & tarmac no shoulder fast country roads, shruburban & high speed urban 3 lane divided hiway traffic, ground up debris glass, mangled metal street sweeper leavings, on and near routes around a sanitary landfill site & Incinerator, over anything that can vibrate or fly out of a truck, in the dark.

    The Schwalbe BIG Apple Review brought forth wide tire conversion possibilities for creating & riding a 28er constructed on a 26" wheel by adding 2" tires to manipulate the rear drive wheel diameter & thus manipulate the final wheel gear size, w/o altering other running gear. Although with wheel gear Manipulation by tire size vs. rim size, tires have a compression factor where the tire is loaded & touches the tarmac + a tread wear factor & smaller wheels typically have higher rolling resistance than larger wheels, everything else equal. For trying rear wheel gear size manipulation by application of a wider slick tire, I would probably go with the 26x2 Innova Swiftor as I am currently running several different widths of Swiftor tire and the sidewall is performing. (The Innova Swiftor is a stock tire on some electric motorized bikes). The Innova Swiftor tire sizes are available in 26x in widths 1.25" 1.5" 1.75" thru 2". Innova Swiftors have a sidewall rib to either side of the tread area, and the sidewall rib gets bigger in size the wider the tire, this of course not only adds weight but side wall support and durability. The innova swiftor slick/semi slick tire has diagonal rain grooves to either side of a slick central tread, it also has a squiggly central rain groove down the center of slick central tread, Which I find questionable as it leaves a thinner area for puncture there and may make the tread area wear faster but it does reduce the weight and perhaps foot print of the tire and give displaced water from under the tread a place to go..Etc. I would prefer just a slick tread like the Ritchey Tom SLiCK, but maybe not? The Swiftor is a more supportive rigid tire inflated and the ride can be notacibly rougher if you are use to a springy bouncey tire.

    Tire designs & tire & tube conversions do bring about some issues, (like how much weight U are going to spin w Ur legs speed)
    .................................................. ...............................................(or how fast & far the tire will coast inbetween pedaling)

    SLICK SIDEwall DURABILITY ISSUES
    Issues experienced with Slicks have been sidewall strength issues, where the tire sidewalls appear to wash away in the rain, and the sidewalls are not adequate to retain shape & hold air in a good quality regular wall thickness inner tubes, or take any impact from normal road bumps or be run the slightest bit under inflated. With some Brands of Slick tire with weak lite weight sidewalls immobilizing PINCH FLATS are caused by the rim bottoming out on pavement and pinching the tire & inner tube between the rim and the road, causing Flat after Flat in the rear wheel tube and ripped up bubbling tire sidewalls, going over just road small bumps.

    TIRE FRAME CLEARENCE ISSUES
    In tire conversions preference for reduced knee fatigue & stress is to go from a 1.95 KNOBBY to a smaller width tire 1" - 1.5, because of 27" Racing Bike tire nostalgia, looks, weight, reductions in wind resistance...& reduced knee fatigue for further & faster less tiring commuting times with a better attitude. Other safety issues with tire conversions to a smaller width tire is TIRE FRAME CLEARENCE, prefer lots of space between tire and frame so that, windblown debris, sticks, branches, plant material, etc, can loosely pass thru the clearance space between the bicycle frame and tire & do not get jammed in-between the Tire and the bike frame causing the wheel to stop rotating or causing other possible damage or accident. Too little tire clearance between frame parts can cause stopping and mechanical failure from debris, this includes impaction from ice and snow accumulating and impacted between a tire and Well-secured fender.

    PERSONAL SAFETY TEST, TIRE FRAME CLEARENCE w/ Wheels loose in Bicycle Frame
    Suffering from rapid random access memory decay, distraction, daydreaming & fatigue while ridding in Traffic
    Prefer the width of the tire run on a bike w/ vertical inverted U shaped dropout to be of a width if possible so that the rear quick release can be unlatch & the bike can still be pedaled thru an intersection without much or any tire rubbing against the frame. Being very forgetful riding around with quick release wheels unlatched, prefer closely adjusted canti caliper brakes as that is what holds the unlatched wheels in the bicycle frame. When the bike is lifted up the wheel rattle is what alters to a loose wheel, although the ride might feel a little mushy, dragging and slower while the wheel is unlatched.

    PERSONAL SAFETY MOBILITY MARGIN Quick release Hubs & Bicycle Frame w/ vertical inverted U shaped dropouts, being able to ride on broken QR axle,vs broken solid axle w/ horizontal open front C shape rear dropouts...
    A failsafe safety consideration can be had by running a bicycle Frame w/ vertical inverted U shaped dropouts w quick release wheel hubs. A broken quick release hub axle will generally be ride able home even with a loaded bike, because the Quick release skewer is strong enough to hold the broken axel together and in the frame and allow the bearings to work and the crippled bike can be pedaled home for repairs, unlike a bolt on solid axle hub in a bicycle frame with horizontal open front C shaped rear dropouts where once broken the rear axle parts will allow the rear wheel to be pulled forward by pedaling the chain and the wheel will rub against the frame and separate from the frame and at least one side of the broken axle and bearings be spilled & lost from the wheel hub.

    Advocate for Ban on manufacture or import of bicycle frames w/ horizontal open front C shape rear dropouts.
    http://home.earthlink.net/~ohallock/
    Please see Public Comment Petition "DROPS" aimed at The US Consumer Product Safety Comission
    http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/DROPS/
    Last edited by oh ha look; 01-30-2009 at 11:51 PM.

  98. #98
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    I haven't had any issues with the sidewalls on the Schwalbe tyres I've used. They haven't worn or split although I'm not using them with dynamo lights. All three models I tried have reflective strips and blackwall sidewalls. With both the 26x2.00" and 26x1.5" tyres there's a lot of tyre clearance in my frame and fork.

    I use the tyres at the maximum 70+ PSI on a 4" travel full suspension mountain bike. Riding it on the road you'd have to do something spectacularly daft to get a pinch flat. Saying that, a typical road ride round here sees over half the suspension travel being used.

    The reflective sidewalls show up well in a camera flash but for night riding you shouldn't rely on the reflective tyre sidewalls to be seen. When I was doing all my riding at night a few years ago I used wheel reflectors, pedal reflectors, strips of reflective tape on the wheel rims/hubs and bike frame (red tape on the back of the bike, yellow along the sides and white tape at the front) along with reflective clothing/ sam brown belt, reflective ankle strips and decent lights. I felt that showed up quite well.

    Changing tyre diameter makes a big difference to your bike's gearing. Going from a 26x2.00" Schwalbe Big Apple tyre to a 26x1.5" Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyre has resulted in the gearing on my bike being roughly one rear sprocket lower than previously with 42/32/22 chainrings and 12-27 9 speed cassette. That's not great as you run out of top gears sooner.

  99. #99
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    I run IRC metro II tires on my 26" bike in the summer and WTB slickasaurus tires on the 29er. I dont have a complaint about either. The IRC metro II tires have a low PSI rating (50 or so) but I run them higher than that and dont have any issues. Both make it much easier and faster to traverse pavement.
    -Jeremy
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  100. #100
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    Running large volume tires at high pressures sort of defeats the purpose of using large volume tires in the first place. I rarely exceed 24 psi in my Big Apples but they still roll fast.

    Time yourself at high pressure, then start dropping pressure and keep timing. I'm guessing you won't see any performance drop down to 30 psi in a 2" tire.

  101. #101
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    My tires are more narrow. I think the IRC's are 1.5" and the WTB's are 700x37. I will have to try different pressures and see what happens. I am also a borderline clyde (6'1/200) so I run higher pressures for pinch flat reasons. Good point though- and worth some experimentation when temps warm up a little. For whatever reason I always associate high pressures with less rolling resistance and more speed, but I understand that may not be the case.
    -Jeremy
    08 Redline D440
    Nashbar 'cross frankenbike
    11 Scott CR1

  102. #102
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    I'm running Michelin CiTY 26 x 1.85 tires on my street bike, and I have to say it's great! People have said it's a heavy tire at 500+ grams, but it seems to have a low rolling resistance. I'm not sure if it'ts the light weight of my bike, me, or the tires, but I feel I can take off from a stop pretty fast. It rolls smooth and it's quiet. The treads do not collect rocks or debris. Highly recommend for city riding. Oh, the sidewall reflector is a plus.


  103. #103
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    Continental Contact Security 26x1.75. Heavy, but fast-rolling when up to speed and virtually puncture-proof. Plus I paid £10 a tyre.

  104. #104
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    Serfas Drifters are nice. I use them on my superfly for road flight.

  105. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork
    I'm running Michelin CiTY 26 x 1.85 tires on my street bike, and I have to say it's great! People have said it's a heavy tire at 500+ grams, but it seems to have a low rolling resistance. I'm not sure if it'ts the light weight of my bike, me, or the tires, but I feel I can take off from a stop pretty fast. It rolls smooth and it's quiet. The treads do not collect rocks or debris. Highly recommend for city riding. Oh, the sidewall reflector is a plus.

    is that a rigid fork?
    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Carbon is a fad.
    Quote Originally Posted by robicycle
    Just lube your ass with asscream and ride for how long you want.

  106. #106

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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    I've been meaning to post my impressions of some different Schwalbe tyres for a while but wanted to get enough miles on them first.

    I've been using them on my 2008 Specialized Epic with Mavic Crossmax SL wheels for mainly road use. I weigh 149lbs approx and have been using the Epic for base training miles on the road. Most of my road riding involves riding in the Cotswolds without too much urban riding. There are a lot of pot holes but not as much debris as you'd get commuting through a city. Rather than go for a full slick my preference is to have a tyre that can do some light offroad if I feel like it.


    2008 Specialized Epic used with all three tyres

    Schwalbe Big Apple 26x2.00" @70PSI (approx weight 790g)
    I've used these tyres for a while and have been pleased with them. They roll well, have plenty of grip in the dry and are hard wearing. The Big Apple in the pic below is my back tyre which looks almost new after doing 5000miles! They work quite well for light offroad too. So long as it isn't wet/ muddy you have plenty of grip. They also don't pick up too many cuts and in 5000miles (UK A roads, B roads and country lanes rather than urban riding) these particular tyres haven't punctured once.

    I have punctured a few times on Big Apples in the past though: Notable ones were a nail through the sidewall halfway down a steep descent and the other time was a big shard of glass through the tread. They're tough but not puncture proof.

    Used with Mavic Crossmax SL wheels they can be fitted on and off the rims fairly easily without taking much effort.

    The downsides are that they're quite a heavy tyre which makes it a bit harder when accelerating. When used at 70PSI the tyre grip levels appear to drop off quite a lot in the wet too. That's not to say they're bad in the wet on tarmac but they never seem as planted as in the dry where they corner on rails.

    I've also had one Big Apple tyre that wasn't round. I ended up replacing it as it appeared to be a manufacturing problem with the tyre.


    Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tread (left) compared to Schwalbe Big Apple tread (right)

    Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 26x2.00" @70PSI (approx weight 550g, lighter than the claimed weight)
    Although I'm a big fan of Schwalbe Big Apple tyres the weight has always been a niggle so I thought I'd try some Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 26x2.00" folding tyres. They're quite expensive but lighter and look more like a slick which should make them faster. With a name like Supreme they must be good. That's what I thought anyway...

    I was completely shocked to set off for the first ride on them to find the bike was buzzing like it had a set of normal knobbly offroad tyres on. I didn't seem to be going any quicker than if I had knobblies either. The problem appears to be that even though the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tyre looks like a slick it has deep tread cuts right across the centre of the tread that increase rolling resistance. You can see from the dirt along the edges of the Marathon Supreme tyre that the tread cuts are in full contact with the road and there isn't a smooth central section like the Schwalbe Big Apple has. Compared to the Schwalbe Big Apple tyres average speeds were almost 1mph lower using the Marathon Supremes. Grip levels seemed ok though.

    They were a bit tighter to get on the rims than Big Apples but not too bad.

    After 100miles I'd had enough of them and ordered some Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres to see if they were any better.

    Schwalbe Marathon Racer 26x1.5" @85PSI (approx weight 420g)
    These tyres are quite a bit lighter than the others. The tread is also a lot thinner than either of the other tyres. Apparently they have a "raceguard" puncture protection strip. I've been running them at 85psi compared to 70 psi for the other tyres. I've only had them a couple of weeks and have done 420 miles. You'd think they would be a lot faster than Schwalbe Big Apples but they aren't. Maybe they need more pressure than 85psi but they buzz more than you'd expect. The central section is slick but it looks like some of the side tread makes contact too. Compared to Big Apples they're noticeably better at accelerating and when climbing. As they're half the weight you'd hope so. Just riding along on the flat at 20mph or so there isn't much in it between them and the Big Apples though.

    Compared to Big Apples the tread compound is a lot softer and they seem to have better wet weather grip.

    Fitting the Marathon Racer tyres on the Crossmax SL wheels was a lot of hassle. It involved using steel tyre levers to get them on which wasn't great.

    The big downside of Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres seems to be that the tread compund is too soft and it's vulnerable to cuts. After 420 miles the back tyre has five bad cuts in and the front has a couple of bad cuts too. Running over that broken bottle in Chipping Sodbury yesterday didn't help. I couldn't see it until too late as the cycle lane was painted green.


    Schwalbe Marathon Racer tread

    a most excellent post - if you feel so inclined to get some 26 x 2.0 Kojaks on a whim, let us know, because it would be great to have a review from someone who has ridden them all...

    would be great to know if the Kojaks are much faster, how they corner, and with the 2.0 width despite being slick can they do light trail riding?

  107. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by KeylessChuck
    corner2.JPG

    I started commuting on these Hookworms that I really liked. Cushy and grippy.
    Now I'm on Big Apples on a 29er. Really cushy (18-25psi) and almost as grippy.
    I also use 35mm Panaracer T-servs and 32mm Urban Maxs on my cross bike. The T-servs have been a greay combo of toughness, weight, speed, and comfort.

    great cornering action!!!

    such an awesome part of riding

    perhaps you can write some pointers for people...

  108. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by KeylessChuck
    Thanks racerdave!

    Thats cool that you care about carving corners. I would love it if more people spent as much time working on their cornering skills, as they do wih jumping, wheelies, etc. DSCN0815.JPG

    I have a lot of fun carving corners on my 29er with Big Apples, but I usually have to lower the seat to really stand on the outside pedal. So much of it is just confidence in the tires, and knowing what will happen when they start to slide. Tires like hookworms and Big Apples (fat) usually give some warning and slide slowly where road tires let go without warning, and when they do let go, you are on your butt in a nanosecond. Not confidence inspiring.

    RockyRider has a point, in that good road riders are good at cornering at high speed on tiny, rock hard tires, but it dos not look quite as impressive due to the tire limitations.


    out of interest, what sort of bicycle geometry and suspension do you find ideal for achieving aggressive lean angles? XC? all mountain? preferred head angle? short or long wheelbase?

  109. #109
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    I run Primo Comets in 26x1.5" on my Mesa. They have a max psi of 100 and are smooth as can be. I run them at 85psi or so. It's like riding on glass. Got them with a wheelset I purchased on ebay and don't really know where to find a replacement set when these go. All I can find is ones for recumbents. Is that what I have? It doesn't seem to matter.
    '19 Surly Krampus '18 Soma Wolverine '16 Giant Anthem SX '12 Soma Analog SS '07 Felt F1X '97 Schwinn Mesa SS '86 Fuji Club

  110. #110
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    any more reviews on the Michelin XC?
    i just got a new hardtail, and wanted to do some road riding, not necessarily commuting, but just for the fun of it........i know its good in the dry, but is this tire good in the wet? wet means puddles of water as well. thanks for the help!

  111. #111
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    I use Kenda Komforts. Ride is pretty smooth, not "slick" in the strictest sense of the word. But they allow me to ride uneven pavement, as well as some gravel; without having to worry.




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  112. #112

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    LIVELY FAST RIDE on 26x1 Ritchey TomSLICK front & Innova Swiftor 26x1.25 rear tire

    NARROW SLICKS for a FAST LIVELY ROLL & COAST (reply to WR304 #107)
    Considered online the Innova Swiftor 26x2" & Schwabe Kojaks 26x2", BUT going narrower! not WIDER!,
    1" wide tire in the front 1 1/4" wide tyre in the bak. At 200lb Currently ENJOYING rolling a very LIVELY FAST RIDE on 26x1.5 alloy MTB rims w/ a 26x1 Ritchey TomSLICK tire in the front, & an Innova Swiftor 26x1.25 tire in the bak, both with REGULAR KENDA INNER TUBES. Both tires use the same size inner tube, Kenda 26x1-1.25 w/ shrader valves. Riding across turf and construction sites, & road & side walks, against strong FLAT LAND WIND aprox.16 miles round trip commute, not a lot of potholes to mention and not of the deep spreading NORTHREN POT HOLE TYPE. Appear to be durable tires as run. On the same nite on different legs of the commute got unlucky but lucky, ran the 1" front tire in to a large cobble stone sitting on the tarmac in the dark, & ran the 1.25" rear tire for a block with a shredded multistrand wire stuck in a rain groove by barbs of the mulitstrand wire, bump bump, bump like a bubble, when I pulled the wire out of the tire, I though it was a slice in the tire rubber and that I was ripping off a flap of sliced tire rubber, because of the shredded black insulation on the wire. Neither tires or tubes suffered any damage.(Kenda Kwest looks like a durable similar slick tire for 26" & 700c many widths..)
    The Innova Swiftor size 26x1.25 is a very nice tire, WELL SUITED FOR REAR WHEEL USE.

    The awed couple, My other less lively ride runs the same MTB 26x1.5 alloy rims, Is well suited for off road & road & sidewalk,
    26x1.3 Ritchey TomSLICK front tire, regular Kenda inner tube, 32 spoke wheel & hub, 2.75 lb
    26x1.5 Innova Swiftor rear tire, regular Kenda tube, 36 spoke wheel & hub, 7sp MEGArange gears, 5 lb
    both tires run & accept the same size inner tube Kenda 26x1.50-1.95 w/ shrader valves
    The original tire size was 26x1.95 Knobbys on 26x1.5 rims, slow but durable.

    CHECKyourselfBEFOREyouWRECKyourself, yo goto keep your tires WELL inflated, else they won't be doing any time..
    ifn you dont service your tires they won't service yo.

    (Diamond Safety Bicycle Frames where not developed over nite)
    If interested in personal bicycle safety, Please see http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/DROPS/
    Last edited by oh ha look; 03-29-2009 at 05:24 PM.

  113. #113
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    Maxxis Hookworm 29er?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters


    I just discovered this thread and was surprised to see that nobody had mentioned the 26 x 2.50 Maxxis Hookworm tires. A year ago I put a set of them on my 2000 Rockhopper FSR, and they completely transformed the bike.

    On the street, they roll silently, and provide tremendous grip for fast cornering.

    It hard to believe, but after roughly 1,500 miles, the treads still look new. When I installed them, I added a pair of Slime super thick tubes, and I've never had a flat.

    Yes, the tires and tubes add weight, but I'm not racing. I couldn't be happier with them.

    Dave
    https://www.roadsters.com/
    That tread looks quite similar to the tread pattern of the Bridgestones mounted on my motorcycle. Too bad they don't seem to make the Hookworm for 29ers!

  114. #114

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    Quote Originally Posted by dog.gone
    That tread looks quite similar to the tread pattern of the Bridgestones mounted on my motorcycle. Too bad they don't seem to make the Hookworm for 29ers!


    If you haven't already come across them, you might like to try the Schwalbe Big Apple 29 x 2.35 - not quite 2.5 inch width but still a wide semi-slick

    not to advocate a celebrity culture but KeylessChuck who is clearly a cornering expert mentions them above!

  115. #115
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    Thanks for the suggestion! You're the second person to suggest the Schwalbe's and I'll probably give those a go.

    KeylessChuck has some mad skills - and he's nuts in the all the best ways!

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    Fitting the Marathon Racer tyres on the Crossmax SL wheels was a lot of hassle. It involved using steel tyre levers to get them on which wasn't great.
    I can't give a long term report on the Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres as my 2008 Specialized Epic was stolen at the start of March. The slicks were on the bike at the time and went with it.

    I'd done roughly 1,500 miles on them by then, including a few road club runs. You do have to be very careful with the Marathon Racer tyres doing any offroad of course. You don't have huge amounts of grip once you're off tarmac on the 26x1.5" Marathon Racer tyres at 90psi. I think the Schwalbe Big Apple tyres are probably more confidence inspiring if you want a road tyre that can do some light offroad. Both tyres have their own strengths though. Although they kept getting cuts in the tread I liked the better acceleration and tarmac wet weather grip of the Marathon Racer tyres which is why I'd stuck with them.

    Despite picking up a lot of glass the only actual puncture I had using the Marathon Racer tyres was from a thorn that went in through the tread. The glass in the tyre didn't make its way through the tyre protective strip and I was able to pick it out of the tyre back home rather than by the roadside. I filled the cuts with superglue each time to stop them getting any worse (I would let the tyre down and remove any glass or grit before putting a small amount of superglue into the cut. I would then pump the tyre back up to full pressure before leaving it to dry which seems to work ok for filling the holes.)

    One thing worth mentioning is that the ease or difficulty of fitting tyres depends on your rim choice. With Crossmax SL wheels all the tyres were fairly difficult to get on and off, although they did stretch and loosen up a bit over time. The first time I tried to fit the Marathon Racer tyres it took 15 min per wheel cursing them and using steel tyre levers. It wasn't much fun changing a tube by the roadside either...

    Anyway, my new 2009 Specialized Epic which replaced the stolen bike has DT Swiss XR 4.2D rims and they're much easier to fit tyres to. I've got another set of Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres currently and you can fit them on the DT Swiss XR 4.2D rims without any effort at all, you can probably take them off without needing tyre levers too. I don't think you would want to run this combo at low pressures as I could see the tyre potentially rolling right off the rim under heavy cornering. (The XR 4.2D rims have quite a shallow hook for the tyre bead). At 90psi they're fine though.
    Last edited by WR304; 04-04-2009 at 03:15 PM.

  117. #117
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    I've been running the Schwalbe big apples during the week, swapping out for the maxxis ignitors (and trail riding) on the weekend. The Big Apples roll very nice.

  118. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork
    I'm running Michelin CiTY 26 x 1.85 tires on my street bike, and I have to say it's great! People have said it's a heavy tire at 500+ grams, but it seems to have a low rolling resistance. I'm not sure if it'ts the light weight of my bike, me, or the tires, but I feel I can take off from a stop pretty fast. It rolls smooth and it's quiet. The treads do not collect rocks or debris. Highly recommend for city riding. Oh, the sidewall reflector is a plus.
    I had been running cheapo Forte Metro 26 x 1.5's that I stole off the old lady'd MTB after she got a roadie. Definitely made my bike WAY faster than 2.1 knobbies, but I was never really happy with them. With 65 psi max my rear tire always looked low when I was riding (I'm ~175 lbs). Plus I cut down the wash behind my neighborhood to get to town, and those tires were not very good at dealing with the random gravel and large rocks on the hardpacked trail. Smooth dirt was fine, but start hitting stuff and they wanted to kick out rather than roll over.

    Got a big glass cut last week, so it gave me a reason to replace them. Was going to just pick up another 1.5" cheapie, but the shop I stopped in only had 1.25's, and I didn't want to go smaller, so I pciekd up a set of Michelin City 1.85's. Mounted them up and went on a ~15 mile ride last night with the gf. I started off at ~80 psi, these things rolled every bit as fast as the 1.5's, if not faster. You can tell there is more weight when accellerating, but it's not bad at all. Smoothed out the rougher asphalt much more than the Forte's. On the way back I aired down to 60 psi, and expansion joints and marble sized rocks started to disappear. I jumped on some dirt sections where I could and wasn't nearly as afraid when corning and hitting larger debri. Still no knobbie, but handles things as well as I expected.

    Today I dropped em to 40 psi and took a quick spin thru the neighborhood. Still fast, and now really absorb the little bumps. So far I am pleased with my purchase. The reflector is a big plus, as djork stated. Most of the time I get to go anywhere on my bike it's an after-dark ride to a meeting or something like that.

  119. #119
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    I converted my old Rocky Mountain Fusion into a commuter. I am mostly on pavement, but I also have to go through a section of packed dirt. So I got the Serfas Vermin. They have side knobs for cornering but are kind of smooth in the center for fast rolling.

  120. #120
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    Here are a couple of shots of my Zaskar Team with a rigid Winwood fork and Panaracer T-Serv tires. They are great tires with a dual compound tire tread, use them with a really light tube because they have a puncture resistant kevlar liner.
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  121. #121
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    www.balloonbikes.com...

    I just got a set of Marathon Supreme 29x2.0 for the Karate Monkey, and have been very impressed so far. Schwalbe now offers the Big Apple in a folding "LiteSkin" version, and like the 2.0 Marathon Supreme, the Apples came with a little card advertising a site called www.balloonbikes.com. Basically, the gist is that gigantic slick tires, at lower pressures, provide more vibration damping than hydraulic suspension, while having a large rollout so you can run over stuff really well and be highly efficient. I think about all the 26x1.0, 26x1.25, and 26x1.5 commuter tires I've had over the years, how I ended up with these high-pressure, twitchy, small-rollout, wheels that beat me up. Now I'm commuting with 30psi front and rear, and I feel comfortable, stable, and fast. Also got some Schwalbe Ultremo 700x25, rated 85-115 psi; I've been riding those at 85psi too and have been loving it. Other people may disagree, but for me, big tires at low pressures is the way to go... reading about people's problems with with ride quality, efficiency, computer calibration, etc, thinking to myself, "no problems here!"

    Also big ups to Schwalbe tubes, which are hand-assembled and individually tested by German physicists; they are expensive, they do not seem to lose air nearly as quickly as regular tubes, and I like having the full Schwalbe "system."

    And yeah, converting 26" to 700" commuter is all good. Rollout of a 700x32 may be about the same as a 26x2.35, so I don't know how much efficiency you'd gain or lose comparatively. But, a 700x32 is MUCH bigger rollout than a 26x1.25, and it'll be cushier with the longer spokes...

  122. #122
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    That's interesting about the Schwalbe Big Apple "liteskin" tyres. I might have to get some.

    If you look at this listing of the different Big Apple tyres the "liteskin" models use the "speedgrip" compound whilst the non folding Big Apple uses the "Allround" compound.

    http://www.schwalbetires.com/big_apple

    The "speedgrip" compound is what my current 26 x 1.5" Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres use. The wet weather grip is great but they do pick up glass and cut easily.
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  123. #123
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    I totally agree. Big tires-Low pressure is a great way to get around fast and comfortably.

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    That's interesting about the Schwalbe Big Apple "liteskin" tyres. I might have to get some.

    ...

    The "speedgrip" compound is what my current 26 x 1.5" Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres use. The wet weather grip is great but they do pick up glass and cut easily.
    I had an opportunity so I picked up a pair of liteskin BAs and I like them fine. Not sure I can tell any real performance difference from the regulars. These are my 6th and 7th 26x2.0 BAs (only one of which I wore out, I have 4 still, chucked the one that wore out after 4k miles, sent the 1st 2 on their way w/ the bike they were on).

    The one that wore out I opened a 1/2" x 1/2" flap in its 1st week with a drywall screw, and I still got 4k miles out of it after that. Pretty much all the flats I ever got on that tire were things getting in through that flap.

    I had my 1st flat in the liteskin last night after ~1k miles. There were several abrasions on the tube in the vicinity of the leak but the actual leak was simply not visible. I couldn't find anything puncturing the tire but it seemed like there was a bump inside so I attempted to sand it down while I had the whole thing open.

    The skinny sidewall of the liteskin is eye popping, but seems to work.

    I just picked up a pair of 700x32 marathon supremes for a bike that is becoming less hypothetical by the day. If their rigidity scales out to the 26x2.0 version, I think I will stick w/ BAs at that size.

  125. #125
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    Hi WR! sorry to hear that you bike was stolen!
    One hypothetical question - If you were riding a rigid frame, would the comfort of the Big Apples sway you away from the performance gain from the Marathon Racers?

    -Raj

  126. #126
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    That's actually a difficult one to answer. I'd say that when used with slick tyres all the ride comfort on my current bike comes from the suspension rather than the tyres. You barely feel a thing through potholes yet it still pedals really well at the same time.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showpost.php?...&postcount=127

    If I was using a rigid bike then the extra comfort from the larger tyres would be worth having. It's not so much tyre volume but also tyre pressure that you need to consider. In terms of comfort the 2.00" Big Apple tyre at 60psi is still going to give a fairly firm ride. It's not going to give you huge amounts of cushioning at that pressure. You'll probably find that you need to drop the tyre pressure down to 35-40psi before it starts offering any "balloon bike" comfort benefits. Choosing one of the wider big apple tyres like the 2.35" model would probably be better again comfort wise.

    From a performance perspective there really isn't much in it at all when both tyres are fully inflated. The Schwalbe Marathon Racer 26x1.5" tyres knock 1.5lbs approx off the bike weight compared to 26x2.00" Schwalbe Big Apple steel bead tyres which you can feel when accelerating and up short power climbs. If you're doing a lot of stop start riding (like commuting in heavy traffic for example) then the benefit of the lighter tyres is worth having.

    Once you've accelerated up to a cruising speed then the 2.00" Big Apple tyre at 60psi doesn't give anything away to the 1.5" Marathon Racer at 90psi. I had a look back over some old downloaded ride data and there's no measurable time difference that I can see between the two tyres over a typical training ride of 4hrs+ on the road. There isn't even much of a difference on climbs, maybe a few seconds but not enough to safely say it's because of the tyres (hills here are typically 1.5miles to 2miles of approximately 10% gradient). You certainly aren't going to see any large 1-2mph speed increases overall.

    I should have taken a pic of my rear Marathon Racer tyre the other day as the dirt left on it showed the contact patch really well. Basically, even at 90psi the Marathon Racer tyre doesn't roll exclusively on the slick centre section and has quite a lot of tyre in contact with the road. A significant amount of the triangular cut tread to either side appears to touch the road also which must add some rolling resistance.

  127. #127

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    Quote Originally Posted by dana109
    I converted my old Rocky Mountain Fusion into a commuter. I am mostly on pavement, but I also have to go through a section of packed dirt. So I got the Serfas Vermin. They have side knobs for cornering but are kind of smooth in the center for fast rolling.
    these look almost identical to kenda kwick, which roll pretty fast but don't inspire confidence either offroad or cornering on pavement.

  128. #128
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    I run WTB Slickasaurus comps in 1.5, pretty happy so far.

    They roll pretty fast and are not too bad on cornering, though I don't have the need to push them very hard in that respect (my commute happens to be in a straight line). Rated for 80psi max.

    They were fairly inexpensive when I bought them from pricepoint back in December.

  129. #129

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    I grew up hoping life would be a straight line...

    then I realised there were a sh7tload of corners.

    Now I'm used to corners and they can be fun,

    although it is still important to remind myself

    every so often

    that the horizon is ahead in a very long

    and distant straight line.

    Ride on.

  130. #130
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    here is mine....

    As long as I'm on the call sheet and it's listed on IMDb, it's all good.

  131. #131
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    I ride Bontrager Hanks... have about 2,000 miles on these


    <br>
    Last edited by styleelements; 04-23-2009 at 02:32 PM.

  132. #132
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    Where are you guys buying your tires from? I'm looking for some slicks for the wife's bike. Preferably in the 26x1.5. I'm thinking Kenda Kwest or something like that.

  133. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by p nut
    Where are you guys buying your tires from? I'm looking for some slicks for the wife's bike. Preferably in the 26x1.5. I'm thinking Kenda Kwest or something like that.
    Well, I got my last set at REI. If your LBS doesn't have the size you're looking for, try Nashbar or Jenson USA.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  134. #134
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    got my kenda kross tires from nashbar to the tune of $5 a pop (700x40)... recently tossed a 700x32 specialized borough cx... my LBS buddy had a huge pile of used rubber... said i could take what I wanted... it was nearly new... don't know why it was in there... but it's been a good tire to me so far
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  135. #135

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    Specialized Nimbus 1.5's pumped up to 75-80psi.
    http://www.mtbr.com/cat/tires-and-wh...57_151crx.aspx

  136. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    That's interesting about the Schwalbe Big Apple "liteskin" tyres. I might have to get some.
    Well I went down to the LBS today to see about getting a set. The UK pricing is seriously expensive though.

    For a 26x2.00" Schwalbe Big Apple Liteskin tyre the retail price is £53.00 GBP per tyre, making it £106 GBP per pair. I had a quick look online and they're £41.00 GBP a tyre mail order. That seems like a lot for an MTB slick, especially when you consider that the non folding version is only £22.00 GBP per tyre.

  137. #137
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    your tires are on backwards.

  138. #138
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    maybe have someone experience with schwalbe Hurricane tyre?

    http://www.schwalbe.com/gbl/en/bicyc...n_subPoint=MTB

  139. #139
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    Ive been running Specialized Nimbus Reflect for a while now. kind of heavy and stiff but they are great at night and have enough tread for riding in the rain but are still fast rolling. broken glass doesnt faze them and I have had only 3 flats in the last 3,000 miles.


  140. #140
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    Hi WR304!
    I'm the biker from Croatia,( if anyone heard of it... :-) )
    looking to buy some new tires. Probably Schwalbe M. Supreme...
    Just as you, I thought they would be great but the price was too high in my opinion.
    That much I pay for the car tire.
    I even send e-mail to Schwalbe with some question but no replay-that didn't help either.

    All the things you mentioned did come to my mind but I was thinking I'm just emagining tings.

    I just wanted to tell you that I'm grateful for your posts. It sure did help me not to make a bad desicion.
    I know that all that is subjective but from all your posts I can see that you think same as I do and that same things boder you.
    Thak you for your effort.
    All of us who will go with your advice will eventually (litle by litle) make a world better place because the designers will have to start thinking what actually works rather then just looks good.
    Maybe that will be your profit too.

    P.S. If my english sucks don't blame me people, how is your's croatian. :-))
    Last edited by Mr Wheeler; 06-14-2009 at 03:13 AM.

  141. #141
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    Ritchey Speedmax Delta 2.1 are OK allround tires.
    Chep, good thred, light even wired.

    They do buzz, but are fast (cos of the center line) and hold off road too-tested!!!
    3 complaints:
    mass unnevanly distributed a bit
    weight varies
    side wall are thin (good for weight) and dosent look long lasting

  142. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by dana109
    I converted my old Rocky Mountain Fusion into a commuter. I am mostly on pavement, but I also have to go through a section of packed dirt. So I got the Serfas Vermin. They have side knobs for cornering but are kind of smooth in the center for fast rolling.
    Ive also done that with my RMB fusion. I have switched from the michlens country rock tires now and have went with a richety tom slick 26x1 in both front and rear. Now Ive been able to bast past most roadies i encounter. But i also have drop bars on it now so basicilly it is a road bike since the tires are 25mm wide and that is as thin as most road tires are.

  143. #143
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    In the past I've used fat slicks (just like Maxis Hookworms, only made for Schwinn). They rolled fine and absorbed a lot of bumps.

    However, on my 29er I wanted to try some narrower, harder tires for street duty. So I went with some Vittoria Adventure Comforts in 700 x 35c. Here's a cross section:



    They roll VERY fast, and unfortunately, I can also feel the road bumps a bit more... but they are so much faster that I don't care. I've currently got some thorn strips in there with normal tubes and haven't gotten any thorns yet. I hoping that'll be good enough, because I really don't want to put sealant in these tubes.

    Anyway, one of the many benefits of a 29er is being able to run faster 700C tires.

  144. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wheeler
    Hi WR304!
    I'm the biker from Croatia,( if anyone heard of it... :-) )
    looking to buy some new tires. Probably Schwalbe M. Supreme...
    Just as you, I thought they would be great but the price was too high in my opinion.
    That much I pay for the car tire.
    I even send e-mail to Schwalbe with some question but no replay-that didn't help either.

    All the things you mentioned did come to my mind but I was thinking I'm just emagining tings.

    I just wanted to tell you that I'm grateful for your posts. It sure did help me not to make a bad desicion.
    I know that all that is subjective but from all your posts I can see that you think same as I do and that same things boder you.
    Thak you for your effort.
    All of us who will go with your advice will eventually (litle by litle) make a world better place because the designers will have to start thinking what actually works rather then just looks good.
    Maybe that will be your profit too.

    P.S. If my english sucks don't blame me people, how is your's croatian. :-))
    Hi Mr Wheeler,

    I'm glad my posts were helpful.

    With a lot of bike kit you only ever find out about the shortcomings once you've bought it. I couldn't find that much information about the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tyre online before buying them. There were a few comments on some touring forums and some passing references to them on MTBR but not much detail.

    Based on my 26x1.5" Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres the Schwalbe Big Apple Liteskin tyre is probably just a (expensive) road tyre. For all round use the non folding Big Apple is likely to be better as it has a harder tread compound which will last longer. The "speedgrip" compound is a bit soft and very vulnerable to cuts. Riding my Marathon Racer tyres on rocky bridleway and gravel has really hammered them. There are tiny holes all over the tread now. The sides of the tyre tread (the actual tyre tread rather than the tyre sidewalls) are disintegrating too.

  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    Hi Mr Wheeler,
    With a lot of bike kit you only ever find out about the shortcomings once you've bought it.
    Big, sad truth!
    But I guess this is where forums help.

    I couldn't find that much information about the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme either. From visually poin of view they were most beautifle tires I'v seen, light weight and puncture protected, perfect dimnsions (26x2.0) but I decided not to go with them. I happy with my decision so far because I see now that they are not prefect and cost too much.
    Manufacturers are (in my opinion) pushing the limits every year further and further.
    Inovations are coming too but I fell that the price is leading the race more and more.

    Not this time!!!

  146. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by GpzGuy
    However, on my 29er I wanted to try some narrower, harder tires for street duty. So I went with some Vittoria Adventure Comforts in 700 x 35c. Here's a cross section:



    They roll VERY fast, and unfortunately, I can also feel the road bumps a bit more... but they are so much faster that I don't care. I've currently got some thorn strips in there with normal tubes and haven't gotten any thorns yet. I hoping that'll be good enough, because I really don't want to put sealant in these tubes.

    I'v tried exacly the same tire's on my city mtb. 26x1.75
    They were relatively cheep and had puncture protection but I didnt like them one bit!!
    From the first moment I was unhappy.

    They were hursh as hell even the pressure was 3 bar (43 psi)!!!
    Side wall is thick almost as the center line so the feeling was like I'm rideing on my rim.
    I ride HT and used to higher volume ties so it could be me but with other tires 1.9 never felt anything similar.
    Plus they were hevy with 900 grams a piece.
    Thred was bad also. Hum is high and little bits of stons were just picked up and held in the thred. (perfect for that) Lots of them!!! I'v used screwdriver to plug them out.
    The most important thing -the speed- was missing. I'v felt no gain (or very minimal) in speed over the 2,125 tires previously used.

    Only plus I would give them would be thred were judging by the hard compound but I'm not sure with this couse I'v took them down very, very fast and give away. No tears dropped!

  147. #147
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    Anyone run UST commuter tires/tyres ?
    **** Looking for a Sram 9.0SL rear hub *****

  148. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wheeler
    I'v tried exacly the same tire's on my city mtb. 26x1.75
    They were relatively cheep and had puncture protection but I didnt like them one bit!!
    From the first moment I was unhappy.

    They were hursh as hell even the pressure was 3 bar (43 psi)!!!
    Side wall is thick almost as the center line so the feeling was like I'm rideing on my rim.
    I ride HT and used to higher volume ties so it could be me but with other tires 1.9 never felt anything similar.
    Plus they were hevy with 900 grams a piece.
    Thred was bad also. Hum is high and little bits of stons were just picked up and held in the thred. (perfect for that) Lots of them!!! I'v used screwdriver to plug them out.
    The most important thing -the speed- was missing. I'v felt no gain (or very minimal) in speed over the 2,125 tires previously used.

    Only plus I would give them would be thred were judging by the hard compound but I'm not sure with this couse I'v took them down very, very fast and give away. No tears dropped!
    I think they're a bit different in 700C, and only 1.4 inches wide. Yep, I knew they'd be stiff and a bit on the heavy side when I got them, but I've got thorns here like you wouldn't believe. And while they are admittedly stiff, they are nothing compared to how harsh a road bike tire can be... I'm not going out of my way to swerve and avoid potholes with these either. I find that when they get up to speed, they're pretty darn fast. I know I'm faster on my 29er with these tires than I was on my 26er rolling with slick Hookworms. Haven't noticed any hum, and I've rolled over plenty of gravel and not picked up anything. My other consideration is that this tread will still provide good traction in the rain, and the Hookworms were darn right scarey in the rain.

    The only downside I've had with these tires is having to pump them up to 80 psi with my compressor and some dish soap in order to get the beads to properly set.

  149. #149
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    Big Apples or Fat Franks. I tried skinny MTB slicks once and they result in a harsh ride. I couldn't ride with them more a few miles without feeling the road hammer me. Suspension made it somewhat bearable but it still didn't feel comfortable. Fat slicks are the right answer on a 26" wheelset!

  150. #150
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    Schwalbe now offers a 700X50 Fat Frank. If your bike can take it, its the fattest slick now on the market!

  151. #151
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    I'm sold on the Hookworms, I must have read a hundred reviews, just bought a pair. I didn't think that going to slick would give me fat tire options, and I actually stumbled on this thread while searching for reviews on the IRC Metro II, but man was I happily surprised. It also doesn't hurt that they look like sex.
    Last edited by The Red; 11-21-2009 at 03:59 PM.
    Be excellent to each other.

  152. #152
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    Just a heads up for anyone looking for some urban tires....

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...=9304&eid=5098

  153. #153
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    650b Fat Slick

    Is there such a thing as a fat 650b slick?

  154. #154
    mtbr member
    Reputation: arphaxhad's Avatar
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    Found the answer, thanks
    Last edited by arphaxhad; 12-02-2009 at 11:44 AM.

  155. #155
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    For anyone who wants a tire that is fast rolling but not completely slick, try out he Kenda K-Rad. Bought a pair 26x2.3 for my bike, i like them alot. they also do decent when needing to hop off the pavement for any reason.

  156. #156
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    Reputation: louisssss's Avatar
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    2010 RH SL Pro w/ Specialized Armadillo Nimbis 26x1.5
    Riding them at the max rated 80psi
    anyone have any questions? i may be able to answer...
    RH SL Pro

  157. #157
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsgl
    Is there such a thing as a fat 650b slick?
    Slick, yes. Fat.. err, not really.

    http://jensonusa.com/store/product/T...+Vie+Tire.aspx

    http://jensonusa.com/store/product/T...ifty+Tire.aspx
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  158. #158
    Recreational Racer
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    Richie Tom Slicks

    1.4 Tom Slicks hold up well. I've even used them once for an XC raced on crushed coral roads and trails. Not the best picture but you get the idea.

    Slick tires for mountain bike commuting-_dsc2352.jpg
    “Let me 'splain. No, there is too much. Let me sum up.”

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