Securing quick-release wheels and seat-posts.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Securing quick-release wheels and seat-posts.

    Just a quickie.

    I was just out in the shed sorting out my son's 'new' station bike and thought I'd pass on a security bodge I've used for years. I might have shared it before, I can't remember?

    Quick-release wheels and posts are a security issue as they allow your bits to be stolen in seconds. For high-risk areas it's probably still better to cable the wheels together but here is a simple way to stump the opportunist.

    Close the lever close to the frame a put a jubilee clip around the lever and frame. This is a cheap clip, which I reckon you could snap quite easily, but a good quality clip isn't coming off without tools. I position the clip so that the screw is in an awkward place, here it is inside the frame pointing down, so that even if the scroat has the tools, it's still hard to get off.

    For extra security you could put more than one on. It doesn't stop the removal of the QR but it slows the process down so much I'm pretty sure it will put off most casual thieves. If the bike is nice, a layer of tape around the stay will stop the frame getting scratched.

    Securing quick-release wheels and seat-posts.-001-2-.jpg

  2. #2
    sofa king awsm
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    Must be fun when you have to change an innertube in the pouring rain!


    "Scroat." Man, I haven't called someone that in years. I'm bringing that back into rotation.
    Baby, I want my face to be your quiver killer.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Bluth View Post
    "Scroat." Man, I haven't called someone that in years.
    Popular abbreviation round my way.

    The clip doesn't stop you getting the wheel off. It wouldn't stop a thief if he was really trying. It's just a surprise for the opportunist scroat, enough to put him off hopefully. As long as you have a screwdriver on your multi-tool the clip is off easily enough.

  4. #4
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    Sunlite makes good cheap locking skewers. Other brands make better locking ones. They're all cheaper than new wheels.

  5. #5
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    I know there are better solutions out there. This is just a cheap fix, especially if you have the clips lying around already.

  6. #6
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    This is a good idea that is inexpensive, specially for us DIY'ers who have a coffee can full of hose clamps. I did invest in the locking skewer set that takes a 5mm allen wrench. IIRC less than ten bucks. But I just had the frame powder coated this winter. So for me this isn't an option.
    It looks to me like the easiest way to get a wheel off in the pouring rain would be a 5/16 or 8mm nut driver.
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    I did invest in the locking skewer set that takes a 5mm allen wrench. IIRC less than ten bucks. But I just had the frame powder coated this winter. So for me this isn't an option.
    My reasoning is that any bike used for commuting and left unattended in public should be as unappealing as possible to the prospective thief. The bike I just built up for my son, a Specialized Sirus, looked far to tidy so I've trashed it up a bit. The new mud-guards were too shiny so it took a scouring pad to them and wrapped ducktape round the stays to look like bodge mends. I painted car under-sealer in strategic places to look like dirt and corrosion and fitted the rustiest pedals I could find. Painted over the logos on the brand new Specialized tyres and put a totally naff cover on the seat.

    The hope is that the bike will look so junky from a distance that the thief won't even bother coming over for a closer look. Hopefully he'll steal the shiny newly powder-coated one at the other end of the rack ;0)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    My reasoning is that any bike used for commuting and left unattended in public should be as unappealing as possible to the prospective thief. The bike I just built up for my son, a Specialized Sirus, looked far to tidy so I've trashed it up a bit.
    Completely understood. My Marin spent the first 24 years in my possession with a faded yellow and orange paint job. Never cleaned it and it was far from attractive. Since I retired, AND I like the bike so much, I prettied it up. The hose clamp idea fits the motif to a tee.
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    The hose clamp idea fits the motif to a tee.
    Exactly. Even better once it rusts.

    I also put a rusty bell on the bike and an old light bracket that serves no practical purpose.

  10. #10
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    My commuter has skewers that require an allen wrench to loosen on wheels and seatpost. Still not gonna prevent a thief from stealing, but seeing that parts can't be removed quickly might dissuade someone from trying to steal a part off my bike. I usually don't lock my bike out in the public for long periods of time anyway when I run errands. I have a bike locker at work.

    Sent from my C6916 using Tapatalk

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by djork View Post
    My commuter has skewers that require an allen wrench to loosen on wheels and seatpost. Still not gonna prevent a thief from stealing, but seeing that parts can't be removed quickly might dissuade someone from trying to steal a part off my bike. I usually don't lock my bike out in the public for long periods of time anyway when I run errands. I have a bike locker at work.

    Sent from my C6916 using Tapatalk
    Generally any locking device can be defeated and the point is just to stop the thieves of opportunity. I'm using the skewers of which you speak, as much because I think they look cool! Nice having a locker at work. Wish more places would use these
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    Generally any locking device can be defeated and the point is just to stop the thieves of opportunity. I'm using the skewers of which you speak, as much because I think they look cool! Nice having a locker at work. Wish more places would use these


    There are a number of places where I can also store my bike at work. 😀 Maybe I'm spoiled!

    Sent from my C6916 using Tapatalk

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