Sad Stats and Truck Safety- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,726

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    173
    How does America compare? Men vs woman involving big trucks. Whats the worst city? Sadly I feel the numbers will only increase as cycling becomes more common.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    172
    The US-equivalent would be a truck turning right and it does happen. IIRC a young lady was killed that way about a year ago in CA.

    I have trouble agreeing with the proposed fix of limiting the hours of truck operation but then again I don't live in London. A better solution might be to eliminate the bike lane at intersections, paint the danger-zone red, or dot the bike lane lines to reinforce the notion that vehicles might cross them.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rogbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,255
    This highlights a fundamental design flaw with bike lanes: they encourage filtering into motorists' blind spots. Another issue compounds this, are motorists supposed to cross into a bike lane when making a left (in the UK) or right turn? Here in CO, some bike lanes have dashed striping at intersections indicating that motorists may move into the bike lane to make a turn. However, there is no consistency, even block to block. Combine this with parked vehicle on the inside of a bike lane, and the useable space of a bike lane is only about 1 foot: 4ft wide bike lane, minus three feet for the door zone. The cherry on top, motorists rarely understand that the 3ft law (it's law here) applies to cyclists in a bike lane. Ugh, so much frustration with bike infrastructure and its implementation.

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,341
    Yeah, poor implementation of infrastructure is hard to overcome.

    Here, it's also all over the place how you're supposed to interact at intersections. Sometimes, the bike lane continues all the way to the intersection and any right turn lanes are on the right side of the lane. Motorists have to cross the bike lane to get there, and the bike lane is painted green to indicate that. Sometimes, the bike lane disappears entirely and then sharrows are placed in one of the auto lanes. Sometimes the right turn lane. Sometimes the straight lane. Then the bike lane picks up on the other side of the intersection. On one bike lane near me, the city didn't want to widen a small bridge over a little creek. So the bike lane vanishes, there's one sharrow over the bridge, and then the bike lane starts again on the other side. There are a few bike boxes scattered around the city.

    There are plenty of door zone bike lanes. On a number of routes, the city buses load/unload in the bike lanes, too. Playing hopscotch with a city bus sucks.

    Honestly, though, I have fewer issues with big trucks than I do with school buses. School bus drivers are the worst. One cyclist (a guy), was run over by a school bus a couple years ago. He was in a bike lane, and the school bus right hooked him. I have friends who witnessed the scene afterwards, and said that they knew it was bad when fire trucks were on scene using fire hoses to clean up.

    It's not clear at this point exactly how that situation played out. The school bus driver claimed she didn't see the cyclist. Was that because she wasn't paying attention (which clearly happens), or because the cyclist wasn't respecting the blind spots of the bus (which also clearly happens)?

    I do my best to avoid roads that are frequented by big trucks because the infrastructure really isn't designed to address cyclist/truck conflicts. It's barely designed to address cyclist/automobile conflicts. Sometimes that's not possible, unfortunately. But low speed/low traffic roads in general are way better options if I can get them.

  6. #6
    Loud hubs save lives!
    Reputation: 43st's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    152
    In Montreal this year they've installed bicycle specific stop lights at the larger bike lane intersections. It basically splits the time the turn traffic gets. An amount of time for the cyclist to cross, and then it switches and vehicular traffic can turn (while the giving the red to the cyclist lane). It works a lot better than I expected.

  7. #7
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,341
    Quote Originally Posted by 43st View Post
    In Montreal this year they've installed bicycle specific stop lights at the larger bike lane intersections. It basically splits the time the turn traffic gets. An amount of time for the cyclist to cross, and then it switches and vehicular traffic can turn (while the giving the red to the cyclist lane). It works a lot better than I expected.
    Nice progress in what seems to be consistently rated as the most bicycle-friendly city in North America. I think there are a couple bicycle traffic signals in my city, but none are on routes I regularly take. Bicycle infrastructure here is too inconsistent when it comes down to it.

Similar Threads

  1. X2 battery stats
    By Trophy in forum Lights and Night Riding
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-03-2014, 03:40 PM
  2. Where is AZ on MTB national trail stats?
    By WM-Rider in forum Arizona
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-30-2013, 10:39 PM
  3. My bike Stats
    By jeffscott in forum Commuting
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-14-2011, 12:29 PM
  4. Garmin 800 vs. 705 stats comparison
    By Wherewolf in forum GPS, HRM and Bike Computer
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 03-01-2011, 03:38 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.