Riding in Street Clothes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    jrm
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    Riding in Street Clothes

    After riding in cycling specific clothing for a long time i decided to give riding to work in street cloths.

    first, my twig and berries cant figure out what side of the seat to be on. Oh the discomfort. I started to think that maybe its b/c im wearing boxers and should try tightie whities?

    My pants, are getting stuck on seat and when i get to my destination my pants are hanging off my butt so when i get off the bike i cant walk very well. Then if i wear a belt the thing cuts into my belly.

    Next, I get to work and the shirt im wearing at work is soaked. Just today i began wearing a tie/sweatshirt and shoving the work shirt in the pack.

    Wearing sneakers instead of riding shoes. Theyre comfortable and all but positioning and repositioning my foot over the pedal so that it doesnt hit the chainstay and trying to get my shoe into the gorilla straps at lights both are a major PITA.

    This morning i broke down and rode in wearing baggies with my tie/sweat shirt & tennis shoes get up and except for the shoe thing it felt OK. Maybe i should just go back to wearing cycling clothing again

    Any tips/help Commute Fo? Cheers.

  2. #2
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    I've been using Under Armor compression shorts and a pair of street shorts over it for 2 years now. I average 70 to 80 miles a week this way. I won't ever go back to riding in "lycra". I do need to carry a change of clothes for some things, but not to often. Compression shorts make a huge difference.

  3. #3
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I wear biking clothes. mountain biking baggies, wicking shirt, SPD shoes, and whatever outer layers are necessary due to the weather. I stash the 'outer' work clothes at work and carry the undies and undershirt in the backpack. The main reason street clothes aren't an option this time of year is the fact that they aren't windproof... it was single digits F for me this morning. In the warmer months I don't wear street clothes because of the fit, the funk, and the frustration, just like you mention. If I had a really short commute, maybe I'd consider it.

    At the same time, I don't deck myself out in Lycra for the ride either. Most mountian bike baggies with liner shorts in them, and wicking t-shirt style shirts make you socially acceptable enough that the shoes making an occasional click is the only thing that makes you stand out in the grocery store.
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  4. #4
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    Tie & sweatshirt? Like a necktie?? Pix needed.
    That doesn't sound like too much fun JRM. I ride & stash similarly to CB, but with women's underwear, so I can't comment on that part of your question. Pinned platforms might be easier than your gorilla straps. If you put your foot on them right, it will stick, though some complain they will stick if you put them down the wrong way too.

  5. #5
    namagomi
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    Pants are the problem for me, i wear through normal street pants too quickly. Try to find rip-stop fiber pants. Twig and berries don't seem to care much.

    Street shoes are great for walking around, are you duck footed what is with the chainstay problem? Fat bike?

  6. #6
    Monkey Junkie
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    Depends on the length of the commute for me. I usually try to find a middle ground between cycling and street clothing.

    Compression shorts are decent. I went with some cheaper Reebok ones to try the idea out, and will probably get some Nike or Under Armour ones in the future. I don't necessarily think these are THAT much better than the right pair of boxer briefs, but they don't get wet like cotton which is a major plus especially on hot days. Could always try wool boxer briefs, which I've heard good things about.

    I have a pair of North Face outdoor pants that are water resistant and dry very fast. They are a bit baggy, so keeping the right leg out of the chain is an issue, but they work well overall and could totally be worn all day long in between commuting.

    I usually wear a wicking shirt alone or atleast as a base layer. Mountain Hard Wear makes some nice ones that I've used for a few years. They are thin and never feel damp. I can wear cotton shirts over them and they don't get noticeably damp.

    If I ride platforms then Vans work pretty well. Waffle comb sole grips decently and they are stiff enough to prevent my feet from aching.

    There are however days when I just ride in jeans and whatever shirt I put on, but the longer the commute and the harsher the weather gets the more I need to dress in cycling/outdoor specific gear.

  7. #7
    Ariolimax columbianus
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    i like to wear normal clothes whenever i ride to work (mostly whenever i ride too), one way 10 miles. my commuter has upright bars and a leather saddle (brooks knockoff). wool boxers/sox, wool baselayer, wool mid and outer layers, ibex, smartwool, or pendleton. if it gets colder i add wool kneewarmers/longunderwear. usually i wear a pair a dickies, would like a nice set of wool pants though. flats and vans for me too.

    dress comfortably. i just got back from amsterdam and everyone rides there in their daily clothing. very fancy, wool coats, leather jackets, full on suits w/dress shoes, women in dresses and high heels.....hot. take a tip from the dutch they've got it down.

  8. #8
    weirdo
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    Yeah, what`s the deal with that tie/sweatshirt combo? That does sound crazy!

    I guess everybody`s definition of street clothes is different (tie doesn`t fit in there at all for me), but that`s (street clothes) what I wear almost always. I bought some bicycle diapers last fall (even posted a thread on the matter) and did NOT like them one bit! Next step was a pair of sleek and svelte panties from Wallys, which I now prefer to my BVDs, Jockeys, etc for extra long days in the saddle. But unless I expect uover 50 miles, I don`t even bother with the panties- just the regular Jockey-style underwear that I always wear. I`ve never worn a jersey at all and have done several centuries in just plain clothes.

    Tig and berries issue: I get that when my undies are worn and stretched out, whether I`m on the bike or not. I guess boxers would be like wearing pre-worn out BVDs.

    Pants falling down: I wear shorts most of the year (not cycling shorts), loose fitting synthetic pants when it`s too cold for shorts. When I buy, I try to find the balance between constricting and baggy because too tight don`t cut it, and too baggy, the nose of my saddle tends to snag the crotch when starting from "foot down" stops. I rarely wear a belt and really wouldn`t want to on a bike.

    Sweaty shirt: If you have to wear nice clothes, I guess its best to pack that separately. Not an issue for various reasons, in my case.

    Shoes: Are Gorilla Straps like Power Grips? Yeah, those are a PITA if you have a lot of stops. Clips and straps are, too. If you have a lot of stops, and don`t want clicky pedals, I`d say pinned BMX style pedals.
    Recalculating....

  9. #9
    Beastrider
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    I own absolutely NO spandex/lycra of any kind. I have been 95% car free since 1999. Street clothes are all I wear. Sure, it can be a PITA but it's a lot easier to find decent clothes a lot cheaper than having to get your stuff from a bike shop.....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Tie & sweatshirt? Like a necktie?? Pix needed.
    Still no explanation from the OP on the tie/sweatshirt...hoping it did not get caught in the spokes.

  11. #11
    Beastrider
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Still no explanation from the OP on the tie/sweatshirt...hoping it did not get caught in the spokes.
    Yes...I would like to see a tie with a sweatshirt myself!!!!!
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  12. #12
    Clyde on a mission!
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    I can't really see the point of riding in street clothes unless you're only going a short distance and can't be bothered to change.

    I didn't really believe in "tech clothes" to begin with, except for a pair of bike shorts with padding in the crotch, but since then I've gradually expanded my bike wardrobe as need occurred and it's awesome. No way I'm switching back from my brilliant meshed vented "tech" bike shirt to one of the regular cotton t-shirts I used to wear, the new one transports the sweat away and stays light and cool where the cotton shirts got wet, heavy and soggy.

    I tried using my light Goretex wind breaker shell jacket for riding in the rain - it's a brilliant jacket for everyday wear but it fails miserably when I ride, way too hot and I get boiled. I bought a proper jacket for biking and it is works so much better.

    To sum it up, the clever bike clothes actually works, it keeps you cool and dry, lets the heat out, it just makes your riding experience so much better. I'd much rather include some bits of bike clothes into my everyday street wardrobe than working bits of my street wardrobe into my biking - in fact I already wear some of the tech underwear under my normal street clothes occasionally.

  13. #13
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandrenseren View Post
    I can't really see the point of riding in street clothes unless you're only going a short distance and can't be bothered to change.
    .

    I ride all year long. Rain, snow, sleet, ice, and everything else that comes down the pike.

    I would MUCH prefer to dress for the appropriate weather as I already HAVE all of the stuff in my closet without going to an LBS and paying out the nose for MORE clothes that, frankly, I wouldn't be able to wear anyplace else OTHER than riding a bike.

    Perhaps if they were a little more reasonably priced I would consider them. But 50 bucks and UP for a shirt? No thanks.

    But, in the end, it all comes down to personal preferences. You prefer to ride wearing it and I don't. Whatever makes you more comfortable. As long as you RIDE!!!!! THAT'S what matters!!!!!
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  14. #14
    Clyde on a mission!
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    I agree on dressing for the appropriate weather, it sucks being cold or wet or hot in the wrong outfit - so much more the reason to buy clothes that are properly designed for the task.

    As for price, I buy the anonymous bike clothes without all the fancy brand names, fake sponsor logos and what not and it's actually priced pretty similar to what I pay for street clothes.

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    Our worst weather is typically the middle of summer when it can be over 100f and sometimes over 108f. So I ride using cycling shorts and shirt and use a lightweight backpack for my clothes. Luckily work is casual professional so designer jeans and a nice shirt are just fine. I run clipless, so wear cycling shoes that look like designer sneakers (currently using Specialized) so I don't have to drag shoes to work, just lunch and clothes.

    In the winter, I am a wimp and don't ride in the rain but it doesn't rain much so that's ok. I use fenders to keep street muck off me, as I usually ride in my work pants because it is cooler and the ride is only 5 miles anyway. I always wear a cycling shirt, however. When there is a sale at Performance, I buy whatever I need as I am not a brand snob. They have a really nice bright green shell jacket that is a little heavier than the typical windbreaker, with a high padded neck, that really keeps me warm down to about 42f with a long sleeve cycling shirt underneath. It rarely goes below that, but if it does, I grab my MTB jacket; it has zippers on the sides and arms so I can regulate my core heat and vent if needed. That's also when I grab the winter cycling tights as my knees just ache in that cold. Once it was 36f, I wore sweat pants over the tights and got to work feeling nice and warm.

    I guess I am lucky in a way, being a woman means that there are some things I don't have to contend with if wearing street pants.
    Tzvia.

  16. #16
    Beastrider
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    Here are a couple of photos of what I ride and, for the most part, my attire 99% of the time. I stay rather comfortable and usually don't have a problem with perspiration.


    Winter Wear.....




    Summer Wear.....



    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

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    yea...simply dress appropriate for the weather and circumstance. Folks have been cycling in regular clothes for a century now, lycra on the commute hardly makes the avalance of standard clothing options obsolete or irrelevant. Although I'm with the OP on the boxer shorts situation..One's junk must be managed else the discomfort can truly make a ride misery.

    I'll say this tho..a wind blocking shell is a godsend and very easy to pack!

  18. #18
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moozh View Post
    yea...simply dress appropriate for the weather and circumstance. Folks have been cycling in regular clothes for a century now, lycra on the commute hardly makes the avalance of standard clothing options obsolete or irrelevant. Although I'm with the OP on the boxer shorts situation..One's junk must be managed else the discomfort can truly make a ride misery.

    I'll say this tho..a wind blocking shell is a godsend and very easy to pack!
    I certainly agree with that. The "Twig and Berries" certainly need to be kept in check. I think that every male out there can attest to the fact that it's a nasty feeling to catch something just as you are sitting down.......

    I will add this. The photo below was taken when I was riding a recumbent trike. The air temperature was 26 degrees BELOW zero at the time of the photo. I would rather doubt that there would have been any Lycra/Spandex outfits that would have been able to keep me warm at those temps.

    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  19. #19
    jrm
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    Sorry Tee not Tie

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Tie & sweatshirt? Like a necktie?? Pix needed.
    That doesn't sound like too much fun JRM. I ride & stash similarly to CB, but with women's underwear, so I can't comment on that part of your question. Pinned platforms might be easier than your gorilla straps. If you put your foot on them right, it will stick, though some complain they will stick if you put them down the wrong way too.
    Spell check is my nemesis.

  20. #20
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    I ride 3.5 miles each way to work, and have never put on biking specific clothing...summer or winter. Summer, I at least take my collared shirt off as the not sweat the collar up, but that's about it.

    I need my ride to be longer than it takes for me to get in the proper dress for me to find specific clothes worth it.

  21. #21
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by gearwhine View Post
    I ride 3.5 miles each way to work, and have never put on biking specific clothing...summer or winter. Summer, I at least take my collared shirt off as the not sweat the collar up, but that's about it.

    I need my ride to be longer than it takes for me to get in the proper dress for me to find specific clothes worth it.

    I wear regular clothes. Period. When it's hot I'll put on a pair of shorts. I am not going to delve into the pro/anti-spandex discussion as that's been beat to death.

    Ride wearing whatever you are comfortable in. As long as you RIDE......
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    Sorry Tee not Tie
    Spell check is my nemesis.
    haha That's OK, it kept it interesting!

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    Biz cas for sure
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Quote Originally Posted by BeastRider View Post

    I will add this. The photo below was taken when I was riding a recumbent trike. The air temperature was 26 degrees BELOW zero at the time of the photo. I would rather doubt that there would have been any Lycra/Spandex outfits that would have been able to keep me warm at those temps.
    Sorry but you are entirely wrong on that point.

  25. #25
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Sorry but you are entirely wrong on that point.
    Perhaps as clothing underneath. But in my entire time riding in the winters in Nebraska I never saw anyone wearing any winter wear that was spandex as outer wear.
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  26. #26
    jrm
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    Thanks for the new avatar

    stylin

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeastRider View Post
    Perhaps as clothing underneath. But in my entire time riding in the winters in Nebraska I never saw anyone wearing any winter wear that was spandex as outer wear.
    I certainly do and down to -36 C without the windchill add the windchill and it is close to -50C

  28. #28
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    Cycing in street clothes? That's normal for us Dutch people

    Bicycle Rush Hour Utrecht (Netherlands)

  29. #29
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I ride my bike in regular clothes and I ride in cycling-specific, sometimes even matching, clothes. Where I don't see a point is in some weird compromise. If I'm wearing something weird, I look like a dork. Except when I'm riding like an athlete, then I look like an athlete. I'll just keep telling myself that...

    Anyway, I usually just hop on my bike and ride to wherever I'm going if I'm commuting and it's short. As my commute gets longer, like when I had a job further away during the summer, I start substituting cycling-specific clothes for regular clothes as needed to be comfortable. I used to say that shorts are more important than a jersey, but actually I trade my shirt for a jersey for a shorter commute than what it takes to get me into cycling shorts. Easier to change at the office, and I sweat a lot more around my chest and arm pits. I couldn't have worn a a compromise at the office either, IMO, so why not just commit?

    Another summer, I used to leave pants at the office and ride in in a fresh dress shirt and cycling shorts. Goofy combination too, but it worked at the time.
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  30. #30
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    I favor a base layer of spandex shorts and jersey under street clothes. Tightey whiteys raise saddle sores where blue jean seams coincide with theirs. No such issues with a good chamois short and the 'athletic support" is welcome. Changing out if staying awhile is easy enough. I get more respect in street clothes and I my counts suggest it it real. So the spandex is for warmer temps and longer rides.

    BrianMc

  31. #31
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    I favor a base layer of spandex shorts and jersey under street clothes. Tightey whiteys raise saddle sores where blue jean seams coincide with theirs. No such issues with a good chamois short and the 'athletic support" is welcome. Changing out if staying awhile is easy enough. I get more respect in street clothes and I my counts suggest it it real. So the spandex is for warmer temps and longer rides.

    BrianMc

    I'll still stick to my street clothes. It is, after all, simply semantics. It's not what you WEAR while riding....it's the fact the we RIDE....plain and simple.
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  32. #32
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Jeans??? Dude. I am officially a pansy.

    I had a dentist appt the other day and I left work with only my helmet... no SPD shoes, no gloves, none of the usual clothing swap... and I must admit, it was a wee bit liberating just to jump on the bike and go. But I was only going a mile or so. For the commute, especially in the extremes (it's always either hot or cold, there are only a few days of 'perfect' ) I will always feel the need to change/clean up after the ride in, or wear warmer stuff on the bike than I'll want to wear at work... and if I'm doing that anyway, I might as well wear stuff that's more comfortable on the bike. As far as cost, I never pay retail for bike/outdoor gear. There are deals to be had on everything.
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  33. #33
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    For the warm:
    Skateboard shoes, socks, shorts, t-shirt, helmet, bike specific gloves.

    For the cold:
    Skateboard shoes, ski socks, jeans (roll up the right leg), thermal underwear if it's below 0F, t-shirt, wool sweater, windbreaker, ear muffs, ski gloves, helmet. If it's really, really cold, I'll wear a t-shirt over my head and face, think cornholio.

    My work clothes get rolled up an put in my pack. Shoes and belt I keep at the office.

    I have no problems with bike-specific clothes...they're just too expensive for me.

  34. #34
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    ^^ That brings up a good point...are we talking about riding in the same clothes we work in, or riding in 'bike dedicated' street clothes? I have no problem riding in 'non-bike' clothes, but I'll still change into work clothes when I get to work, and back into the non-bike bike clothes when I leave work. Lots of my bike gear is bike-specific, but some isn't. I'm always on the look-out for stuff that works well on the bike, and I will never pay retail for bike clothes. If I can get good MTB shorts for $20, or 'normal' shorts for $20, and I know I'm primarily going to use them for riding, why not get the bike-specific ones? Retail on them might be $75, which is stupid, but when I find stuff down in the 'normal clothes' price range, I snag it. REI garage sales, geartrade.com, chainlove.com, pricepoint, nashbar, etc...and you're golden. I ride (mountain bike) in 'street' shorts, etc sometimes, when it's comfortable. Bike specific stuff is generally more comfortable and durable.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  35. #35
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    I love how clean my "street clothes" stay when I only wear them in the office, not in the street. No grime, no slush, etc. Don't tell my co-workers, but I can leave pants at work for weeks (not worn every day though) without bringing them home to wash.

    CB, & other bargain hunters, also check out gearscan.com where you can see the current deal from bonktown, steep&cheap, chainlove & whiskeymilitia at once.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I love how clean my "street clothes" stay when I only wear them in the office, not in the street. No grime, no slush, etc. Don't tell my co-workers, but I can leave pants at work for weeks (not worn every day though) without bringing them home to wash.
    Bingo

  37. #37
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    ^^ Absolutely. I feel empowered hearing that comment from a female
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  38. #38
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    Ha ha! You've got the power We need a 2012 work clothes "mileage" thread. Sounds like the competition would be heated.

  39. #39
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    In the crud of winter it is separate riding clothes for me. It's like dressing kids up to go tobogganing.
    Have to remember the restroom break before all the layers are in place!

    I notice the traffic yields to the crazy man on the bike like Moses parting water of the Red Sea. Like I'm a excellent example of a social disease. To quote Sir Elton John.

  40. #40
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Dude. I am officially a pansy.
    Singlespeed pansy? No way! Dude.
    You`re a new breed- the world`s first Pansy Muffin. We`ve always had poppy seed muffins, thanks to you they`re now available in pansy seed version

  41. #41
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Don't tell my co-workers, but I can leave pants at work for weeks (not worn every day though) without bringing them home to wash.
    I get the same benefit, but in the other direction. We have leased uniforms that include laundry service. In the winter, I wear my nylon pants for commutes, wear the uniforms at work, and wear the same pair of jeans at home until my wife gets fed up and throws them in the clothes hamper.

  42. #42
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    I usually wear street clothes when I'm just riding within a few miles. I hate dealing with the hassle of changing. I prefer skate shoes or something similar with a stiffer, flat sole for support. Also, those straps for your pant leg come in clutch, especially if you don't clean your chain like you're supposed to.
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    I have a short commute (right at one mile) and I never have to deal with blazing heat (life at Latitude 62 is pretty cool). But I do have to dress well for work. All of my underwear is boxer briefs or compression shorts; all of either synthetic materials or wool. My undershirts are also synthetic--mostly REI and UnderArmor tees. All socks are wool. If I am going to go tooling around over lunch, I sometimes put on cyclying shorts with a chamois instead of normal underwear.

    Underwear. For a guy, you definitely want something to keep the dangling parts tucked up tight. Cotton anything is going to suck. I liked the idea of wool, but it hasn't held its shape over time. The UnderArmor shorts are definitely leading the pack.

    Pants. I have pretty much created a uniform for myself and adopted one style of pants. I have a drawer full of REI Adventures pants, and also a couple pair of their shorts. They are made of a "peached" nylon fabric, so they have the benefit of not soaking up sweat and rain, while still looking like normal cotton khakis. The newer ones have a gusseted crotch, but even in the older style I never felt any discomfort from the seams. These pants are very functional, but still dressy enough that I can wear them to court.

    Shirts. For work, I haven't found an alternative to the traditional cotton dress shirt. For rides of less than a few miles, it's not a problem. The synthetic undershirt controls sweat enough to not leave me dripping or stinking. But for longer rides, I need something else. Sometimes I just take off the dress shirt, fold it up, and ride in just the undershirt. I also keep a spare dress shirt at the office.

    I'm fortunate to have a nice office where I can easily leave a half-dozen sportcoats hanging up, so I don't have to ride with one. I also keep a suit--complete with shoes and belt--in the closet. But I tend to just drive on the days when I have to wear a suit. The spare is really intended more as insurance in case of a lunchtime accident involving a large bowl of something tomato-based.

    Shoes. I'm not content with my own solution (or lack thereof) on shoes. In winter, flats are fine because I wear insulated boots all the time. But in summer, I would really like to wear SPD-equipped shoes for the longer rides. I recognize, though, that my rides are short and I do a lot more walking. So I have Shimano A530s for pedals (clip on one side, platform on the opposite side) and most days wear normal shoes. I often think of going back to toe clips, which would be better than the platform pedals on the days that I wear regular shoes. But I don't want to switch the pedals every weekend when I go ride. One day, I hope to just have a garage full of bikes to choose from and I can grab one from the mix that is set up just the way I want for that day's ride. But I'm still quite a ways away from that dream.

    I have no opposition to cycling clothing, but I just don't want to have completely separate closet for riding garb. So I buy shirts and other items that work for multiple scenarios. For a day of riding, I'll wear a synthetic camp shirt that handles moisture well. It won't have back pockets like a jersey, but it is clothing that I can wear in other environments and not look funny.

  44. #44
    Monkey Junkie
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    compression shorts

    For those of you that use Under Armour compression shorts, do the legs ride up towards the crotch? I've been riding my Reebok pair and haven't been overwhelmingly satisfied because of the riding up issue. They also just aren't outrageously comfortable in general.

    Been riding without lycra/chamois a lot lately, and I'm considering buying some of the UA or Nike compression shorts.

  45. #45
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I don't see what the point would be. You already have lycra cycling shorts that you know to work well for cycling. Unless you don't mind spending all day in compression shorts but cycling shorts are unacceptable, anyway.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  46. #46
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    Since I live in Texas, and it's really hot here most of the year, I can't wear my work clothes (business casual: slacks, dress shirt, dress shoes) on my 6 miles to work without looking and smelling awful for the rest of the day. So, since I have to change anyways, I usually just wear a short sleeve jersey, padded short liners or lycra cycling shorts/bibs underneath mtb baggies, and then either Vans or my Sidi's, depending on which bike I'm riding that day and therefore which pedals.

    My work has a gym I can use to change and, when arriving to work particular sweaty or dirty, shower. This time of year is nice because I can wear shorts and a short sleeve jersey on my morning commute and not really sweat much at all by the time I get to work. Then I just flushable-wet-wipe my assnballs and wash my face for hygiene's sake and I'm good to go. Keep in mind I shower in the morning before getting on the bike. Being clean before you start your commute helps a lot. In the warmer months, which is to say, most of them, a shower or at least a rinse when I get to work helps clean me off and cool me down (cold showers on hot days ftw).

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I don't see what the point would be. You already have lycra cycling shorts that you know to work well for cycling. Unless you don't mind spending all day in compression shorts but cycling shorts are unacceptable, anyway.
    Have a few pairs of lycra shorts, but at least half of them are on their way out due to so much use. Just considering other alternatives.

    I don't have good facilities to change in at the college I commute to, so whatever I wear is going to be on me for the duration that I'm there plus commuting. I also like taking extra long routes home sometimes. Haven't always had good results with sitting in cycling shorts all day. Will have to bring anti bacterial wipes with me during the hot months just to keep things clean in between. I've had lots of trouble with that since moving to a humid climate. Compression shorts have been less of an issue for this application, but the pair I have still have other issues.

  48. #48
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Tough one. When I had a longer commute, I kept some shoes and a change of pants in my locker. I changed in the bathroom at work.

    I have a very short commute now and don't change. Still use a locker though. I'm back in school and my books are big, heavy, and rarely need to come home.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I love how clean my "street clothes" stay when I only wear them in the office, not in the street. No grime, no slush, etc. Don't tell my co-workers, but I can leave pants at work for weeks (not worn every day though) without bringing them home to wash.
    Exactly!

  50. #50
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    I just started commuting and all I have road in are my work clothes, Firefighter nomex (boxers underneath), and my crew shirts, + a random non-biking jacket depending on the cold...

    Doesn't bother me a bit, but maybe its because I have yet to enjoy the pleasures of a biking outfit...

    Or perhaps, its like my initial issues with my saddle, keep doing it, and your body will adapt.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleAddict View Post
    Have a few pairs of lycra shorts, but at least half of them are on their way out due to so much use. Just considering other alternatives.

    I don't have good facilities to change in at the college I commute to, so whatever I wear is going to be on me for the duration that I'm there plus commuting. I also like taking extra long routes home sometimes. Haven't always had good results with sitting in cycling shorts all day. Will have to bring anti bacterial wipes with me during the hot months just to keep things clean in between. I've had lots of trouble with that since moving to a humid climate. Compression shorts have been less of an issue for this application, but the pair I have still have other issues.
    I have a 10 mile commute each way, have had good results from Starter compression shorts. @ $10 from Wallyworld it's worth a try.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

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