Research Shows Sharrows Shuck- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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  2. #2
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    They do suck. It is not clear to motorists where we should be, where they should be, etc. Share the road signs and sharrows suck. Cyclists may take full lane signs and bike lanes are clearly laid out reducing confusion.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  3. #3
    NDD
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    The unfortunate thing is that, in many states, the laws are clearly laid out as to where the cyclist is supposed to be, but motorists are uninformed for a number of reasons (including the fact that driver's education classes make no mention of how a driver should respond to a cyclist). As a cyclist, I just always assume that people driving have know idea what the laws are, and judging by the way they drive and react to my hand signals - like thinking my left turn signal is me waving them on - I think I am correct in my assumption. What would be a real best solution may not involve any necessary bike infrastructure on low-speed local-traffic roads, but education on how to handle a situation. Bike infrastructure would still be valuable in very high-traffic, high-speed areas, where one shouldn't be limited in transportation ability solely by the method of travel they choose. I see no reason that driver's shouldn't be able to handle a basic traffic situation other than that there is a total lack of education and most people lack the critical thinking and necessary logical capacity to make good decisions at the speed a car is capable of travelling.
    dang

  4. #4
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    Note that all three systems: Bike lanes. sharrows, and nothing decreased the cyclist injuries. That suggests increased bike traffic (encouraged by bike lanes) is a significant factor in bike safety. This is likely by increasing driver awareness and an improved "filter effect" where they can see cyclists because the are actually looking for them. I have found it a lot safer riding recently than eight years ago, and I attribute it to this awareness factor caused by more cyclists.

  5. #5
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    One thing I have noticed adding to the mass confusion is cyclists riding on the sidewalks, against traffic, running reds, etc. This does not help our cause. Motorists get annoyed and pissed at cyclists, and they should. Just like when I get pissed when they do stuff wrong, here are cyclists doing things wrong. Share the road means share the road, the road and the responsibilities of the road.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  6. #6
    NDD
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    Yes, failure of education and inability to follow the rules works on both sides of this. I think as cyclists, when we encounter other cyclists who violate the rules of the road, it is our job to educate them, because some people honestly don't have a clue. On the other hand, there are many who know better and choose not to follow the rules of the road. We should try to change their behavior.

    I am not a good advocate in this last regard. I do not go on organized group rides from the bike shop any more, because I got tired of cyclists in my group running stop signs and red light and behaving like idiots in traffic. I complained to shop employees (head mechanic), and he thanked me and told me they'd be more clear and explicit on proper ride behavior, but I never stuck around to find out. These are your typical roadie types and roadie types don't want to be told anything by a Fred like me.
    dang

  7. #7
    since 4/10/2009
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    Where I live, cyclists are permitted on sidewalks.

    It's also fair to note that there are different types of cyclists. I do not believe that for the cyclist/rider going 3-5mph just cruising along belongs in the street mixed with cars.

    Indianapolis is a pretty major cluster when it comes to road infrastructure, though. in some areas, there are more bike lanes than sidewalks. in some places, there are excellent sidewalks, but the road is SUPER sketch for riding a bike, even if you're really experienced and confident riding in traffic. there's all sorts of stuff all over town. some of the infrastructure is absolutely excellent and functions well for many users. In other places, it doesn't do well for anyone.

    So what all that means is that as a cyclist OR a pedestrian, it can be a major challenge to be 100% predictable. Drivers already aren't very predictable, but they can be if they try, and some do.

  8. #8
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    They could have just asked me.

    Yup sharows mean nothing. All the same rules apply. Confuses motorists and cyclists because the assumption is that different rules must apply if someone went to the effort of painting it on the road.

    Sent from my Altair 8800 using Tapatalk

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