Reliable, budget commuter bike- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 69 of 69
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81

    Reliable, budget commuter bike

    I'm looking for a budget single speed bike that has disc brakes front and back. I would like as little maintenance as possible. I assume I won't significantly benefit from full suspension since I expect to ride it mostly on roads (although those roads may have potholes). The priority is on reliability and low maintenance.

    I am about 6 feet tall.

    I was looking at the Dawes Bullseye and the Gravity G29.

  2. #2
    mtbr Decade+
    Reputation: Biggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,545
    I would also look at the nearest LBS's close to you. See which ones treat you the best and then make a decision on what brands the store(s) you like sell.

    Fit is especially important. My guess is you would be a large with most companies, maybe XL.

    Just as a conversation starter, here is my first suggestion:
    Quick CX 4 - QUICK CX - FITNESS - FITNESS & URBAN - BIKES - 2015
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Biggie View Post
    I would also look at the nearest LBS's close to you. See which ones treat you the best and then make a decision on what brands the store(s) you like sell.

    Fit is especially important. My guess is you would be a large with most companies, maybe XL.

    Just as a conversation starter, here is my first suggestion:
    Quick CX 4 - QUICK CX - FITNESS - FITNESS & URBAN - BIKES - 2015
    It's not a single speed unfortunately.

  4. #4
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,749
    What is your budget? You could roll this and swap the tires out to a more commute friendly tire.

    Trek Rig (Gary Fisher Collection) - Trek Bicycle Superstore
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,626
    Quote Originally Posted by vassock View Post
    It's not a single speed unfortunately.
    Frankly, you won't find a lot of singlespeeds on the market as new bikes. But you know what? Just about ANYTHING can become a singlespeed.

  6. #6
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,749
    I am more inclined to say that you won't find something that is single speed, budget, and has disc brakes. Most road specific bikes are still rim brake, with a few exceptions. Mountain bikes have more of a market for the disc brake. That is why I suggested the Rig that I did.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Texan-n-Fla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    898
    There are tons of single speed disc equipped cyclocross bikes out there that have a decent geometry for commuting, and usually the requirements necessary for fenders and racks.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    If you are looking only at flat bar bikes with discs, a past year Kona Unit might be worth a look. For the difference in price, you might find a geared bike like the Quicks or Scott Aspects and convert it to SS. REI also has a 3 speed IGH Novara for $850, if you just don't want deraileurs.

    I know nothing about hydraulic disc brakes, but for mechanicals, I have been really happy with my bb7s and find the bb5s a little fiddly. Paying a little more up front might be worth it in saved aggravation and replacement parts (unless you are a bike mechanic and have an extensive parts bin).

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    225
    You could get a trek district and have the LBS convert it to single speed. Its in the 600-700 range.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,320
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Just about ANYTHING can become a singlespeed.
    Awww, don't go saying that. Trying to ss a modern, geared bike from a major manufacturer needs a tensioner (which defeats the purpose), an eccentric hub, or a weirdo bb conversion. On old bikes it was easy, but nowadays it's much easier to convert ss to geared than the other way round.

    And on that subject:

    Quote Originally Posted by KentheKona View Post
    You could get a trek district and have the LBS convert it to single speed. Its in the 600-700 range.
    The District used to have sliders, but on the website it looks like all of the new ones are just vertical dropouts?

    My only comments on the Dawes Bullseye and the Gravity G29 are:

    • They're both geared low for the road. If you plan on hitting some trails then you could leave them as-is. But if it's 99% road, then definitely plan to gear up - either a new chainring or even just a 16t rear cog.
    • I would go for the Dawes, because rigid steel is probably nicer than rigid Al

  11. #11
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,626
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Awww, don't go saying that. Trying to ss a modern, geared bike from a major manufacturer needs a tensioner (which defeats the purpose), an eccentric hub, or a weirdo bb conversion. On old bikes it was easy, but nowadays it's much easier to convert ss to geared than the other way round.

    And on that subject:



    The District used to have sliders, but on the website it looks like all of the new ones are just vertical dropouts?

    My only comments on the Dawes Bullseye and the Gravity G29 are:

    • They're both geared low for the road. If you plan on hitting some trails then you could leave them as-is. But if it's 99% road, then definitely plan to gear up - either a new chainring or even just a 16t rear cog.
    • I would go for the Dawes, because rigid steel is probably nicer than rigid Al
    I don't think a tensioner is such a bad thing. I definitely don't think it defeats the purpose. Maybe it's not as mechanically clean as a dropout system that allows you to take up chain slack, but it works. And if we're talking about doing it on a budget, isn't a tensioner more budget-friendly? My first SS used a $30 ebay frame. I spent less than $200 on it, and it was even a trailworthy bike.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,320
    ^ it depends what the goal is.

    If someone already has a bike, and they want to try ss, then a tensioner is fine. Although it's still not exactly cheap, since it's easy to spend $30~40 for a tensioner, cog and spacers (although yeah, you could just use an old derailleur and cassette)

    But if someone is saying that they want a new ss bike, then they're much better off just getting a bike with an ss-able frame. A geared-to-ss conversion should be a last resort.

  13. #13
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
    Reputation: Shayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,721
    I'd take a tensioner over something with sliding dropouts.
    *** --- *** --- ***

  14. #14
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,626
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ it depends what the goal is.

    If someone already has a bike, and they want to try ss, then a tensioner is fine. Although it's still not exactly cheap, since it's easy to spend $30~40 for a tensioner, cog and spacers (although yeah, you could just use an old derailleur and cassette)

    But if someone is saying that they want a new ss bike, then they're much better off just getting a bike with an ss-able frame. A geared-to-ss conversion should be a last resort.
    Like I said, I built a singlespeed on a college student budget for about $200. Sold it several years later at a profit, actually. The supply of ss-able frames on the market is fairly limited. Horizontal track ends, IMO, are $hit when you're talking about disc brakes, too, so that eliminates a lot of the "options". I've never used a bike with sliders, or swingers, or any of the newer drops meant to tension chains, so I can't comment on them. But they at least seem like much better choices than track ends with disc brakes.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,320
    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne View Post
    I'd take a tensioner over something with sliding dropouts.
    Sliding dropouts, or trackends like Harold mentioned? Because sliding dropouts work just fine.

    If someone wants a ss frame their options are:

    • sliding dropouts
    • swinging dropouts
    • ebb
    • trackends
    • old-school horizontal dropouts (which you'd probably never find with discs)


    I think that's it?

    And of that list, I think most people would take sliders/swingers over any of the others (especially with discs). Personally, I've had all of them except for swingers.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    318
    Find a SSCX bike. For a cheap commuter check bikes direct. Bet they have something sub-500 that would be perfect

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Awww, don't go saying that. Trying to ss a modern, geared bike from a major manufacturer needs a tensioner (which defeats the purpose), an eccentric hub, or a weirdo bb conversion. On old bikes it was easy, but nowadays it's much easier to convert ss to geared than the other way round.

    And on that subject:



    The District used to have sliders, but on the website it looks like all of the new ones are just vertical dropouts?

    My only comments on the Dawes Bullseye and the Gravity G29 are:

    • They're both geared low for the road. If you plan on hitting some trails then you could leave them as-is. But if it's 99% road, then definitely plan to gear up - either a new chainring or even just a 16t rear cog.
    • I would go for the Dawes, because rigid steel is probably nicer than rigid Al
    I think I remember reading somewhere, perhaps even on this forum, that the Gravity had slightly better components, but I'm open to suggestions. Perhaps I should visit an LBS before I make the decision.

    That said, the bike does not have to be brand new. I don't mind getting a used one.

    The Trek bike mentioned above is on the other side of the country from me and is local pick up only.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,320
    ^ I didn't realize that the Dawes doesn't actually come with discs, and that you'd have to add them. For that reason alone you'd probably be better with the Gravity. And it looks like the Gravity does have better wheels and headset.

    Although as Rustedthrough mentions, if you could find a deal on a yearold Kona Unit it would be a genuinely great bike (but probably 2x the price of the others)

  19. #19
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,749
    OP needs to reply with budget and we can all go from there. A budget to some means under $100, or under $5000 to others.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    Some good points made above.

    For frame of reference, I paid right around $800 for my new (old stock) 2014 Unit about two months ago. The stock tires were good enough that I could have had the LBS swap them out at purchase for something more roadworthy, or at least a deep discount on some big slicks.

    A quick stop in your local bike shops will likely be time well spent, you might even find some great older bikes that have been traded in, or old stock at the distributor.
    Last edited by Rustedthrough; 02-17-2015 at 10:55 PM. Reason: forgot details

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    OP needs to reply with budget and we can all go from there. A budget to some means under $100, or under $5000 to others.
    I'm looking for something around $500 or less.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    498
    Another LBS option is the Redline Monocog. Last year's model should be $5-600

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    826
    if you know what you're looking for and willing to search and wait, used is the way to go. Got a two year old Kona Unit with a nice aftermarket air fork (not necessary for commute but nice on the trails) for 450. Only thing I've spent money on is tires, a fresh chain, and new chainring/cog so I could play with different gearing. This also depends where you live and how popular biking is there.

  24. #24
    jrm
    jrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jrm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,322
    I suggest building your own b/c you wont be happy with what $500 will afford. I built my current pompino, sans disc brakes, for less than that. Great bike.

    case in point everything but wheels, brakes and levers for $274...
    On-One Pompino V4 Steel Pick 'n' Mix Bundle | Planet X
    Last edited by jrm; 02-20-2015 at 02:45 PM.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    Nashbar has a 29er and a 650b both on sale with discs and single speed.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    75
    Raleigh furley under 500 new and a real nice frame. Disk and room for 40mm tires

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Texan-n-Fla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    898
    Furley is an awesome ride.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  28. #28
    jrm
    jrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jrm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,322
    Agreed the Furley. An EBB and 135mm rear spacing really widens the opportunities. Anyone know how much they weigh? edit: around ~25lbs~
    Last edited by jrm; 02-23-2015 at 11:30 AM.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    75
    Reliable, budget commuter bike-image.jpgI have my ten speed tripper to 20.8 lbs same bike but with carbon fork, ironcross wheels and shadow 10 zee ten speed setup (it came with nexus three speed which I want to sell or trade that wheel set , the furley is same exact bike with drop bars and single speed so I would guess low 24lbs. I never measures mine before I started switching parts. The frame is cromoly. There was very little rode vibrations when I first got it now there virtually none and is the most comfortable bike I've ever owned but not sure about the ergon seat yet.

  30. #30
    Born With A Tail
    Reputation: M-Train's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    238
    Check out All-City Cycles. Mine is geared and has canti-brakes, but they have plenty of options and they are nice looking and nice riding rigs.
    Tequila tonight, tomorrow we ride!

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    826
    this is a thing of beauty...wouldn't be surprised if it surpasses your budget though. I'm seriously considering buying it and selling my Unit...

    Van Dessel WTF | eBay

  32. #32
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,626
    Quote Originally Posted by jmctav23 View Post
    this is a thing of beauty...wouldn't be surprised if it surpasses your budget though. I'm seriously considering buying it and selling my Unit...

    Van Dessel WTF | eBay
    dude that's just teasing

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    75
    That's my frame choice also (just was researching it allitle because I like the style)may be this summer but would like to find one similair in titanium and put dropper seat on ( would help make it my perfect bike with 2.00 tires and sell everything else)I like the lower stand over height. I do a lot of old logging and trail that get allittle rough and with my build 5"9 with 30 inch Inseem,I am still almost sitting on bar riding on some steep downhill single tracks i shouldn't be on but there on the way. The nice thing with the raleigh is the bb height it's clears a lot but I sacrife stand over height and just abit of toe overlap(just barely spds. I do like cross bike because there easy to carry and simple.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    Nashbar has a 29er and a 650b both on sale with discs and single speed.
    Nashbar Single-Speed 29er Mountain Bike sells for $375. How does that compare to the Gravity?

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    The Nashbar and Gravity bikes look to have very similar specs, no braze -ons for racks or fenders, same disc brakes etc. Someone else might know geometry.

  36. #36
    jrm
    jrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jrm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,322
    Quote Originally Posted by jmctav23 View Post
    this is a thing of beauty...wouldn't be surprised if it surpasses your budget though. I'm seriously considering buying it and selling my Unit...

    Van Dessel WTF | eBay
    I came close to buying one of those but figured that i didnt need to spend the $$$ when my swobo crosby is running fine.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    30
    Charge plug performance exclusive 2015
    $599

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    The Nashbar and Gravity bikes look to have very similar specs, no braze -ons for racks or fenders, same disc brakes etc. Someone else might know geometry.
    So it is impossible to install load-bearing equipment on those bikes?

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    Not impossible. Several companies make QR mounted racks, and Thule makes a rack which mounts to the seat stays. P- clamp conversions of standard racks might work as well.

    My Unit has a steerer tube mounted front fender and a rack mounted rear fender, with the rear rack mounted at the skewer, it all works well- it just takes some fiddling around.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    Not impossible. Several companies make QR mounted racks, and Thule makes a rack which mounts to the seat stays. P- clamp conversions of standard racks might work as well.

    My Unit has a steerer tube mounted front fender and a rack mounted rear fender, with the rear rack mounted at the skewer, it all works well- it just takes some fiddling around.
    So if I got the G29 and wanted a cargo rack in the rear, what option is most reliable? I heard the seat post racks tend to twist on the seatpost.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    Blackburn makes a solid rack that mounts on the skewers, I would guess that there are several others out there for disc 29ers. The Thule rack is pretty sexy, and pretty pricey, but is the only one I have seen that mounts on the seat stays rather than the QRs or braze- ons.

    Newfangled and others have mounted standard rear racks with "P- clamps" on the seat stays. Take a look at another thread here, commuting- best rear rack without braze- ons.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    Blackburn makes a solid rack that mounts on the skewers, I would guess that there are several others out there for disc 29ers. The Thule rack is pretty sexy, and pretty pricey, but is the only one I have seen that mounts on the seat stays rather than the QRs or braze- ons.

    Newfangled and others have mounted standard rear racks with "P- clamps" on the seat stays. Take a look at another thread here, commuting- best rear rack without braze- ons.
    Any specific links to compatible items? I don't care how it looks. Just has to be practical. I was considering getting a seatpost rack and gluing it to the seatpost with JB weld to keep it from turning.

    What about this item? http://www.amazon.com/Outtag-Retract.../dp/B00MR0PIGW

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    Quote Originally Posted by vassock View Post
    Any specific links to compatible items? I don't care how it looks. Just has to be practical. I was considering getting a seatpost rack and gluing it to the seatpost with JB weld to keep it from turning.
    Good Lord, please don't do that. I love JB Weld, but, that is a bad idea.

    You could start by looking at this:
    Streamliner 29er DLX - Streamliner Racks - Racks - Products - Axiom Performance Gear

    and then look at this:
    EX-1 DISC RACK - Rear Racks - Racks

    and this:
    Thule Pack ?n Pedal Tour Rack - Thule

    There are several good options out there, epoxying a seat post rack should be a last resort.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    Good Lord, please don't do that. I love JB Weld, but, that is a bad idea.

    You could start by looking at this:
    Streamliner 29er DLX - Streamliner Racks - Racks - Products - Axiom Performance Gear

    and then look at this:
    EX-1 DISC RACK - Rear Racks - Racks

    and this:
    Thule Pack ?n Pedal Tour Rack - Thule

    There are several good options out there, epoxying a seat post rack should be a last resort.
    Those seem complicated to mount. Any instructional videos for those particular product types?

    The epoxy would just be at the rack mounting point just to keep it from turning on the smooth seat post pole. I also read about people putting a piece of hard rubber at the mounting point and overtightening the bolts of the rack on the post to keep it from turning and avoiding damage to the seatpost.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    Mounting each of these is indeed slightly more complex than brushing your teeth.

    A strip of old inner tube or other rubber bushing might do well to keep a seat post rack tight and straight, if you keep the loads light enough.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Okay, I'm convinced.

    Amazon.com : Axiom DLX Streamliner Disc Cycle Rack, Black : Bike Racks : Sports & Outdoors : $37.05

    Bike choices:

    Redline Monocog 29er Mountain Bike 17 in Single Speed with Upgraded Disc Brakes | eBay - $420.00 (used)

    vs

    Brand new G29: $349.95

    I think the G29 makes more sense for the money. Is the monocog really so much more reliable and long-lasting to make the price difference worth it?

    I'll also be getting 2 small flashlights with rechargeable batteries to use so I can ride at night. Cheapest way seems to be with a magnetic mounting system and a waterproof flashlight. Is there a better solution?

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by vassock View Post
    Okay, I'm convinced.

    Amazon.com : Axiom DLX Streamliner Disc Cycle Rack, Black : Bike Racks : Sports & Outdoors : $37.05

    Bike choices:

    Redline Monocog 29er Mountain Bike 17 in Single Speed with Upgraded Disc Brakes | eBay - $420.00 (used)

    vs

    Brand new G29: $349.95

    I think the G29 makes more sense for the money. Is the monocog really so much more reliable and long-lasting to make the price difference worth it?

    I'll also be getting 2 small flashlights with rechargeable batteries to use so I can ride at night. Cheapest way seems to be with a magnetic mounting system and a waterproof flashlight. Is there a better solution?
    Can anyone confirm/deny compatibility of the bike rack Axiom DLX and Gravity G29 bike?

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Texan-n-Fla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    898
    Nope... But I don't see why it wouldn't work.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: newfangled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,320
    ^ I've got the 29er streamliner on my 29er, and I think that's a better bet. Not sure why amazon doesn't have it (almost nobody online seems to), but I got an lbs to order it in without any issue.

    The dlx is an inch shorter than the 29er version, and even with the 29er version the clearances aren't huge:


  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ I've got the 29er streamliner on my 29er, and I think that's a better bet. Not sure why amazon doesn't have it (almost nobody online seems to), but I got an lbs to order it in without any issue.

    The dlx is an inch shorter than the 29er version, and even with the 29er version the clearances aren't huge:
    LBS doesn't have the 29er version available (in stock or otherwise). Are you sure the G29 doesn't have the mounting points on the rear part of the frame? I see there are little metal bolts there on the image. Could you check again?

    https://www.bikesdirect.com/products...black_2100.jpg

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Okay, I did the measurements. 6'0 tall and about a 32" inseam. For MTB it looks like

    5'11" - 6'2" 31" - 33" 19 to 21 inches, so I will get the 21 inch Gravity G29.

    What color is best? Orange, white or black?

    Also, I assume the bike for $350 from bikes direct is the whole bike with wheels, forks, discs and chain, correct?

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Texan-n-Fla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    898
    Yes. I'd go for orange simply for visibility.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Texan-n-Fla View Post
    Yes. I'd go for orange simply for visibility.
    That's what I was thinking.

    What about riding at night?

    Amazon.com : Abco Tech LED Bike Light - Exquisite Design - Headlight and Tail Light Set - Multipurpose High Intensity Triple Mode Front and Tail Waterproof Bike Light - Adjustable Focus Zoom Light - No Tools Needed - Quick Release Mount - Great for S

    Is that a good choice? Looks like it has front and rear lights.

    My state requires a white light in front and a red light in rear visible 500+ feet away.

    Also I need a bell that is audible 100+ feet away. Any suggestions?

    http://www.amazon.com/CARCHETŪ-Bicyc.../dp/B00AQAR426

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Texan-n-Fla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    898
    Any bell will work. As for lights, I suggest visiting your lbs. You're able to get your hands on things and see what's up. I've found that for cheap Chinese lights from Amazon.com, you get what you pay for.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    For riding at night you might start by looking at something like this:
    http://www.amazon.com/Metro-360-Hots...words=cygolite
    Several manufacturers sell similar starter kits for similar prices. If you buy it from the LBS you may get more help in the warranty department if you need it.

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    That seems a bit too expensive.

  57. #57

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Texan-n-Fla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    898
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00C2M...=AC_SY200_QL40

    I had one of these for a while. Good output and price conscious. The warranty means nothing, however. Just keep that in mind, but if you're looking for a good start to help you understand what you want, what you need, and what direction you need to go, this is it.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Texan-n-Fla View Post
    SecurityIng Waterproof 2800 Lumens XM-L U2 LED Bicycle Light 4 Modes Super Bright Lighting Lamp Bike Lamp Headlight with 8.4V Rechargeable Battery Pack and Charger for Camping, Cycling, Hiking, Riding - Black:Amazon:Sports & Outdoors

    I had one of these for a while. Good output and price conscious. The warranty means nothing, however. Just keep that in mind, but if you're looking for a good start to help you understand what you want, what you need, and what direction you need to go, this is it.
    Does it come with a red tail light?
    Amazon.com : MetroFlash Nocturna USB Rechargeable Taillight with USB Cable : Bike Headlight Taillight Combinations : Sports & Outdoors

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    Do you just need to be seen, or do you need the light to see the road?

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    Do you just need to be seen, or do you need the light to see the road?
    It would help if the headlight helped me see potholes, yes.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Texan-n-Fla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    898
    No, you would have to buy a taillight. But honestly, you're kinda putting a price on your life.
    Bourbon: Because no good story ever started with "So, there we were eating salads".

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    I run two sets of these, plus a bright usb chargeable set (or two of them) like the ones I mentioned above.

    http://www.amazon.com/Planet-Bike-Bl...et+bike+blinky

    Combined with a headlight, these would meet the legal requirements and give you some idea of what you need for night riding. Lights, like brakes, are not good place to skimp.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    I run two sets of these, plus a bright usb chargeable set (or two of them) like the ones I mentioned above.

    Amazon.com : Planet Bike Blinky Safety 1-Led Bicycle Light Set : Bike Headlight Taillight Combinations : Sports & Outdoors

    Combined with a headlight, these would meet the legal requirements and give you some idea of what you need for night riding. Lights, like brakes, are not good place to skimp.
    What's the point of putting an extra bulb in the front if there is already a headlight there? The headlight will be stronger than this, let people see you, and let you see the road. Not a bad idea for the rear, but in the front it would be redundant.

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    The point is having lights where they will be seen. I have the white blinkies mounted on my fork and my headlight mounted on the handlebar. The red blinkies are on my rack, while the brighter "breathing" taillights are on my seatpost.

    As much as Cygolite and Light and Motion have made their headlights visible from the side, my arms and mitts limit that function. The cheap lights mounted on the fork never get hidden and give me some level of visibility from the side.

    Redundancy is our friend.

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    439
    BrianMC has posted a number of videos to this forum which show the relative advantage of lights in different locations and of varying brightness.

  67. #67
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,749
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    For riding at night you might start by looking at something like this:
    Amazon.com : Cygolite Metro 360/Hotshot 2W Combo Light Set : Bike Headlight Taillight Combinations : Sports & Outdoors
    Several manufacturers sell similar starter kits for similar prices. If you buy it from the LBS you may get more help in the warranty department if you need it.
    Both of those lights are really good. My buddy runs that combo and it is well worth the money. I have a Cygolite Dash 320 that I have been using up front and I am extremely happy with it. As said before, you are putting a price on your life.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    824
    The Dash 320 and HotShot Micro combo is a bit cheaper at $70 Amazon.com : Cygolite Dash 320/Hotshot Micro USB Light Combo : Sports & Outdoors

    Would be hard to get something cheaper while still being bright enough to see and be reliable.

  69. #69
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,749
    ^ this is the combo that I run, and I really like it. Both lights have great battery life so far. I like the visibility of the tail, and the headlight, to be seen, and to see. 320 lumens is just enough for a dark MUP in the middle of the night.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-16-2015, 07:20 AM
  2. Below budget downhill bike | reliable
    By Norcorider13 in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-02-2014, 10:09 AM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-09-2012, 12:09 AM
  4. Budget Crossover/Hybrid/Commuter bike
    By dosland in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-30-2011, 06:32 AM
  5. Budget Crankset advice for commuter
    By CabezaShok in forum Commuting
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-02-2011, 04:34 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.