Rear rack for Lemond Poprad- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Rear rack for Lemond Poprad

    Hey everyone,

    Got any suggestions for a rear rack that would go on a 2008 lemond poprad? This bike unfortunately does not have eyelets on the seat stays. There are eyelets lower on the frame however (by the skewer). Maximum weight I would be carrying is 20lbs.

    Any suggestions? I like the old mountain man but just can't afford it. I'd like to keep this purchase under $50 if possible.

  2. #2
    weirdo
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    No problem. The bosses you have by the skewer are what holds up the weight. You can just use rubberized P-clamps for the top brace- all it does is keep the rack from tipping forward or back. Any cheapo rack that`ll take the weight should do the trick for you.

  3. #3
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    I've done fine with pretty much whatever rack. I think I have a cheap Blackburn right now.

    On my last bike, I had the rack attached to the chainstay arch for a while, since it didn't have braze-ons on the chainstays. That worked okay, and I assumed it would be better to use a bolted connection like that than P-clamps, but one day, for whatever reason, I decided to try two stays, to the chainstays, with P-clamps. I found that to work better - a lot less "wag the dog."
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    Cool, thanks guys. And any bag should be compatible with rack?

  5. #5
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    Actually, bags can be a real pain in the ass. It's not just about the rack. It's also about your bike's chainstay length and the size of your feet.

    It shouldn't be too hard to find a workable combination on your Poprad, since 'cross bikes have to have longish chainstays to make fat tires clear. Just make sure you're looking at something that's supposed to go on a rear rack and buy from a store with a return policy, or locally. Along with the bag itself, you should pay attention to the attachment hardware. Some have pretty crappy stuff.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    i was actually going to splurge on the bag and try to go ortlieb or something just as nice. Was looking at the ortlieb downtown pannier because the need to keep it prof. looking when I walk in the office.

    any suggestions on the bag? I've asked on the forums before, a while back, but would love to hear more opinions here. Need to hold a 15'' laptop, change of clothes and small sack lunch and a lock.

  7. #7
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    Certainly Ortlieb is the standard by which other bags are judged. And they do have nice attachment hardware.

    I have Seattle Sports Titan panniers. Much cheaper, and pretty secure. But they definitely look like something that belongs on the side of a bike.

    Do a little reading around and decide if you think the laptop is a good idea to put in the pannier.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    How else do people carry their laptops? I've got a 32 mile round trip commute.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Messenger bag, backpack.

    It would be annoying for a ride that long. But think about all the crap you carry with you to and from work, or when you're just out for a ride. If you pare it down to just the laptop, not even its power supply, in a bag and put everything else in your pannier, it's not nearly as bad as if you add a laptop and power supply to an already heavy messenger bag.

    Do some research on it yourself, too. I've got a pretty short commute and I don't take my laptop with me, in general. So it's not something I've researched in a while. The major fear is damage to the hard drive, with its small and somewhat delicate moving parts. So another option is a laptop with a solid state drive, a cheap laptop, a laptop you don't own, etc.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    Well I just picked up the Topeak explorer rack. I'm interested now in the Seattle Sports Titan. I plan on carrying my lap top in a back pack, and everything else in that. How easy is it to mount on the rack and take off? Is there any kind of shoulder strap or handle to use when carrying it off the bike?

  11. #11
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    There's a handle, but it's not brilliant. No shoulder strap. For me, it's a waterproof pannier that's good at being a pannier. If you want that and a richer feature set, you need to pay more. I think I got the set for $60 or so.

    The attachment system has been great. There are two hooks on the top that fit over the rack rail. They've been secure. There's another hook on the bottom that fits over a stay. It's not so secure, but I figured out a way to place the bag on the rack that worked fine. I'd had a pannier that used a hook on a cinch strap, and I found I had a really hard time getting it on and off the bike, so this was a big improvement.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    Just tried to install the rack and the bolts seem a tiny bit small. The fit, but I feel like i'm really forcing it, so therefore, I decided to not push it and wanted to ask you guys... Do I need a smaller screw?

  13. #13
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    Try them without the rack - just bolt straight into the dropout. Sometimes having the rack stay there makes it hard to get everything lined up nicely.

    TBH, I have no idea what size those are supposed to be. It "seems" to be standard - the bolts that come with racks have always fit okay.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    I did that and it still was pretty tough to get in. I don't want to strip the threads. It does look like there is some paint in there. Should I try to remove that, and if so, how?

  15. #15
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I bet the paint's your problem.

    If you're confident that the screw's the right size, just screw it in. They're probably hard enough to chase the threads.

    If you're worried about it, get your shop to look at it. I'm just some guy on the Internet.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Ok, I believe it was a combination of paint, road grime and a little corrosion, but I got the two lower bolts in.

    My next issue is the top of the rack sits very close to the seat stays (and I'm using P-clamps because there are not eyelets on the seat stays of my bike). Any tips on bending those silver bars (that come with the topeak explorer) or where to mount the p-clamps... both so its sturdy and doesn't look like crap?

  17. #17
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    Glad you got the bolts in, and I didn't advise you to strip your threads in the process!

    For rigidity, I think that putting the P-clamps wherever it makes the bridging section of bar shortest would be the best. It's not going to make a huge difference, though.

    For looks, up to you... but I think adding fewer different lines and angles to the bike is one good approach. So if leaving them straight works, maybe that.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    Those little metal bars are adjustable (underneath the rack) so you can get the length just how you like it.

    I carry my laptop in my pannier once every two weeks or so. I have been doing it for a the last four years on my 36m RT commute. I just put it in a little rubber sleeve for padding.

  19. #19
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    Don't know if this helps, but I bent my Topeak explorer straps in a vice to suit the seat stay bosses. You can do similar to match the P-clips.

    If the length of the straps are too long to suit, you can cut them down with Gilbows or junior hacksaw, punch or drill new holes as required. On one bike I turned the P-clips around so that the bolt and nut were on the front side of the seat stays rather than on the rear side. This made the rear rack easier to level.


  20. #20
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    well I found that my p-clamps just are not big enough... I'm pretty sure if I pick up something a little bigger it will be easier to install. I just can't get the bolt through the small p-clamp and the topeak strap.

    By the way, (even though I'm still using just a backpack) I had my 3rd commute to work today. 16 miles one way. I love it. I hope to build up to do it 3-5 times a week.

  21. #21
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    Oops! Maybe bring in the bike this time. Unless I'm very sure of something, I try to do that.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  22. #22
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    well I found that my p-clamps just are not big enough... I'm pretty sure if I pick up something a little bigger it will be easier to install. I just can't get the bolt through the small p-clamp and the topeak strap.

    By the way, (even though I'm still using just a backpack) I had my 3rd commute to work today. 16 miles one way. I love it. I hope to build up to do it 3-5 times a week.
    Aw, man! I hope you found them locally, so you don`t have to wait for new ones to show up. Glad you`re digging the commute though, and congrats on the first three days. Getting rid of the backpack will make it more pleasant.

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