Raised Crosswalks aka Curb Bump-Outs?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Raised Crosswalks aka Curb Bump-Outs?

    Our Main Street is currently all dug up for a big reconstruction. The picture below is an artist's rendition of the end product. I'm a little concerned about those raised crosswalks that stick out into the street, imagining cyclists slamming into the curbing and going over the bars, or diving into traffic at the last minute to avoid the obstacle.

    I emailed the contact on the website to see if they were actually going to be raised curbing or if it just looks like it in the drawing. I got a reply the same day: "Where you see curb "bump-outs" for pedestrian crossing, the curb is above road grade. It does taper down to meet the ramp areas. The areas along the curb on either side of the "bump-outs" are for parking. Bicycles are to travel along with traffic. There is not a bike path in the design."

    What do you think? Does your town have these bump-outs? The speed limit is only 25, so taking the lane is OK, but many casual cyclists tend not to do that. Also, I used to be able to pass backed up cars on the right, especially in the a.m. when businesses were not open and no cars were parked at the curb.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Raised Crosswalks aka Curb Bump-Outs?-digbarre.jpg  


  2. #2
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    These are showing up all over Anchorage with every remodel of the roads. They SUCK! You go from having a bike lane to NOTHING, back to have a lane again. You have to merge into traffic and the cagers HATE it. My neighborhood road has been tore up all summer and they are installing 2 of these narrow passages as they rebuild. One in front of the school which has a x-walk, the other in front of my road. They seem to slow cars down, making folks pay attention? Also creates a bottle-neck so peds have to cross in designated areas instead of jay-walking?

  3. #3
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    Set up toi kill bikers....so cars slow down and don't kill them...

    Idiocy

  4. #4
    CB of the East
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    They added one in an area I occasionally ride in and they seem like a stupid idea. Ours goes from being a bike path to a bump out and then back to a bike path. It seems like and asinine design. I'm sitting on on some bike-ped planning meetings in town to weigh in from a biker's POV.

  5. #5
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    We've got them all over the place.

    I've posted these photos before, but this is what you end up with:

    from The Charrette Blog Archive Abandonment Issues on the 76 Avenue and 106 Street Bike Lanes

    That bump-out has been there for years, and then the city came along and added the poorly thoughtout bikelane much later. But with or without the bikelane, it obviously affects the line that you choose when riding.

    They're particularly bad in the winter. Snow and gravel pile up around them which reduces the effective width of the lane even more. They also become a icy/slushy/rocky speedbump of unpredictability.

  6. #6
    jrm
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    A bulb-out with a bike lane

    is really a shitty design for all, if not more of the examples you guys are giving. If there isn;t a parallel bike lane then the lane should be converted to a signed or unsigned route. We have um on a number of streets and as a part time pedestrian they work pretty well for slowing traffic when your trying to cross.

    Ill agree that riding around these things is a ***** sometimes. Especially when your surrounded by a bunch of cagers eager to get home on a friday afternoon. You just have to be ready to take the lane. I stick my hand at about a 45 degree angle to signal that im merging into the travel-way. Or if traffics bad news ill just ride side streets home and relax.

    NP: Matthew Dear "Her Fantasy" (Poolside remix)

  7. #7
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    We have those bumpouts but they are only in parking areas not travel lanes. So people who hate them do so not because they take travel lanes, but because they eat parking spots.

  8. #8
    weirdo
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    Yeah, pretty stupid. There`s a mile long stretch near my folks` house with a couple of those things on each block. I`m glad I don`t often ride that street.

  9. #9
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I hate them in concept, but I'd ride the MTB more often and work on my manuals. Make lemonade...
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  10. #10
    since 4/10/2009
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    since in this case, the space between bump-outs is for parking and not bike lanes, I'd be a little bit less concerned.

    my town's on-street parking does something similar, except the parking is angle-in and not parallel. speed limit in my town is actually 20mph, so I'm riding with traffic the whole time, anyway. I just take the lane so I can avoid the people trying to back out (there is parallel parking in other parts of downtown, so I avoid getting doored, too).

    one big difference is that my town has a LOT more space in the lane. while there's technically only markings for one lane each way, most of the intersections have enough space for people to drive around someone wanting to turn off. there are places where I can ride far enough to the right for people to pass if they want, and still avoid parking cars.

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the input, everyone, I appreciate it. I have a infinitesimal sliver of hope that the design can still be changed before the project is done, but it will take more than me complaining. I posted the pic on the VT Bike-Ped Coalition FB page to see if anyone else is concerned. But perhaps a coalition with the snowplowers and the businesses losing street parking would be more effective, given the number of cyclists I see.

  12. #12
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    They're actually called bulb-outs or curb extensions. They are used to reduce the distance the pedestrians must cross in the street, increase visibility, and slow automotive traffic by narrowing the street. At corners, the turning radius becomes smaller so vehicles are forced to negotiate the turn at a lower speed which is beneficial for pedestrian safety.

    In SF at least, bike lanes generally are not disrupted by the bulb-outs, but in the above photos, I do see some badly designed bulb-outs.

    In the rendering, the artist may have left out the parked vehicles, in which case, the bulb-out is a non-issue.

    Here is what a well thought out one looks like: Google Maps

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