• 04-30-2008
    bworks
    post / trunk rack for laptop?
    Just started commuting and have been using a backpack. I use my 29er singlespeed mtb that I have an extra set of wheels with commuter tires on. I like to be able to swap things out quickly for off-road goodness. For that reason.. I don't want to go with a full rack and panniers. I was wondering if there are any seat-post mounted rear racks with a setup that I could carry a loptop (Macbook) and few other small stuff in? I'd like to ditch the backpack but want to keep it simple....
  • 05-01-2008
    Squash
    Hmmm....
    That's a toughy as most seatpost mounted racks aren't really wide enough to accomodate a laptop, and most "trunk bags" that go with them aren't large enough either. That and most seatpost mounted racks are limited to a 25lb max load. Not likely you'd exceed that, but something to consider. But they do mount and dismount faster and easier than pannier racks. Another consideration is a seatpost rack noticeably raises the center of gravity of the bike. You can get used to it, but it is a bit disconcerting at first. I think your best option in this case is going to be to go with the seatpost rack and continue to use the back pack to contain the laptop and additional items and secure it to the rack. They do make short nylon and elastic bungie cords for this purpose and they work quite well. Just one word of caution. A seatpost rack is attached directly to the seatpost (obviously) which is in turn attached directly to the seat tube (again obiously) and hence the rest of the frame. So all vibration and impact forces are transmitted directly through the frame to the rack. This can be compensated for to some extent through the use of padding. But keep in mind that every pothole or bump that your butt takes, so will your laptop. While modern laptops will take quite a bit of abuse, they're not designed for a steady diet of it. If your commute route is nice and smooth no problem, but rough roads etc. could eventually lead to system problems. So you may be better off, for your laptop's sake, to continue the use of the back pack. It just depends.

    Anyway, there are plenty of seatpost racks out there, and most of them would likely work fine. Just don't try to use a pannier type bag on a seatpost mounted rack. The pannier requires a vertical support behind it to keep it out of the wheels. That route leads to disaster! Unfortunately there are no specific setups that I know of, when it comes to seapost mounted racks, that would or are designed specifically to accomodate a laptop. Perhaps somebody else out there knows of something.

    Good Dirt
  • 05-01-2008
    wheelbender6
    I made a wide frame from PVC pipe and screwed it to my rack to carry multiple pizzas. I use sleeping bag straps instead of bungees. A beefed up version of my pizza rack should work for the laptop.
  • 05-03-2008
    bworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wheelbender6
    I made a wide frame from PVC pipe and screwed it to my rack to carry multiple pizzas. I use sleeping bag straps instead of bungees. A beefed up version of my pizza rack should work for the laptop.

    ANY PICS?
  • 05-03-2008
    sjhiker
    laptop compatible panier
    I googled a bit and found Arkel makes some bags which appear to be more laptop friendly than your average panier (which are good for carrying your lunch or a frisbee).


    http://www.arkel-od.com/panniers/urban.asp

    Some look like a standard laptop bag (briefcase style) while others look more like a backpack... I have no experience with these, tho if my LBS carried them, I'd bring my laptop down there to atleast see the fitting.
  • 05-03-2008
    citybiker
    Look at a Topeax MTX seatpost rack. the slide in DXP trunk bag has fold-down panniers that will carry most laptops, although you'll need a protective sleeve for your laptop as well. You'll also need the pannier brackets for the rack.
  • 05-04-2008
    ckranak
    bworks,
    i know you don't want to use a non-quick release rack, but it isn't as bad as you think. my commuter is also my main bike for offroad riding. it is a fixed monster cross bike, and to be honest, i quickly adapted to the weight of the rack on the bike and don't even notice it anymore. you can find very minimalist racks that don't weigh very much, and will suit your needs.
  • 05-04-2008
    bworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ckranak
    bworks,
    i know you don't want to use a non-quick release rack, but it isn't as bad as you think. my commuter is also my main bike for offroad riding. it is a fixed monster cross bike, and to be honest, i quickly adapted to the weight of the rack on the bike and don't even notice it anymore. you can find very minimalist racks that don't weigh very much, and will suit your needs.

    Are you saying to just leave the rack on when you go offroad? I suppose I could do that if it is light enough. Or, are you saying that they come off pretty quick and easy. Either way... any suggestions on a rack?
  • 05-04-2008
    ckranak
    I am saying that I just leave my rack on when I go offroad. I have a rack by www.oldmanmountain.com. I have the red rock, but the white rock would suit your needs. It weighs 460g, which is less than a pound. These racks also mount nicely to a bike that doesn't have any rack mounts. I really like their racks, and they are made in Santa Barabara, Ca, if that counts for anything.