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  1. #201
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    Witnesses said he was wearing a helmet.
    Terrible story, but the above is why I'm always wary of the cult-of-helmet. What does wearing a helmet have to do with being assaulted? If someone gets mugged or is beaten up outside a bar does it get reported that they weren't wearing a helmet? If the cyclist wasn't wearing a helmet (and there's no mandatory law in WA) does that make the assault less bad in some way?

    Vehicular cycling is really not statistically dangerous. So even though it's not particularly dangerous now we should expect all cyclists to armor up just in case some #@$%^ decides to attack them? That whole attitude is seriously ****ed.

  2. #202
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    As bad as it is when somebody gets nailed because another person wasn`t paying enough attention, when it`s deliberate, it just burns me up. And with such vague descriptions to go on, not much hope of slamming anybody with it

    Newf, I agree that it`s stupid how the press releases seem to invariably mention the wearing/not wearing bit, even when it has absolutely nothing to do with the situation they`re covering, but I don`t think they do it for any evil reasons. More likely they just feel like the story lacks a few more words and they have nothing else of relevance to add. Kind of like when people always announce the lentgh and weight of a newborn baby- "it`s a boy/girl" doesn`t seem enough, but what else is there to say?

  3. #203
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    Rodar, I'd love to think there's no agenda in there but sadly I can't.

    I mentioned this over in the helmet debate thread, but two years ago where I live a cyclist was killed when an SUV illegally ran a red light, plowed into a car, and then both vehicles crashed into the cyclist. The first newspaper headline was "Cyclist in fatal crash not wearing helmet" because helmets are magic forcefields and every other aspect of the crash was boring, apparently? The media loves to jump on this stuff if given half the chance. In that case it was even more ridiculous because the cyclist actually had been wearing a helmet, but it was lying in pieces 100' away. The paper issued a retraction, but by that point it was too late and they'd already given the yokels all the ammunition they needed.

    If the helmet stuff was only there to add a few extra words, then whether it said "was wearing a helmet" or "wasn't wearing a helmet" wouldn't change peoples' reactions to the story. Like "the baby was 8lbs 2oz" vs "the baby was 7lbs 8oz" - it's cute info, but no reader will get fired about it. But report that a cyclist wasn't wearing a helmet, and that just confirms what everyone already knows which is that all cyclists are @#$% and they deserve what's coming to them, amirite?

  4. #204
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    So bad feel

    Maybe the society is what it like.
    Cheap Nike Shox sale online with all world free shipping.http://www.shoxnz20.com/

  5. #205
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    I took the helmet info as a clue that the guy that was attacked was probably attacked just because he was riding a bike, as opposed to because of being a homeless person (or some other awful reason people get attacked) who happened to be on a bike.

    I agree that the "lack of a helmet by cyclist defense" has been abused, but the lawyers would do that whether or not it is in the paper.

  6. #206
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    If seat belt use in car accident reports was reported as diligently it would be nice.

    These bozos are going to brag. Whether they brag to someone who will pass it on...

  7. #207
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    Snarling face of road rage man filmed by cyclist

    <iframe width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/t5PqTlvfavM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


    LONDON EVENING STANDARD
    4 Aug 2011
    A man threatened to punch a cyclist in the face while being recorded by a camera on his helmet.

    The cyclist put the video on YouTube and it has been viewed by almost 23,000 people. It is the latest evidence posted online of road rage committed against cyclists.

    Footage shows the cyclist negotiate a roundabout leading onto Waterloo Road in Romford. A passenger in a silver Ford Fiesta is seen shouting abuse at him before driving off.

    The car then stops and a man gets out of the car. He raises his fist to the face of the cyclist and threatens to punch him, causing him to fall off his bike.

    The cyclist, who does not wish to be named, can be heard saying: "What did I do?" The outburst took place shortly before 7pm on July 27.

    His video prompted more than 500 comments on YouTube. The cyclist, whose YouTube tag is kmcyc, said: "I have reported this to the police and provided a copy of the video. It is a shame that a few other road users think it's okay to have a pop at cyclists. I hope this man is found soon."

    When praised for refusing to retaliate he said: "Violence being the last resort, that thought was furthest from my mind. I was concerned with what this man (the passenger) might do next and equally concerned as to what the driver might do.

    "Had they joined in, the odds would have shifted against me significantly."

    Kmcyc, who has been cycling for more than 12 years, installed a camera on his helmet about two years ago after a series of near misses with drivers.

    A Met spokesman said: "An allegation has been made. No actual assault took place but it is being looked at in terms of a public order offence."

    Last month police charged a man who was filmed attacking a cyclist in Bexley Village after the footage appeared in the Evening Standard. Simon Page, 49, of Guildford was punched in the head by a driver on 15 May.

  8. #208
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    Yuck. I think I need to commit to the philosophy of just not stopping to talk with morons. If someone starts to lip off I need to just give them a wave and ride away, and have some escape routes planned. A gopro may go on the x-mas list, though.

  9. #209
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    This has given me sofa rage. I've just come from a site called This Is London where moronic low IQ idiots are posting sh*te about banning cyclists from central London etc.
    What an embarrassment this country is sometimes - while the world tries to encourage eco-friendly travel & biking, & in a week where Mark Cavendish is hailed as the best athlete in Britain.
    The only high point about this is we can all laugh at this colossal thick moron's Sid James fashion sense. I would not have been so tolerant & flicked his stupid cap off.

  10. #210
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    In the US, THAT threat counts as assault as I understand it. I don't get it. If he was upset at being held up did he not lose more time being uncivil?

  11. #211
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    It's only a matter of time before his identity is 'outed' by our beloved, moral tabloids - i look forward to the hassle this gives HIM!

  12. #212
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    VT Cyclist Dies in Aftermath of Irene

    Vermont Bicyclist Dies After Fall into Brook

    BRATTLEBORO — Police in Brattleboro say a man has died after riding his bicycle into a section of road washed out by flooding from Tropical Storm Irene and into a brook.

    Police said they received a report at 9:30 a.m. Sunday of a man’s body in Whetstone Brook. His name has not been released pending notification of relatives.


    Investigators believe the victim rode his bicycle around several barricades on Williams Street and fell into a washed-out section of the road and into the stream.


    His body was taken to the Vermont Medical Examiner’s Office for an autopsy to determine the cause of death.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Very sad. Not sure how this happened exactly, but it's become pretty common for bikes or peds to go around barriers because sometimes there is enough road left to get through, and hours if you go around. I was in Brattleboro posting flood info flyers for work when this happened, but did not learn of it then. There are also a lot of hike-commuters now, people drive as far as they can, park on the side of the road, and hike around on trails to get to work.

  13. #213
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    A shelf of undercut roadway would look good but not support a cyclist or a slump could drop you in the drink. A different sort of 'road rage'. A terrible way to go.

    BrIanMc

  14. #214
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    Not exactly commuting related:

    Montreal cabbies cry no fare

    MONTREAL—Life for cabbies in a tough economy is never easy. But in Montreal, they’re facing an additional threat to their pocketbooks — government...

    The Bixi and 747 [airport express bus] services, the latter of which runs round the clock and counts 3,500 trips per day, arguably irk cabbies the most.

    Bilodeau says the bikes have won over many of their former short-trip clients. “You see them, women in dresses, men in ties, pedalling away. They don’t even look like they should be riding a bike,” he said.

  15. #215
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    This part gave me a chuckle:

    >>Bilodeau says the bikes have won over many of their former short-trip clients. “You see them, women in dresses, men in ties, pedalling away. They don’t even look like they should be riding a bike,” he said.<<

    I wonder what people who should ride a bike look like. What do people who should be in a taxi look like?

  16. #216
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    Also not bike commuting related, but this is what my local constabulary is up to:

    from inews880



    Edmonton Police hope a shocking graphic will raise awareness and attention about jaywalking in our city...

    Acting Sergeant Jerrid Maze explains that decals depicting a jaywalker who had been hit are supposed to act as a warning.

    "It's supposed to look like a fourteen-to-fifteen-year-old girl," Maze explains. "She's dressed in blue jeans and a pink top, and she has a backpack on. It's supposed to look like she's been struck by a vehicle, so her eyes are closed and she'll be laying on the sidewalk."
    So every year our police service spends some time "raising awareness" about jaywalking, or the horrors of sidewalk riding or rollerblading, or whatever.

    The thing is that from the city's stats "Pedestrians crossing without the right of way...accounted for 14% injuries or fatalities."

    And that 14% includes pedestrians who have consumed alchohol/drugs (which are typically about 50% of fatalities and 15% of collisions overall, and aren't going to pay attention to PSAs), and I believe it also includes people who are crossing with a greenlight but who entered after the "Don't Walk" light started flashing (which is technically illegal, but our signal phases are often 4-8 seconds of Walk, compared to 24-30 seconds of Don't Walk).

    So who looks at statistics that say that in 86% percent of pedestrian collisions the pedestrian has the right of way, and decides that the other 14% is the problem? And that it's such a problem that it rates pasting dead kids onto sidewalks?

    Just a big sigh from me.....

  17. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    So who looks at statistics that say that in 86% percent of pedestrian collisions the pedestrian has the right of way, and decides that the other 14% is the problem? And that it's such a problem that it rates pasting dead kids onto sidewalks?
    I dunno, but What a poignant message! It just might save a life or two.

  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post

    from inews880
    Should read...

    "I lived in the city where car drivers were always rushing and they killed me"

  19. #219
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    ^ yeah, I actually did these up for fun:




    (and I should redo this one since the 69% is provincial. I didn't find the city's own stats of 86% until later)





    Decals are a great idea - I imagine all the cars in a city covered in decals of corpses (transparent from the inside, of course). The younger the corpses the better!

  20. #220
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    ^^Love those! The "enjoy your unlimited txt plan" is the best.

  21. #221
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    If they don't run us over they'll smoke us out.


  22. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik View Post
    If they don't run us over they'll smoke us out.
    It sucks...
    Articles like these make people not want to commute by bike, but the answer is if we ALL did, this would be a non-issue
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  23. #223
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    Wow, check out MSNBC.com for some footage of a commuter getting swept away by a massive wave in chicago. Waves knock down bikers, joggers

    Edit: Now that I read it and realize that the police had closed off the path and these people used it anyway, it's seriously funny to watch them get pounded by the surf. Hope it wasn't one of you
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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    (no excuse for that either)

  24. #224
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    ^^ That was awesome, thanks for the laugh!

  25. #225
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    They had to see what was ahead of them. So I have to assume reversing course was a poorer option than continuing. After seeing one almost washed away, if those waves were a little bigger they'd be in lake Michigan not just drenched in it. Do you feel lucky, Punk? Well do ya?

  26. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    They had to see what was ahead of them. So I have to assume reversing course was a poorer option than continuing. After seeing one almost washed away, if those waves were a little bigger they'd be in lake Michigan not just drenched in it. Do you feel lucky, Punk? Well do ya?

    Hehe, repeat after me... Moving water is not still water! Puddles are not waves!

  27. #227
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    Uh-oh, new sno-mo trail commuter coming!

    The deed is done, it will look something like this:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post Bike Commuter News-green_fatback_large.jpg  


  28. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    The deed is done, it will look something like this:
    If you get swept out to sea or lake Michigan at least you'll have something to cling to.

  29. #229
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    hahaha, I must be too excited, that post was supposed to go in another thread - but I gues it is "news"!

  30. #230
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    The deed is done, it will look something like this:
    Thou shalt not covet, well mine would need to be bigger, but Gawd! one like it would look go-ood in my stable!.

    BrianMc

  31. #231
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    hahaha, I must be too excited, that post was supposed to go in another thread
    I kind of figured that. Maybe we can let it slide this time...

    "Something like this"? Is that somebody else`s build that yours will be similar to, or a computerized mock up? It looks very mean! You already placed some orders?

  32. #232
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    ^^Yes, that's someone else's build. I put a deposit down on a frame, fork & wheels last night. Shipping from AK in a few weeks.

  33. #233
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    Damn. This happened not more than a couple miles off my commute route...

    Commuting Cyclist Shot with Pellet Gun

  34. #234
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    ^^Yikes, that's scary. Not much you can do to protect yourself from that kind of yahoo.

  35. #235
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  36. #236
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    ^^^ get on the right side of the road, salmon!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  37. #237
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    Peddling the cyclist's cause
    By Sara Phillips

    Posted October 12, 2011 08:47:27
    Ride to work Photo: Cycling has any number of benefits. (Christian Hartmann : Reuters)

    I rode to work today. Someone gave me a muffin for doing so, which was nice, because I would have ridden to work anyway. I ride to work every day. There ain't no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing.

    Yes I'm one of those [expletive] cyclists.

    That chick who was riding on the road that you had to slow down for, who then caught you up at the next lights and you had to slow down for her again, that was probably me.

    I selfishly and legally took up a whole half a lane of traffic. And I didn't even pay registration for my bicycle to be on your road. The cheek of me!

    Cycling is good for the environment. And of course, it's those ABC, tofu-eating types that care about the environment. I've enjoyed tofu and I work for the ABC. I run the environment portal. Just sayin'.

    The carbon footprint of a cyclist is minimal. Compared with driving, it has required no oil to be extracted, refined, shipped to a petrol station and burnt in an internal combustion engine. Only the carbon dioxide from my breath (sometimes a little laboured when cresting a hill) is emitted when I cycle.

    I also emit no NOx and SOx. These compounds of nitrogen and sulphur contribute to the brown haze of smog that blankets our cities. My bike and I bike are a tiny, tiny bit less brown in the city sky each day. Being an [expletive], tofu-wearing cyclist hippy, it makes me feel quite good about not adding to pollution.

    Cycling also means less land is required for roads. If, hypothetically, all of those people in cars, who have paid their vehicle registration (and the percentage of their income taxes and percentage of their rates) that goes into road maintenance, rode a bicycle instead, the four-lane highways that swoop and funnel into our urban areas would be redundant.

    In Copenhagen 40 per cent of people ride instead of drive (which, with all those cyclists, must surely make it a deeply unpleasant city). If this were the case in an Australian city, two lanes of a four-lane road could justifiably be given over to cyclists. And we wouldn't need both of them; one could be used for more cars. Or parking. Or parks.

    Cycling is also good for me. Not only am I interested in the environment, I am concerned about my health. Truly I must be a self-absorbed, anti-social freak.

    I don't ride far, and I don't ride quickly - in fact I barely break a sweat – but that 20 minutes of exercise every morning and again in the evening is exactly what the doctor ordered.

    "Lifestyle diseases" are now the number one health problem facing Australians. These are diseases such as diabetes, obesity and heart disease. In an opinion piece yesterday the coordinator of Bicycle Network Victoria's Ride to Work Day, Anthony Aisenberg - yes a genuine cycling lobbyist - pointed out that three hours of riding a week is enough to cut your risk of heart disease in half.

    My nana died of a heart attack and my Dad has had a quadruple bypass. Looking after my heart is pretty important to me. Selfish, aren't I?

    Cycling keeps me slim, too. I don't want to boast or anything, but I look pretty good for a chick on the downhill side of 35. And you in the car, you're 13 per cent more likely to be fat than me. Consider that as you settle your super-size beverage back into one of your 19 cup-holders.

    I don't have to pay for petrol and parking every day. I don't have to shell out for a train ticket. I don't have spend big on gym membership fees so that I can sit on a stationary bicycle in an air-conditioned office block and watch Oprah as I sweat and pant, while some gratuitously toned instructor screams 'encouragement' at me. So not only am I better looking than the fat motorists, I'm richer than them too.

    But really, truly, there's a reason I go out there every day, in all weather, risking my life on badly designed roads with motorists who believe the only good cyclist is a dead cyclist, (or Cadel Evans 'cos he's an Australian sporting hero).

    It's because it's actually very enjoyable.

    On a crisp morning, with the air cold as it hits my lungs, I push off. Cruising, pedalling, the wind on my cheeks, the rhythm of my legs. Leaves crackling under my tyres, dog-walkers smiling hello, camaraderie at the traffic lights with other cyclists.

    I arrive at work flushed and awake. No crowded train carriages for me. No late buses. No battle with bumper to bumper.

    Cycling has any number of benefits. But I would ride even if it didn't.

    In a word, cycling is fun.

    Sara Phillips is the editor of the ABC's environmental portal.

  38. #238
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    ...
    The carbon footprint of a cyclist is minimal. Compared with driving, it has required no oil to be extracted, refined, shipped to a petrol station and burnt in an internal combustion engine. ...
    I also emit no NOx and SOx. These compounds of nitrogen and sulphur contribute to the brown haze of smog that blankets our cities. ...
    Nice editorial -
    Just want to point out that cycling is not as innocuous as she makes it out - petroleum or bad gasses.

    The manufacturing of bicycles is one of the biggest industries in the world.
    But take a variety of aspects beyond that, and dig deeper to find out thing like Aluminum production is not quite 'good' for the planet, CF, rubber, grease and plastics obviously depend on Petroleum, etc.

    or there's even This Guy's take on it.

    Sure - its a less (way less) of all 'evils', but there is still a decent-sized 'footprint' w/ bicycles.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  39. #239
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    Commuter Cyclist Marks 10 Years Car-Free
    Dave Bonan Gave Away His Car In 2001 And Has Since Logged Thousands Of Miles On His Bike


    Danbury resident Dave Bonan stopped driving in 2001 when his car broke down…
    (Mark Mirko, [email protected])
    October 18, 2011|By ERIK OFGANG, Special to The Courant

    Danbury resident Dave Bonan stopped driving in 2001 when his car broke down and has since logged thousands of miles on his bike. He sometimes does messenger work in New York City.


    If the position existed, Dave Bonan would be named Connecticut's biker laureate.

    Bonan, who lives in Danbury, gave away his car in 2001 and began using a bicycle as his primary source of transportation, and he hasn't looked back or stopped for gas since. Beginning in 2006 he's organized yearly events to mark his car-free anniversary. In March, he celebrated his 10th anniversary by hosting a two-night concert in Danbury that raised funds for a local youth center. On July 16, he completed his longtime goal of biking through the center of all 169 Connecticut municipalities when he biked through Sharon.

    Annually, Bonan estimates he bikes about 6,500 to 7,000 miles. Neither rain, nor snow, nor blazing heat keeps him off the bike seat. While biking, he says he learns about local history, gets in touch with small communities and takes time to smell the roadside roses. He also burns more calories during a week than most people do with a lifetime of gym memberships.

    "When you're in a car there's a disconnect; you're going from point A to point B. On a bicycle you're doing point A to point B, but there's a hundred thousand points in between," Bonan says during a recent interview at Molten Java Coffeehouse in Bethel. On a bike, he adds, "You're seeing things, you're smelling things, you're meeting people. There are ten different emotional levels that you're going through the entire time. I won't say it's spiritual, but it's along those lines."

    Bonan is tall and thin with dark hair and eyes; he possesses the characteristic lack of fat you'd expect from someone who bikes almost everywhere he goes. He rode three and a half miles from his home for this interview — a minor trek for someone capable of 100-mile-plus days. He rides a Giant Seek 1, an all-in-one commuter/distance/racing bike.

    There's not much room on bikes for bumper stickers. Otherwise, Bonan says, his would read, "bicycle, the true community organizer." He adds, "I've met more people on my bike than I have walking or driving."

    He says many of those people showed him how small towns still are special.

    "The smaller towns actually have the real mentality of helping each other, it's not a dream. There are a lot of people who are doing nice things, who don't want anything in return. They're just being normal, nice, helpful, community people."

    Mishap Prompts Lifestyle Change

    A native of New Jersey, Bonan, 35, moved to Danbury to attend Western Connecticut State University. In 2000, the transmission on his car failed. While the car was in the shop, Bonan began biking everywhere and found the experience liberating.

    "I rode for two months and I had a blast. I didn't really know what I was doing, but I was definitely getting healthier and finding out more about my town," he says. "When the car got fixed, I didn't want to hang the bike up, but eventually I did and got more depressed about it. Around late winter 2001, the car just started costing too much in upkeep and I said all right, I'm done, I'm giving it away for a write-off and then I will go car-free."

    Bonan has followed through on that promise. He relies solely on his bicycle for his general day-to-day activities, but he does use public transportation — he rides in airplanes, trains and buses and will, occasionally (about once on month on average), ride as a passenger in a friend's car. He's had three bikes total since he changed his lifestyle.

    When he first decided to give away his car people were skeptical; unlike places such as New York City, the Danbury area is not particularly easy to navigate on a bike or as a pedestrian.

    "People didn't believe I could do it at first. Once I hit year ten, I think people realized it's serious," he says.

    Many people assume Bonan has gone car-free to protect the environment or to raise money for a charity, but that's not the case. Although Bonan is pro-green, his passion for biking is fueled by personal, not political, reasons.

    "It's my happy drug, really," he says. "I'm not anti-car. I'm anti-car culture."

    He adds, "I find that people need to place a label on folks so they fit into a preconceived mold in their thought process."

    Although Bonan is not against cars or the people who drive them, he does note with satisfaction that the last time he paid for gas it cost $1.30 a gallon. He also brags about not being saddled with expensive car repairs or insurance. His bike cost $800 and he's learned to do a lot of repairs on his own.

    When he's not biking, Bonan works as a freelance journalist, filmmaker and political and event organizer. He's currently producing a documentary called "Still Flowing: The Movie," about the Still River in Danbury. The offbeat environmental and historical film also examines some of Bonan's biking exploits. It should be completed within the next year and then will be screened on the festival circuit.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post Bike Commuter News-danbury65475010.jpg  


  40. #240
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    Man in critical condition after being hit by a vehicle



    A 70-year-old man was left with life-threatening injuries after he was hit by a vehicle on a west Edmonton service road while riding his bicycle home from work Friday evening...

    “This vehicle that struck this gentleman didn’t stop, and left the area,” said Sgt. Gary Lamont, a member of the Edmonton Police Service’s collision investigation unit...

    Police were called to the scene by a woman who drove by the man on the service road shortly after 7 p.m. Police could not say Friday how long the victim was left unattended on the street: The man usually leaves his place of work near 149th Street and Yellowhead Trail around 6 p.m., police said, and it may have taken him about 10 or 15 minutes to ride his bike to where he was hit. “I can only hope that this gentleman wasn’t lying there for half an hour, 40 minutes,” Lamont said...

    The back wheel of the bicycle was bent and folded almost in half. A reflective vest sat in a pile next to the dented bicycles. Two shoes, a woollen hat and a pair gloves were scattered along the side of the street.
    Terrible news. This would have been around sunset, but there's still plenty of ambient light until around 7.

    My local paper and police service both have a history of finding any excuse that they can to blame cyclists and pedestrians (they've even done it in the case of hit-and-runs, where the driver is undeniably guilty of a criminal offense if nothing else), so I'm glad to see that there's not a trace of that here.
    Last edited by newfangled; 10-23-2011 at 11:58 AM.

  41. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    I'm glad to see that there's not a trace of that here.
    Me too, Newf (even though I probably come off kind of anti cyclist some times). Please let us know if any more comes up about the incedent or the man`s condition. 70 Y.O. and still commuting by bike. Then to see what the remains of his bike look like, I hate to imagine how the rider looks.

  42. #242
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    From huffingtonpost.com:

    Swapping Tail Pipes For Pedals: Small Changes Could Pay Huge Dividends For Public Health And Economy

    Like a growing number of Americans, Jonathan Patz rides his bike to work. He even drags a wheeled blue bin behind his bike for trips to the grocery store. Sure, this environmental scientist naturally wants to do his part to preserve the planet's future, but his motivation is also personal: He knows his wallet, waistline, heart, lungs and neighbors will benefit today.

    "If we were to think about reducing greenhouse gases to solve the global warming problem, we could have some immediate major health benefits," says Patz, director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and lead author of a new study highlighting the "four-way win" that comes with swapping cars for bikes: reduced greenhouse emissions and gains in air quality, fitness and the economy. Patz is also a professor in Madison's Nelson Institute and Department of Population Health Sciences.

    In the study, published today in Environmental Health Perspectives, Patz and his colleagues looked to the more than 30 million people residing in urban and suburban areas of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. They asked: What if during the nicest six months of the year, those residents left their cars at home for round-trips of five miles or less? And what if they chose to replace half of those short car trips, which account for about 20 percent of all vehicle miles traveled, with cycling? According to their calculations, making those short trips on bicycles could save approximately four trillion pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, 1,100 lives and $7 billion in mortality and health care costs for the region every year.

    "Fighting global climate change could be one of the greatest public health opportunities we've had in a century," Patz told Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso last month in the Tibetan leader's home in Dharamsala, India.

    "This is where I look to your wisdom and writing," he added. "Everything starts with the individual -- we start with ourselves."

    "Wonderful," Dalai Lama replied, bowing his head to Patz. "Wonderful. Very good."

    Michael Brauer likes the idea, too. Every day, he rides his bike to The University of British Columbia in Vancouver, where he is a professor of population and public health. He chooses to pedal partly for the physical activity and partly because he simply enjoys it more than driving.

    But not all cities are as bike-friendly as Vancouver or Madison, the latter having earned the League of American Bicyclists' "gold-certification." And then there's "platinum" Boulder, Colo., where Brauer claims you can "cycle through the city without coming into contact with cars."

    He suggests the benchmarks used in the study are "aspirational" but not realistic, at least not in the short term. "Many people cannot get anywhere even if they want to by choosing to walk or cycle for short trips," says Brauer. Neighborhoods are simply not designed that way: Roads may not be connected or amenities may be too far from residences.

    Brauer also notes that the new study does not account for the air pollution risks and physical hazards bikers face on urban roads. Still, that doesn't deter him from biking. The benefits far outweigh the costs, he tells HuffPost. (Researchers in Holland calculated the benefit-to-cost ratio at nine-to-one.)

    Further, Brauer suggests that any health trade-offs could easily be eliminated by separating bike lanes from busy car thoroughfares, as is currently being done in Manhattan. Even better, designating every second street exclusively for cars or bikes would simultaneously address the air pollution issue.

    "It doesn't have to be fancy or complicated," he says. Or expensive: Considering the money that could be saved, urban biking can even make good economic sense. "Think about the costs of the way our cities and transportation networks are designed now," says Brauer. "If you made some changes to reduce the related health costs, that money could be used to pay for better infrastructure." Bike-friendly additions might include share programs and additional bike racks on buses and curbside.

    European nations have been pursuing similar changes for decades, with promising successes.

    Patz suggests that the behavioral changes reflected in his study -- even if implemented solely in the upper Midwest -- would be equivalent to bringing the entire country in alignment with the national ozone standard. As it turns out, a large fraction of dirty emissions come out of the tailpipe within the first few minutes of starting a car. Cutting short trips therefore provides a disproportionately large reduction in particulate matter and other dangerous pollution.

    Patz points to a natural case study: the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. During the games, the city experienced a 23 percent reduction in morning traffic, a 28 percent drop in peak levels of ozone pollution and 42 percent fewer emergency room visits from children suffering asthma attacks.

    "And any improvement in air quality benefits the entire population, so in aggregate the public health benefits of even relatively small improvements can be large," adds Brauer. "These health costs and benefits clearly should be incorporated into transportation infrastructure planning."

    "We need to make our cities not just built for automobiles," Patz says, "but built for people."

  43. #243
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    Removing 1200 bikes + 6 tons of scrap metal/year from bike storage


  44. #244
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    VT'r on Interstate Shows Poor Judgement, Driving & Biking...

    I-89 bicyclist arrested in curfew violation

    RICHMOND -- A Barre man found bicycling in the breakdown lane of Interstate 89 in Richmond was jailed at the Chittenden Community Correctional Center for violating his curfew, Vermont State Police said.

    Dustin Dunkling, 18, was under a court order in to observe a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew, Sgt. Gregory Campbell said in a news release. Dunkling was charged with grossly negligent driving and trying to elude police in connection with a chase on Interstate 91 on Oct. 17 in southern Vermont.

    The release said Dunkling was spotted shortly after 6:36 p.m. Saturday peddling on I-89 in Richmond.

    Dunkling was lodged at the South Burlington prison for lack of $750 bail.


    Bikes are not allowed on the interstates here, and there is a bike-legal secondary road parallel and just 50' away

  45. #245
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    Toronto News: Dead cyclist Jenna Morrison was a yoga teacher, dancer, mom - thestar.com


    we ride this intersection twice a day, every single day, with my son in the trailer.
    he's asked what the flowers are for, I don't know how to answer him.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  46. #246
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    Oh jeez, that's awful, and I don't know how I'd answer that either. I do recall when my Mom died when I was six, I really had no concept of what death was.

  47. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts View Post
    ...we ride this intersection twice a day, every single day, with my son in the trailer. He's asked what the flowers are for, I don't know how to answer him.
    Tell him it is to celebrate the life of a wonderful wife, mother, and person. He may ask why and where. Likely not the how and you can just say it was an accident.

    It sounds like the truck overtook her at the intersection ad forgot she was there in his blind spot. We need to be especially concerned about overtaking trucks, it seems. I sure hope it wasn't the same driver (3 deaths) now in TO.

    BrianMc

  48. #248
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    Bike thief busted

    Condensed version:
    A girl in CO thought she saw her stolen bike on Boulder Craigslist. Arranged to check it out, determined that it really was her bike, so she took it for a "test ride" and just kept on testing . Cool enough there, but the really unbelieveable part happened when she called the cops to report the seller.

    Unabridged version:
    Colorado Woman Spots Stolen Bike on Craigslist, Steals it Back | ABC News Blogs - Yahoo!

  49. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Condensed version:
    A girl in CO thought she saw her stolen bike on Boulder Craigslist. Arranged to check it out, determined that it really was her bike, so she took it for a "test ride" and just kept on testing . Cool enough there, but the really unbelieveable part happened when she called the cops to report the seller.

    Unabridged version:
    Colorado Woman Spots Stolen Bike on Craigslist, Steals it Back | ABC News Blogs - Yahoo!
    Cool, I was about to bust a gasket if she got arrested or something!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  50. #250
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    Yeah, I guess I got a little over dramatic there, but it really surprised me that the police even went through the trouble of listening to her, let alone actually going out to drag the real bad guy in.

    A glimmer of hope in the world...

  51. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Yeah, I guess I got a little over dramatic there, but it really surprised me that the police even went through the trouble of listening to her, let alone actually going out to drag the real bad guy in.

    A glimmer of hope in the world...
    true to that
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  52. #252
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    Nice! I must share in the women's lounge (forum).

  53. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Condensed version:
    A girl in CO thought she saw her stolen bike on Boulder Craigslist. Arranged to check it out, determined that it really was her bike, so she took it for a "test ride" and just kept on testing .
    The owner of Yellow Jersey Bike Shop, Madison WI, had someone do a five fingered discount on one of his nicer (rarer) bikes. (Not sure how that happened.) Within a week he saw it being ridden past his shop. A stop sign and traffic allowed him to catch the cyclist, knock him off the bike and recover the stolen merchandise. Unfortunately for him, two city police were chowing down on donuts at the coffee shop opposite. He has put against a wall while the theif (or owner of stolen merchandise) got away. The cops couldn't believe he could recognize one bike from another. If it was the theif riding by the scene of the crime, I bet he didn't think so either. Thirty years of building and repairing them isn't sufficient expertise? Of course, store records, the serial number, and the reported theft cleared the store owner. The lack of pursuit of bicycle thieves is more understandable when the officers have a hard time distinguishing between beach cruisers, BMX, fatbikes, FS, or ultralight road bikes. I wonder if recumbents or trikes are hard for them to distinguish? Asked why he took the law in his own hands, he said you guys just sat there letting him ride by on my bike! Kind of makes you wish they'd charged him with taking the law into his own hands, as the court scene would play out nicely: "Officer what were you doing at the time the stolen bike and its rider came into your view..."

    I suspect that she'd never have seen her bke again, if she'd left it to law enforcement.

    BrianMc

  54. #254
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    Lovely.

    Toronto man charged after car mounts sidewalk, knocks cyclist to ground

    A man faces several charges in the incident that unfolded Wednesday morning on a west-end street.

    Police say a 35-year-old woman was riding her bike in the city's west end when she got into the left lane in order to make a left turn.

    A 38-year-old man driving a car behind the woman also wanted to make a left turn, police said, adding the driver went into the oncoming lane to pass the cyclist.

    Shortly afterwards, an argument ensued between the two, police said.

    It's alleged the man turned his car toward the woman, forcing her onto the sidewalk. The driver then drove up onto the sidewalk and continued alongside the cyclist before striking her with his car and knocking her to the ground.

    The woman sustained minor injuries and was aided by witnesses at the scene, police said. The car driver fled but later turned himself in to police...

  55. #255
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    Man, that`s nuts! "Minor injuries" isn`t good, but better than last week`s incedent, at least. I`d like to have heard how that argument went. Do you suppose the cyclist told the driver to keep it on the sidewalk?

  56. #256
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    In many places that would count as assault with a deadly weapon. Reckless endangerment, certainly. As I remember TO constabulary, they'd take an awfully dim view of this. I assume he underestimated her speed and ended up stranded in the oncoming lane when she reached the stop line.

    Turning himself in was good. I wonder if a call went out and he knew he was fried, or it was a true sense of remorse? Counts better if the latter.

    BrianMc

  57. #257
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    The locals are discussing it here: http://forums.mtbr.com/eastern-canad...ml#post8620477

    But a little more details

    The driver passed the 35-year-old woman in the oncoming lanes as they both turned, sparking an argument.

    Joey Porretta who works at the auto repair shop at the intersection said he heard the blare of a car horn and got to the front of his shop in time to see the cyclist kicking at the side of the black car.

    “I just saw legs and arms flying,” he said.

    The cyclist rode off and the car followed.

    Further east on Harbord, near Grace St., police say the driver turned his car toward the woman, forcing her onto the sidewalk and driving alongside her. The woman was struck by the car and knocked off her bike. The driver fled...

    Matthew Nettleton, 38, turned himself in to police a few hours later. He is charged with failure to stop after an accident, dangerous operation and assault with a weapon.
    From Toronto News: Man charged in violent driver-cyclist incident - thestar.com

  58. #258
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    Cycle Therapists

    Cycling Enthusiasts Promote Mental Health Gain Of Winter Riding

    VPR News: Cycling Enthusiasts Promote Mental Health Gain Of Winter Riding

    Ironically, I missed the above VT Public Radio show since I bikecommute. Link has story & show.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post Bike Commuter News-radio.jpg  


  59. #259

  60. #260
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    ^^^ WTF is wrong w/ PEOPLE
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  61. #261
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    I don`t know if I`m off base or not, but that would surprise me a lot less, had it happened in the US.

  62. #262
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I don`t know if I`m off base or not, but that would surprise me a lot less, had it happened in the US.
    The same attack happened here in Winnipeg, Canada only they used fishing line and almost slit the woman's head off. She required plastic surgery to try and repair some of the damage.

    Was a bunch of teenagers who did it for no reason at all... just to be cruel.

  63. #263
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    ^ that happened in Winnipeg too? In Edmonton a couple kids strung a fishing line across a trail in June of 2010.

    Cyclist cut by fishing line on Edmonton trail - Edmonton - CBC News

    An Edmonton woman suffered cuts to her face and neck after she rode her bicycle into a fishing line strung across a bike path...

    The line hit Jacobson on the bridge of her nose, got caught in her teeth, then sliced into the side of her neck as she turned her head.

    "EMT [Emergency Medical Technician] said had it caught me right in the neck, like come down six inches [15 centimetres] lower, it could have been a different story, right?" she said...

    Jacobson then saw what had hit her. A fishing pole had been stuck upright into the ground and the line was strung across the riverside trail.

    Jacobson remembered seeing a group of four young men sitting in the picnic area and she went back to ask them why the line was strung across the trail. The boys asked her why she was riding so fast, she said, and the conversation soon became confrontational...
    edit: I say "kids" but from reading the story I actually mean 21 year old morons.

  64. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ that happened in Winnipeg too? In Edmonton a couple kids strung a fishing line across a trail in June of 2010.



    edit: I say "kids" but from reading the story I actually mean 21 year old morons.
    No, i guess it was Edmonton... The point is *******'s who do that stuff aren't confined to America so be on the lookout.

    I know of piano wire being strung for snowmobile riders also... sick.

  65. #265
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    ^ well, I'm glad that there's only been one fishing line incident in western canada. Two would be crazy.

  66. #266
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    Quebec courts rule for Cyclists, and against city governments

    Date: 22 December 2011
    Posted By : by Dianne Saxe

    Two Quebec cases have held municipalities liable, where cyclists were injured when they lost control of their bicycles after riding over unexpected defects in the road. In Wilson Davies c. Montreal (Ville de), the cyclist was severely injured when she was thrown from her bicycle and became a paralyzed from the neck down. The Court rejected the City’s argument that, as the route was not designated for cycling, it was not foreseeable that a cyclist would be injured. The Court concluded that the City owed a duty to provide for the safety of everyone who used the City’s infrastructure in a normal, foreseeable and authorized manner – including cyclists. The cyclist was awarded over $1 million in damages.

    In Scanlan c. Montreal (Ville de), a cyclist was injured after riding over an unexpected depression in the road, where the asphalt had caved in. The cave in was camouflaged by paint applied by an independent contractor retained by the City. The paint created a trap, giving the impression that the road was in good condition. The Quebec Court of Appeal ruled that the municipality had an obligation to ensure the safety of its citizens, to correct dangerous situations which could lead to accidents for road users, and to ensure its staff met their obligations to inform road users of potential hazards. The municipality could not avoid liability by simply granting the road painting contract to a third party.

  67. #267
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Date: 22 December 2011
    Posted By : by Dianne Saxe

    Two Quebec cases have held municipalities liable, where cyclists were injured when they lost control of their bicycles after riding over unexpected defects in the road. In Wilson Davies c. Montreal (Ville de), the cyclist was severely injured when she was thrown from her bicycle and became a paralyzed from the neck down. The Court rejected the City’s argument that, as the route was not designated for cycling, it was not foreseeable that a cyclist would be injured. The Court concluded that the City owed a duty to provide for the safety of everyone who used the City’s infrastructure in a normal, foreseeable and authorized manner – including cyclists. The cyclist was awarded over $1 million in damages.

    In Scanlan c. Montreal (Ville de), a cyclist was injured after riding over an unexpected depression in the road, where the asphalt had caved in. The cave in was camouflaged by paint applied by an independent contractor retained by the City. The paint created a trap, giving the impression that the road was in good condition. The Quebec Court of Appeal ruled that the municipality had an obligation to ensure the safety of its citizens, to correct dangerous situations which could lead to accidents for road users, and to ensure its staff met their obligations to inform road users of potential hazards. The municipality could not avoid liability by simply granting the road painting contract to a third party.
    As a mtb'r i'm split on this issue... i hate to see bicycles banned from forests due to litigation over challenging terrain features, but i also don't like to see poorly maintained streets hurting people.

  68. #268
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    Bad Samaritan

    'Cowardly and despicable' thief took crashed bike as cyclist lay dying in canal just yards away

    Adam Lowther said he thought Michael Houghton was already dead so didn't try to help him
    He sold the stolen bike for just £20

    By Liz Hull
    Last updated at 10:33 PM on 6th January 2012

    A ‘despicable’ thief stole a retired banker’s bicycle as he was drowning in a canal.

    Michael Houghton, 51, was face down in the water when Adam Lowther, 22, came along the towpath.

    Instead of rescuing the unconscious father of three or calling for help, Lowther picked up his mountain bike and rode off on it.

    Read more: Adam Lowther left cyclist Michael Houghton to drown as he stole his bike | Mail Online

  69. #269
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    SPOTLIGHT: Cold-weather riders keep pedaling

    A good article in today's Chicago Tribune: SPOTLIGHT: Cold-weather riders keep pedaling - chicagotribune.com

  70. #270
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    ^^ Nice coverage, but some of those folks look fairly sane compared to some of the winter commuters here!

    Bike commuter stats in graphic form:
    about the creator: Whiteaker resident wins national competition for best “bicycle commuting trends” interactive infographics | MyEugene

    The graphs: Kory Northrop | Bicycle Commuting Trends in the United States Rodar, Nevada does not look quite as safe in these graphics.

    Although there are more male bikecommuters, it looks like the guys have been slacking off compared to the women in the last couple years.

  71. #271
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    I agree with you mtbxplorer. The graphs you posted are great! I hope to be able to produce graphs of that quality using GIS.

  72. #272
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    I couldn't decide if I should put this here or in the "armed commuters' thread

    Cops: Man, 65, kills teen who knocks him off bicycle - US news - Crime & courts - msnbc.com
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  73. #273
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    Interesting that the unwounded teen was arrested. That says a lot to me. Suggests it was pretty obviously 3 on 1. Bike theft gone bad? Sounds justifiable as self defense especially as he did not shoot and kill all three.

    An off duty police woman in a city near where I was raised was attacked by a man as she loaded things into the rear seat of her car. She had heat of her own. The hopeful rapist obtained a third eye as his reward. While the loss of any life is to be lamented, sometimes it just feels like justice.

    I wonder if the cyclist had trouble with one or more of them before.

    BrianMc

  74. #274
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    Reading the original story, looks like a pretty clear-cut case of justifiable self defense. Why weren't these kids in school?

  75. #275
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    Bus V Bike

    Moment of madness. The video is especially interresting.

    BBC News - Bristol bus driver Gavin Hill who drove into cyclist jailed

  76. #276
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    Holy cr*p!!! That video is way worse than I expected, even after reading the article (not gruesome, just unbelievable)..

  77. #277
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    At first you can't see where Mr Mead (the cyclist), came from. He was in front of the stopped bus arguing with the driver over a too-close approach in a roundabout. Understandable, risky, so Mr Mead must have been quite PO'd. Not your usual near hit.

    So what ensued after Mr Mead rode off, was assault with a deadly weapon. Video cams are everywhere. We need to be on our best behavior at all times. Also it appears better to allow a driver who you argued with to proceed you down the road. It takes enough time to U-turn that he will likely have become more rational. No point in making it easy to retaliate even if it will be the driver's fault.

    BrianMc

  78. #278
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    " Also it appears better to allow a driver who you argued with to proceed you down the road. It takes enough time to U-turn that he will likely have become more rational. No point in making it easy to retaliate even if it will be the driver's fault."

    No kidding! It`s bad enough to be tailgated by a bus, really a bad sign when you`ve just been arguing with the driver!

    And probably a whole lot slower for the bus to make that U-turn than for a bike to make one.

  79. #279
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    That is crazy.

    But I've been not-so-politely informed by one of our busdrivers that if cyclists had any consideration at all then they would hop up onto the curb whenever there was a bus behind them. It's illegal, and it's not even physically possible on most roads, but apparently the fact that cyclists continuously refuse to do this is a personal insult to him.

  80. #280
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    That is crazy.

    But I've been not-so-politely informed by one of our busdrivers that if cyclists had any consideration at all then they would hop up onto the curb whenever there was a bus behind them.
    Apparently the bus driver in question thought so, too.

    BrianMc

  81. #281
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    Watching the video, I was struck (no pun intended - can't find a better word at this hour) by the position of the cyclist in the lane. As the bus starts to "pass" him, it looks like he moves out, almost crossing the lane line as though he's trying to cut the bus off?

    This is not a "blame the victim" comment at all, as there is no excuse for what the driver did, but it seems a very odd line for a rider to take. Did anyone else think that odd, or was it just me?

    Perhaps there was some road rage on both sides of that dispute?

  82. #282
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubernerd View Post
    Perhaps there was some road rage on both sides of that dispute?
    Definitely.
    Although I can`t see in the video what the cyclist is doing while the bus is still behind him, the account given in the article really makes me wince when it describes how the cyclist acted earlier.

  83. #283
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    I think they should give the buss driver 16 months on a bike so he knows why he is such an ....ummmm
    looks like he could lose a few pounds anyway
    just sayin

    Sj
    I am slow therefore I am

  84. #284
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    Still riding @ 81 - RIP
    Man dies after falling off bicycle overnight » Redding Record Searchlight
    Authorities said an 81-year-old man died near a creek after falling off his bicycle and on Highway 36 overnight.

    The cause of death is unknown, they said.

    The man, of Red Bluff, was riding westbound when he lost his balance, possibly because of a deflated rear tire, said officers with the California Highway Patrol.

    Officers said he suffered "minor" injuries: bruises on his forehead and a cut on his hand. The man then walked with his bicycle for a short time before abandoning his bicycle and crawled underneath barbed wire to access Dibble Creek to flush his wounds, officers said.

    He then lay down in a prone position and died just after midnight this morning. He was not wearing a helmet.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  85. #285
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubernerd View Post
    Watching the video, I was struck (no pun intended - can't find a better word at this hour) by the position of the cyclist in the lane. As the bus starts to "pass" him, it looks like he moves out, almost crossing the lane line as though he's trying to cut the bus off?

    This is not a "blame the victim" comment at all, as there is no excuse for what the driver did, but it seems a very odd line for a rider to take. Did anyone else think that odd, or was it just me?

    Perhaps there was some road rage on both sides of that dispute?
    I saw that too. Maybe he was trying to move over knowing that the bust had to get into that lane? who knows. I hate riding near buses i never know what they are going to do. I get around them as fast as I can.

    It scares me to think that a bus driver would consider doing this to someone.

  86. #286
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    That`s definitely an odd story.
    Yeah, RIP.

  87. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    That`s definitely an odd story.
    Yeah, RIP.
    as noted in the comments, it was poorly written
    - and there is no follow-up

    Our media (as w/ many I'm sure) (NorCal) does not care to follow-up unless there are juicy tid-bits :
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  88. #288
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    That does seem odd, hopefully he died of natural causes unrelated to the ride.

    Did you see the 100 year old who had a record setting ride?
    100-year-old Frenchman sets one-hour cycling world... | Stuff.co.nz
    He looks great too.

  89. #289
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    How many times have you felt like doing this?

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ESo0Ig9fJ3A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  90. #290
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ESo0Ig9fJ3A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    only once this year
    I think I am getting better

    Sj
    I am slow therefore I am

  91. #291
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    Had the desire to do that just last week to a car parked in the bike lane, forcing me in to traffic. (This has been a repeated problem in one certain block in front of an apt. complex.) I checked my instinct and looked over as I rode by to see it was an unmarked police vehicle and 3 officers were standing a short distance away pounding on an apt. door. Whew!

  92. #292
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    Tell GP about cycling to avoid unnecessary tests

    Hate to post this, but maybe you fellas can "avoid unpleasant further investigation"

    A senior doctor has said that GPs should check whether male patients are keen cyclists before sending them for potentially unnecessary – not to mention uncomfortable – tests to ascertain whether they may have prostate cancer, reports The Daily Telegraph.

    Consultant urologist Chris Eden from the Royal Surrey County Hospital in Guildford says that cycling can temporarily raise levels of the glycoprotein prostate-specific antigen (PSA), potentially leading doctors to mistakenly recommend that the patient undergo a biopsy to test for prostate cancer, which may be indicated by excessive levels of PSA.

    "Unfortunately some doctors may be unaware that cycling can spuriously raise a man`s PSA levels and so refer their patient for further and unnecessary treatment,” explained Mr Eden, “all because their cycling produced a false positive." he said.

    He added that the heightened levels of the glycoprotein among bike riders did not in itself give rise to an increased risk of contracting prostate cancer.

    "Cycling does raise PSA levels but only temporarily. So the way to distinguish whether cycling has caused a rise in levels is to refrain from getting on a bike for 48 hours and then having a second PSA test. The levels will have dropped if cycling was responsible for the rise," he said.

    The test measures how much PSA there is in the blood. All men will have a small amount present, but production of PSA by prostate cancer cells can lead to elevated levels of it, with the test helping doctors determine whether further investigation is needed.

    The Daily Telegraph said that 36,000 men, mainly aged 50 and over, are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year in the UK, adding that while the charity Cancer Research has identified an increased incidence of the condition over the past two decades, that has not translated into higher mortality rates, itself in part a result of the PSA test.

    "The irony here is that physical exercise such as cycling is actually protective against prostate cancer since it`s a way to avoid weight gain and is generally a way to keep healthy,” said Mr Eden, who believes that all men aged 40 and over should be aware of their PSA level.

    “It`s important that cyclists don`t get scared off from enjoying their hobby,” he added. “I think any man who is a regular cyclist and who needs a PSA test should tell their doctor about their hobby.

    “It`s surprising how many doctors may not know about the association and this could avoid unpleasant further investigation. Mentioning you regularly use your bike could save on a lot of discomfort."

  93. #293
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    [I]Hate to post this...
    why? 'tis good to put out PSA's that apply to us

    (tried to rep )
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  94. #294
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    Right on

  95. #295
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    Food Delivery Bikers in NYC - Tips n Taxis


  96. #296
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    Got ID?

    Police seeking public's help in identifying unconscious cyclist

    Victoria Times Colonist March 19, 2012 2:01 AM


    A cyclist was in critical condition after hitting a jogger in Qualicum Beach on Saturday.

    The cyclist didn't have any identification on him after the 6 a.m. collision on Rupert Road, and Oceanside RCMP are trying to find out who the man is.

    He is described as Caucasian, between 50 and 55 years old, about six feet tall, with a greying moustache and a closely shaved head. The man was riding an old blue Norco bike in poor condition. He wore black fleece pants, black rubber boots, a plaid fleece jacket, a multi-coloured knitted toque, a black Nexxus watch and a wedding band.

    The female jogger was taken to Nanaimo Regional Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

    The man was taken to Victoria General Hospital via air ambulance. As of Saturday night, he hadn't regained consciousness. Anyone who can assist in identifying the man is asked to call Oceanside RCMP at 250-248-6111.

    Read more: Police seeking public's help in identifying unconscious cyclist

  97. #297
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    It's like an advertisement for Road ID - which I have.

  98. #298
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    I refuse to wear the equivalent of a toe-tag. They can put that on my dead body, which according to road-id literature will be sooner than later.

    I'll just pack my drivers licence and an ICE number... thanks!!

  99. #299
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Hate to post this, but maybe you fellas can "avoid unpleasant further investigation"

    A senior doctor has said that GPs should check whether male patients are keen cyclists before sending them for potentially unnecessary – not to mention uncomfortable – tests to ascertain whether they may have prostate cancer, reports The Daily Telegraph.

    Consultant urologist Chris Eden from the Royal Surrey County Hospital in Guildford says that cycling can temporarily raise levels of the glycoprotein prostate-specific antigen (PSA), potentially leading doctors to mistakenly recommend that the patient undergo a biopsy to test for prostate cancer, which may be indicated by excessive levels of PSA.

    "Unfortunately some doctors may be unaware that cycling can spuriously raise a man`s PSA levels and so refer their patient for further and unnecessary treatment,” explained Mr Eden, “all because their cycling produced a false positive." he said.

    He added that the heightened levels of the glycoprotein among bike riders did not in itself give rise to an increased risk of contracting prostate cancer.

    "Cycling does raise PSA levels but only temporarily. So the way to distinguish whether cycling has caused a rise in levels is to refrain from getting on a bike for 48 hours and then having a second PSA test. The levels will have dropped if cycling was responsible for the rise," he said.

    The test measures how much PSA there is in the blood. All men will have a small amount present, but production of PSA by prostate cancer cells can lead to elevated levels of it, with the test helping doctors determine whether further investigation is needed.

    The Daily Telegraph said that 36,000 men, mainly aged 50 and over, are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year in the UK, adding that while the charity Cancer Research has identified an increased incidence of the condition over the past two decades, that has not translated into higher mortality rates, itself in part a result of the PSA test.

    "The irony here is that physical exercise such as cycling is actually protective against prostate cancer since it`s a way to avoid weight gain and is generally a way to keep healthy,” said Mr Eden, who believes that all men aged 40 and over should be aware of their PSA level.

    “It`s important that cyclists don`t get scared off from enjoying their hobby,” he added. “I think any man who is a regular cyclist and who needs a PSA test should tell their doctor about their hobby.

    “It`s surprising how many doctors may not know about the association and this could avoid unpleasant further investigation. Mentioning you regularly use your bike could save on a lot of discomfort."
    Been there done that....

    Lots of things can elevate mens' PSA tests....biking, Infections, if anything prods the prostrate PSA levels will be elevated....including the finger examine inself.

    Around here standard procedure is high PSA means you get the finger up the bum....not a biopsy.

    If the finger test is clean then you wait and get another PSA.....

    If the finger test is not clean you get the biopsy.

  100. #300
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ESo0Ig9fJ3A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    That was beautiful.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  101. #301
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Police seeking public's help in identifying unconscious cyclist

    Victoria Times Colonist March 19, 2012 2:01 AM...
    Another curious story. I wonder how often a bicycle/pedestrian collision results in two hospitalizations. Maybe it isn`t as odd as it sounds to me. And yeah, it is a good argument for carrying ID. Anyway, hope it turns out well for both victims.

  102. #302
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  103. #303
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    ^^Holy cr*p! I'm surprised he didn't have a heart attack.

  104. #304
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    ^^^ Front version of the antelope tackle!

    What? She did not intend to have her poorly trained pup off the leash? It just sort of happened? Most dog problems are owner problems.

    BrianMc

  105. #305
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    "My doggie minds me and does not need to be on a leash". How many times have we heard that? Lucky that guy did not go down. The owner needs someone to watch her.

  106. #306
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    Haha, that is nothing...



    Off leash in the park and decided it would be fun to run down a cyclist. Needless to say force was used(not that it did much!) even if it does "just wants to play" it's a damn dangerous situation to be riding a bicycle and get charged and jumped on by something like that.

    There truly are some retarded owners out there.

  107. #307
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    Any bikecommuter reports from ND on this?

    Cyclists Warned to steer Clear of North Dakota's Oil Patch

    The Associated Press: Cyclists warned to steer clear of ND's oil patch

  108. #308
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    Freaky, fishy accident

    Apparently, the seriously injured cyclist was not hurt by a malicious "clothesline" booby trap incident on the bike path, but by a fly fisherman having trouble reeling in the big one.

    Police: Injured cyclist not the victim of a 'booby trap' | 9news.com

  109. #309
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    ^^^ Uhh, why is your line across a BIKE PATH!!
    If not 'malicious', it's pretty fukkin stoopid - and that asshat should still be liable.
    sounds 'fishy' to me

    I can say this because I, too, am a fisherman.
    It is negligence at best.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  110. #310
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    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  111. #311
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    This is some funny stuff. Please listen and comment.
    Grant Peterson on NPR

    Ride your bike to work in a suit on a muggy August day, great advice there. You can get a decent bike for $400. Yes Grant, that's great. Here's my $400, I like a 60cm frame, please give me your entry level Rivendell. If he's trying NOT to sell his new book it just worked. What a tool.

  112. #312
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    ^^Your commute is over ten miles, isn`t it? As long as you can carry broccoli, you`re covered- you have his permision to wear shorts if you want

  113. #313
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    That seemed snootier commentary than the roadies he complains about. Seems a shame to be so divisive when we're all on bikes. I don't think he recruited any drivers either.

  114. #314
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    yeah - 'click-in' shoes are dumb - so is wearing clothes you can change out of because they are sweaty.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  115. #315
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    ^^^ Uhh, why is your line across a BIKE PATH!!
    If not 'malicious', it's pretty fukkin stoopid - and that asshat should still be liable.
    sounds 'fishy' to me

    I can say this because I, too, am a fisherman.
    It is negligence at best.
    When it comes to injuring cyclists, negligence is apparently an acceptable excuse these days.

  116. #316
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    I wanna know, if my commute were EXACTLY ten miles, could I wear shorts or not? And is it cool to wear clickies if you can carry two pounds of broccoli while you`re at it?

  117. #317
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    I am trying to imagine riding in Southern Indiana Summer Sauna say 15-20 miles with the seams of sodden cotton under shorts cutting into tender skin and barking shins when dress shoes slip off the pedals. Or riding the winter gale in a trench coat, scarf, and suit. I know he has a mission of not making bike commuting look so weird, but that is not too realistic given the climates of most of the continent.. I assume he rides in climate much like the Netherlands and is incapable of imagining other realities at fairly low speeds. He also feels discs are not needed even on his mountain bikes so I guess he hasn't ridden many snow storms with wet and icy rims. A snow storm and a nice downhill with a stop at the bottom might change his mind. Of course, $1000-$3000 frames are a bit pricier than most can justify for a commuter. Not to mention protect from theft.

    Oh well, no book sale here either.

    BrianMc

  118. #318
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^Your commute is over ten miles, isn`t it? As long as you can carry broccoli, you`re covered- you have his permision to wear shorts if you want
    I carry broccoli in my water bottle holders. I have 2 and I can fit a pound in each. It is a very trendy chic look.

  119. #319
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    Quote Originally Posted by R+P+K View Post
    When it comes to injuring cyclists, negligence is apparently an acceptable excuse these days.
    He could claim to be 'distracted' by the casting action! Apparently that is a viable defense for almost running down a cyclist, as well.

    BrianMc
    Last edited by BrianMc; 05-19-2012 at 01:26 PM.

  120. #320
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    A little late for the "I need an adjective" thread, but...

    Cyclelicious » Students suspended for biking to school

  121. #321
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    ^
    Follow uo:

    High School Bike Riders Won

    Justice!

    BrianMc

  122. #322
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    Yay!

  123. #323
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    Umm, sorry, not funny around here r+p+k, had to report that one, so we can be welcoming to all. You'll likely get some note about someone complaining, no hard feelings, good on ya, mate.

    On a lighter note...
    Police log from Baxter, MN...
    SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY — At 10:35 p.m. on Friday a woman riding her bike on the 10000 block of Mountain Ash Drive reported hearing what sounded like a raccoon sneeze or a zipper and would like an officer to check on it. An officer checked and didn’t locate either.
    Last edited by mtbxplorer; 05-31-2012 at 02:33 AM.

  124. #324
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    Honorable mention

    Not technically a commuter when it is your line of work but:

    Yahoo! Groups

    Many others picked this up too.

    BrianMc

  125. #325
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    Not sure this constitutes "news" but it's interesting nonetheless:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/05/op...clist.htm?_r=1

  126. #326
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    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  127. #327
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    ^^ Nice - I had not heard of that ban before! I clicked on the fully story and saw this pic - it looks like she's been winter-bikecommuting for years!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post Bike Commuter News-nkorea.jpeg  


  128. #328
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    I have to ride through here tonight to volunteer at the local bike co-op, which is just a block from the site:

    Busy section of Edmonton’s Whyte Avenue closed after truck strikes and kills cyclist

    Acting Insp. Erik Johnson said the cyclist “struck a mirror of a parked truck and lost control. He then fell under the rear wheels of a full cement truck” that was moving. “He was killed instantly.”

    Johnson described the fatality as “just one of those freak accidents that happen from time to time,” and said the driver of the concrete truck “didn’t even realize he had hit the cyclist.”
    I consider it a bad spot, because it's the only place to cross a set of railway tracks. South of there the next crossing is 20 blocks away. North of there has some options, but they're also not terribly safe, and they all require counter-intuitive detours. It's also around the university, so there's a fair amount of bike traffic.

    Edited to add: more from one of our councillors:

    Traffic officers were measuring how far the pickup truck was parked from the curb, which appeared to be more than a foot. Johnson said charges are possible against the driver of the pickup, who sat watching the officers work.

    “It sounds like this collision was a result of everyone just pushing the boundaries of what’s safe,” said Coun. Ben Henderson, who has been working on Edmonton’s bike plans.

    It’s illegal for cyclists to be on the sidewalk. But when they ride on the road, many cyclists hug too close to the parked cars, putting themselves in danger, Henderson said. They should be taking that first driving lane, which is what the city’s new “sharrows” or shared-use lanes indicate on the roads where they’ve been installed.

    There are no shared-use markers on Whyte Avenue, because city plans call for a yet-to-be constructed bike boulevard one block north on 83rd Avenue instead.

    Henderson said the city needs to rethink that plan and probably create a separate bike lane on Whyte Avenue instead, because that’s the most direct route and the one cyclists will be taking anyway.

    “We need to think a little more boldly about this. If you really create good infrastructure where everyone feels safe and is safe using it — and if it gets people where they want to go — then you will get huge usership,” he said. “You don’t want to push the bikes off Whyte. You can’t make the bikes a second-class citizen.”
    Last edited by newfangled; 08-27-2012 at 02:35 PM.

  129. #329
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    So just as a followup to my last post, August's critical mass was dedicated as a memorial ride:



    from Isaak Kornelsen Memorial Ride - August 31, 2012 - a set on Flickr


    from https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...3581649&type=1

  130. #330
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    Nice to see that kind of support for an unfortunate circumstance, although I got distracted by that foolish woman in the second picture riding without a helmet.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  131. #331
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    ^ Show me a picture of her riding at night without lights, or salmon-riding through a stopsign on the sidewalk with no hands, or climbing onto a bike while hammered, or hucking some gnar without a helmet, and I'd agree that there's an issue.

    But vehicular cycling is statistically a very safe activity. And the unfortunate occasions when it's not safe tend to be when helmets won't make any difference.

    She probably wasn't very worried that she'll spontantiously fall on the top of her head from a stationary position, which is what helmets are good for. Given the subject of the memorial ride she may be worried about being run over by a cement truck, but a helmet won't help there. She could even be worried that helmets protect against scrapes but do nothing to protect against rotational injuries and may actually make them worse.

    If she's up on her academic literature (as a good Alberta cyclist), she may have heard that following Alberta's introduction of a mandatory helmet law for those under 18 in 2002, child cycling decreased by 59%, and that while the total number of injuries did fall slightly the rate of injuries/rider more than doubled.

    Or she may just not like helmets. And she's decided that the unlikely safety risks associated with cycling are more than outweighed by the health and lifestyle benefits.

    (Even though I always wear a helmet (and gloves, and glasses) I've got links, and links, and links, and links of helmet stuff if anyone's interested...)

  132. #332
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    Nice to see that kind of support for an unfortunate circumstance, although I got distracted by that foolish woman in the second picture riding without a helmet.
    I didn`t notice her the first time, but now that I went back to look...
    Yup, she distracts me too

  133. #333
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    ___________________________
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post Bike Commuter News-picture1.jpg  

    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  134. #334
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ Show me a picture of her riding at night without lights, or salmon-riding through a stopsign on the sidewalk with no hands, or climbing onto a bike while hammered, or hucking some gnar without a helmet, and I'd agree that there's an issue.

    But vehicular cycling is statistically a very safe activity. And the unfortunate occasions when it's not safe tend to be when helmets won't make any difference.

    She probably wasn't very worried that she'll spontantiously fall on the top of her head from a stationary position, which is what helmets are good for. Given the subject of the memorial ride she may be worried about being run over by a cement truck, but a helmet won't help there. She could even be worried that helmets protect against scrapes but do nothing to protect against rotational injuries and may actually make them worse.

    If she's up on her academic literature (as a good Alberta cyclist), she may have heard that following Alberta's introduction of a mandatory helmet law for those under 18 in 2002, child cycling decreased by 59%, and that while the total number of injuries did fall slightly the rate of injuries/rider more than doubled.

    Or she may just not like helmets. And she's decided that the unlikely safety risks associated with cycling are more than outweighed by the health and lifestyle benefits.

    (Even though I always wear a helmet (and gloves, and glasses) I've got links, and links, and links, and links of helmet stuff if anyone's interested...)
    The reason for a helmet isn't for the foreseeable problems, it's for the stuff that blindsides you. Frankly, I hate wearing a helmet, but I hate preventable severe head injuries even more. Since all those people showed up to memorialize the poor gent, and to accentuate the public's desire for safer riding conditions (to a lesser extent), it bolsters the argument if you show your willingness to do your own part to improving your personal safety with reasonable measures like a helmet.
    That being said, she obviously got on all right otherwise there would have been another news story about her getting banged up during the ride, and one person here or there isn't a big deal. It's just when that guy dies doing nothing wrong (wrong=stupid or illegal), then you see her taking an unnecessary risk, I had to comment.

    End of sermon. Now to pass the collection basket and three chorus's of Bringing in the Sheaf s....
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  135. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    The reason for a helmet isn't for the foreseeable problems, it's for the stuff that blindsides you. Frankly, I hate wearing a helmet, but I hate preventable severe head injuries even more. Since all those people showed up to memorialize the poor gent, and to accentuate the public's desire for safer riding conditions (to a lesser extent), it bolsters the argument if you show your willingness to do your own part to improving your personal safety with reasonable measures like a helmet.
    That being said, she obviously got on all right otherwise there would have been another news story about her getting banged up during the ride, and one person here or there isn't a big deal. It's just when that guy dies doing nothing wrong (wrong=stupid or illegal), then you see her taking an unnecessary risk, I had to comment.

    End of sermon. Now to pass the collection basket and three chorus's of Bringing in the Sheaf s....
    I get your statement, but do you you strap on a helmet after installing a new chain then you tool around the lot for 5 minutes checking shifts?
    If you REALLY do, I say...OK - a bit excessive, but ok.
    Otherwise, you're tilting at windmills
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  136. #336
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    CB`s example isn`t distracting. Besides no helmet, he isn`t riding in a skirt.

  137. #337
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    ^^I think he's standing by his bike, therefore no helmet required.

    I'm in the camp of wear the helmet if you want to. I always do on rides but not to check the chain. I started wearing one when I was mountain biking 25+ years ago and a simple crash that wasn't a big deal ended with my head 2" from a huge rock that could have split my head in half in a minor crash.

    Some hot summer day I'm going to throw caution to the wind and leave my foam hat at home.

  138. #338
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    I get your statement, but do you you strap on a helmet after installing a new chain then you tool around the lot for 5 minutes checking shifts?
    If you REALLY do, I say...OK - a bit excessive, but ok.
    Otherwise, you're tilting at windmills
    Actually I do since the worst OTB I ever had was during a quick ride around the block after work, no big deal, etc.. That was over a year ago and still have the scars on forehead and under my jaw, and lost 2 teeth (nasty all around). Now when I get on the bike, I wear a helmet weather it's a 5min ride or 30miles. Despite how I sound here though, I don't chase people around harping on helmet use and such, except to kids and then only to remind them that it the smart move. I don't nag adults at all, since they are adults (age wise anyway) and should know better, so if they want to risk themselves it's their choice to do so. I do take your point though so I'll leave it alone now.

    I have no problem with women riding in skirts, if anything shorter the better.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  139. #339
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    ^^I don`t much care to see men riding in skirts.
    As as other skirted riders, just imagine how tough it must be even in a short skirt, then compare that to riding in a knee length dress, so its much better for all of us if they keep them short!

  140. #340
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    All's well that end's well:

    Bike Thief Leaves Handwritten Apology Note, Plus $10 for New Lock | ABC News Blogs - Yahoo! News

    Not your usual bike theft story.

    BrianMc

    (Nice one to resurrect this thread.)

  141. #341
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    Haha! Nope, not usual.

    PS: Buy a U-lock

  142. #342
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    That's a good story! I gotta send that story to a couple of friends and prove that ANYTHING is possible, even thieves that are contrite and sent apology notes and restitution before prosecution.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  143. #343
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    Interesting. It won't trigger traffic lights. Not worth stealing? Think of the area on those spokes for reflective treatment! Ride's a bit 'stiff'. I bet.

    Cardboard bicycle can change the world, says Israeli inventor - Yahoo! News

    Consider it low tech carbon fiber, well cellulose fiber, that's carbon, right?

    BrianMc

  144. #344
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    To me it is really hard to believe. There are about 5 unproven technologies that seem to be debuting in this bike.
    -Cardboard Frame - this is the easiest to believe.
    -Recycled tires that could last 10 years. Hmmm, you can't buy a set of ANY tires for less than the price of the whole bike now.
    -"the bicycle will include no metal parts" I am pretty sure I wear my metal bearings out.
    -The cost of the resins alone seem like they would be approaching the $9 cost.
    - What look like cardboard wheels with no way to straighten them. Drawing from my worldly knowledge of entropy, those suckers are going to warp.

    That said: I'd buy one as a novelty. I would want "Trek" to advertise on mine.

  145. #345
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    Blackhawk ban in court

    I almost missed this. The CO Supreme Court heard the case against Blackhawk`s cycling ban last week. It`s going to be several months before their decision is announced, but from the article, things sound pretty good. Cross your fingers, everybody. Tried to find the story on Denver Post or some other non-bike site, but didn`t turn anything up. Don`t know what`s up with that


    High court hears case on bikes on high road | Bicycle Retailer and Industry News
    Recalculating....

  146. #346
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  147. #347
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    "“There is no chance of being hit by the opening door of a parked car or being sideswiped or hit from behind by a moving car,” Teschke told BikeRadar."

    Hmmm. He don't know Indiana drivers, do he? No chance!? Admittedly, they'd have to work at it. But lit up with enough Bud or meth, I wouldn't put it past them.

    BrianMc

  148. #348
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    "“There is no chance of being hit by the opening door of a parked car or being sideswiped or hit from behind by a moving car,” Teschke told BikeRadar."

    Hmmm. He don't know Indiana drivers, do he? No chance!? Admittedly, they'd have to work at it. But lit up with enough Bud or meth, I wouldn't put it past them.

    BrianMc
    or old people who shouldn't be behind the wheel. Last week while I was in Indy, I saw a news story about an old lady who plowed through at least half a dozen wooden privacy fences before parking her car in someone's living room.

  149. #349
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I almost missed this. The CO Supreme Court heard the case against Blackhawk`s cycling ban last week. ...
    Wow.

  150. #350
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    or old people who shouldn't be behind the wheel. Last week while I was in Indy, I saw a news story about an old lady who plowed through at least half a dozen wooden privacy fences before parking her car in someone's living room.
    You mean you missed the doped-up drunk who buried his SUV halfway into a house, ran over a teenager IN THE HOUSE, and was still revving the thing to keep going. WTF was invented for such as this. I guess he mixed up Turn on, tune in, and drop out for Turn in, tune out, and turn in. I always get those mixed up too. Like the elderly woman, another Indianan. Makes me so proud.

    I rest my case. No chance, indeed!

    BrianMc

  151. #351
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    You mean you missed the doped-up drunk who buried his SUV halfway into a house, ran over a teenager IN THE HOUSE, and was still revving the thing to keep going.
    Yep. I did miss that one. I did not watch much TV last week.

  152. #352
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    Nate: Found this. Surprised how many injury lawyers tout their services in Indy. I hope it is hungry lawyers not a sign of the situation.:

    Bicycle Accidents Indianapolis IN - Indianapolis IN, Bicycle Accident lawsuits, Indianapolis IN Bicycle Accident lawyers, Indianapolis IN Bicycle Accident attorneys

    One not so new commuting news from it:

    "The first recorded bicycle accident occurred in 1842 when Kirkpatrick McMillan rode his Velocipede 40 miles to Glasgow, but upon arriving collided with a young girl in the crowd awaiting his arrival."

    Maybe he would have avoided this if he had studs, CB?

    Should be the oldest report in this thread, anyway.

    An interesting statistic:

    "Somewhere between 60%-85% of bicycle accidents involving serious injury are the result of negligence of a motor vehicle driver, whether involved in the accident or not. "

    It's those Indiana drivers!

    BrianMc

  153. #353
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    I dunno about that link, BrianMc. Seems like just a directory of any ol' lawyer. Here's the listing for the city where I live now...30,000 population.

    Bicycle Accidents Nacogdoches TX - Nacogdoches TX, Bicycle Accident lawsuits, Nacogdoches TX Bicycle Accident lawyers, Nacogdoches TX Bicycle Accident attorneys

    same number of listings as for Indy.

  154. #354
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post

    "The first recorded bicycle accident occurred in 1842 when Kirkpatrick McMillan rode his Velocipede 40 miles to Glasgow, but upon arriving collided with a young girl in the crowd awaiting his arrival."
    Damn Strava!
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  155. #355
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    Damn Strava!
    nono

    it's STRAAAAAAVVVVVVAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!! ***CRASH***

  156. #356
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    It reminded me of my only pedestrian strike. Also old news (40 years old).

    I had just crossed the finish line (2nd) of the U of W's ring road relay race as the fourth member of our team, head down out of the saddle and sprinting for the line. I looked up in time to see the student paper's photographer planted dead ahead. The adrenalin-aided braking sent me OTB into her. Observers pushed me back on the bike. Had to ride not to seize up with lactic acid so I don't know how she fared. The whole road was shut down for the race. Guess she missed the memo. I can imagine her looking into the viewfinder. Just a bit closer, just a bit close....er and the Wile E Coyote 'Oh she it" look just before being bowled over by a 6 foot,175 pound, 20+ something mph, tucked cannonball of a cyclist. Another meaning for 'doping', I guess.

    BrianMc

  157. #357
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    He is now a butt of jokes, because Billy got his goat, chased him off road and up a tree without a pedal.

    Paper boy terrorized by a goat, is chased up a tree

    At least it wasn't a buck in rut. Take care, CB.

    BrianMc

  158. #358
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    Paperboys still exist in this world? Maybe there is hope.
    Recalculating....

  159. #359
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    Related to commuting by bike

    The news last night stated that something like 17% of Police accidents are associated with inattentive driving. It isn't just donuts. Its all the electronic stuff.

    Here is German driver with an office in his front seat:

    Jury-rigged mobile office can

    Smart phone records will show you were driving and when. The laptop will time stamps files, too. So the speeding was enough to provide probable cause, yet they did not pursue it.

    MADD may have to be renamed Mothers Against Distracted Driving before enforcement gets serious enough to be a deterrent. It is bad when drivers do it, worse when law enforcement is blowing stop lights and signs because they are reading screens. Serve and protect? Maybe swerve and or wreck.

    BrianMc

    BrianMc

  160. #360
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    FTP!!

    Distracted driving is far worse than drunk driving - and some of you asses reading this do it...grrr!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  161. #361
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    Some of us asses? All drivers drive distracted at least to some extent. The only question is to WHAT extent. For the record, I also fart in elevators.
    Recalculating....

  162. #362
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    I ride distracted more frequently than I drive distracted. You pull up behind this gorgeous hottie with a nice...

    Bike. I was going to say bike.

    It's definitely a real issue. Especially on Black Friday - 3 years ago I was riding in the rightmost lane, a car pulls in to the leftmost lane of a 4 lane road, crosses all 4 lanes and reverses in to me in front of 3 families. Because he was distracted in getting to a sale. The children were pretty traumatized.

    Stay safe out there.

  163. #363
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  164. #364
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    Whoa! Score one for styrofoam!
    Recalculating....

  165. #365
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    I wouldn't want to have to tell that story myself, but it's a good one.

  166. #366
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    Not exactly appropriate for this thread (like I would ever let that stop me from posting), but might be of interest to other little wheel fans, Dr Alex Moulton passed away last Friday.
    Alex Moulton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    http://www.moultonbuzz.com/2012/12/a...ton-1920-2012/

    And to go COMPLETELY off topic, it looks like he was born in the same year as Dave Brubeck, who also lost his pulse last week. Tailwinds to both masters.
    Recalculating....

  167. #367
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    Victim Finds Hit-and-Run Driver
    (still is angering to me ... the sentence )
    Victim Finds Hit-and-Run Driver - Page 1 - News - Los Angeles - LA Weekly

    Famed bicyclist Don Ward tracked lobbyist Glenn Gritzner to a body shop



    Bicyclists have been the loudest critics of the hit-and-run epidemic gripping Los Angeles, a crisis that has been ignored by the mayor and LAPD Chief Charlie Beck. One chilling incident in Echo Park, in particular, galvanized the bike community: the running down of cyclist Don Ward, also known as Roadblock.

    Ward is about as famous as you can get in L.A.'s bike scene because of his 6-foot-8, 225-pound frame and his role as one of the early organizers of Midnight Ridazz, an enormously popular nighttime group ride. He also founded Wolfpack Hustle, which takes high-speed group rides with a somewhat cavalier approach to traffic laws.

    "We've described him, half-seriously, as the bike community's James Dean because of his rugged good looks," says Damien Newton, who runs the website LA Streetsblog. "And he's a little bit of an outlaw."

    In 2009, cycling advocates were getting involved in politics, lobbying for bike lanes — Stephen Box even ran for City Council. But Ward mostly coordinated rides.

    That is, until 1 a.m. on May 19, 2009, when a gray Jaguar slammed into him from behind on Glendale Boulevard in Echo Park, bouncing Ward off the hood — with the mangled bike still attached to Ward due to his clip-on shoes — and catapulting him 50 feet. The Jaguar driver slowed, looked at Ward, then shot off into the night.

    "I looked back, there was this car coming really fast," Ward recalls. "It was scary. It didn't look like the car was in control. I freaked out, just tried to get out of the way."

    As Ward lay on his stomach, he turned his head to watch the Jaguar creep past. That's when he saw the license plate. He began feverishly repeating the numbers aloud.

    Before the crash, Ward had been cycling with friends from whom he'd become separated. One of them, Sean Maytum, came upon Ward's body. "I thought he was dead," Maytum recalls. "He wasn't moving."

    Then Maytum saw his fingers move. Ward was texting. Actually, he was tweeting — the Jaguar's license plate number, of which he clearly remembered the first six digits.

    Ward was banged up but would be OK. From the hospital, he posted about his ordeal on a Midnight Ridazz message board, adding: "I will find this mother****er."

    The next day, Ward called LAPD. He'd already given them a nearly complete plate number, plus the car's color and general description. He was stunned at the disinterest the LAPD investigator showed.

    The officer said, "Yeah, it's gonna take a couple weeks to run down the plate. You could try to find the car if you want."

    As L.A. Weekly reported on Dec. 11, in a four-month investigation by Simone Wilson, "L.A.'s Bloody Hit-and-Run Epidemic," city leaders such as Beck and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa are ignoring, or unaware of, the car-as-weapon crisis in this city.

    In the United States, 11 percent of all car crashes are hit-and-runs. In L.A., an incredible 48 percent are hit-and-runs. The levels are epidemic — 20,000 hit-and-runs inside the city limits annually.

    The mowing down of Don Ward wasn't even a blip in a city where authorities have lost whatever grip they once may have had. But the public is getting angry: Ward's post in 2009 on the Midnight Ridazz message board generated hundreds of responses, including one from DJ Wheels — lawyer Danny Jimenez.

    Jimenez had a friend in the California Highway Patrol who took five minutes, not LAPD's two weeks, to "run down the plate." Of four possible matches, one was a Jaguar registered to Glenn Gritzner, who lived near Silver Lake Reservoir, about two miles from the Echo Park crime scene.

    Ward and Jimenez Googled "Glenn Gritzner" and found a blog site where he reviews bars in downtown L.A. The logo: a martini glass. Then their Internet search turned up something shocking: Gritzner wasn't an illegal immigrant fearing deportation, or a laid-off worker without insurance. He's a well-to-do, high-flying lobbyist and political player in City Hall and Sacramento, a managing director of Mercury Public Affairs, a powerful firm whose top partners include former California Speaker Fabian Nuñez and Adam Mendehlson, former deputy chief of staff to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    Mercury is paid by corporate and union biggies to influence California's politicians; its past clients include Wal-Mart, Blue Shield, even the City of Los Angeles.

    "We were almost 100 percent sure this was the guy," Ward recalls. "We were operating on the premise that the cops were gonna do nothing. We had to get evidence."

    They visited trendy downtown bars, including the Edison and the Standard, hoping somebody had seen Gritzner getting hammered. Nothing. They drove by his house. No gray Jaguar.

    They finally deduced that a man as successful and connected as Gritzner probably would take his Jag in to repair the damage.

    The first place they called was Rusnak, a Jaguar dealer in Pasadena.

    "Yeah, I wanna see if my Jaguar's gonna be ready," Ward said.

    "What's your name?"

    "Glenn Gritzner."

    "Oh yeah, your car's gonna be ready Thursday."

    Ward was tingling. He and Jimenez rushed to Pasadena and found the Jaguar getting a new coat of paint. Its hood and grille had already been replaced.

    Friday morning, May 19, at 7 a.m., three days after he'd been mowed down, Ward walked into the LAPD Traffic Division downtown. It reminded him of his dad's garage. "It was ****ing dingy — stacks of papers everywhere, old computers."

    Ward thought: "No wonder they're not getting anywhere."

    Ward dropped a stack of papers, and a detective looked through them. "Wow, you did the whole thing for us," she said, impressed.

    In the end, Gritzner didn't pay much for his crime and cover-up. He was charged with "misdemeanor property damage" by the L.A. City Attorney, who couldn't get excited about a hit-and-run in which no bones were broken — that would be a felony. According to Ward, Gritzner only had to pay a $500 fine and pick up trash for 30 days.

    Bicyclists have told the mayor, City Council and chief of police that traffic laws are backfiring: If nobody is maimed or left with broken bones, the law imposes a greater penalty on the drunk driver who stops to help than on those like Gritzner, who run, because the runners can't be breathalyzed.

    Ultimately, Ward sued Gritzner, and a private settlement was reached.

    Gritzner, in an email to L.A. Weekly, called the night he fled "unfortunate and chaotic. Although some of the details of what happened that night might be in question, what's not in question is that I should have stopped the car." He insists, "I took responsibility for my actions, and paid my debts both legally and financially. I truly regret what happened, and I am thankful every day that no one was seriously hurt."

    "No one was seriously hurt, huh?" Ward says. For more than a year after he was run down, every time a car approached, he was seized with fear. He was afraid to cross the street. He still tries to stick to side streets.

    "Don changed from the guy who coordinated late-night bike rides to a powerful advocacy voice," Newton says.

    Ward has urged LAPD to stop recommending that speed limits be increased, as the police routinely do, and to make hit-and-runs a high-priority crime. "Getting people off the road that have committed a hit-and-run is a prevention thing," Newton says. "Not only are they dangerous drivers — they're callous about it."
    Last edited by highdelll; 12-31-2012 at 04:14 PM.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  168. #368
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    Wow!

  169. #369
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    Focussing on a couple of the women who cycle year-round in my neck of the woods:

    Edmonton’s winter cyclists peel off layers to transform for work

    EDMONTON - Even when temperatures in Edmonton dip to -20 or lower, they’re still out there: cyclists, all bundled up to stay warm on their trek to the office.

    Two-wheeled commuters are a tough, determined lot, but they’re also creative about how they transition from bike clothes into work clothes.

    And when it’s bitterly cold, as it was last week, cyclists don’t worry about looking pretty when they commute.

    Year-round cyclist Melinda Steenbergen Visser describes her biking-to-work look similar to a “colour-blind bank robber” or “giant second grader.”

    She wears splash pants, a thin down jacket with a hood that she pulls over a fleece balaclava and helmet. And she tucks sheepskin gloves into a teal jacket shell that covers everything.

    “I can bike in -25 in that,” she says. “It’s all good quality stuff, but (on its own), none of it’s very warm. It’s all about layers.”

    When she gets to work, she closes the door to her office and transforms into a public affairs officer for the provincial government.

    She removes the wet layers to reveal a skirt and wool tights. She hangs up the outerwear, then pulls on a pair of heels and she’s ready to go.

    “People think I’m crazy, but I honestly think it’s faster than walking or taking the bus or driving,” she says. “I hear co-workers say it would take them two hours to get home on the days of the storm. I could push my bike there and I would get home faster than that.”

    Visser bikes four kilometres from Westmount to Commerce Place downtown. And this is the first year she’s decided to get serious about biking in the winter — her balaclava has a thin mesh layer over her mouth so she can breathe without letting cold air in.

    Her tires are studded, and she’s got enough reflective gear to be visible at night.

    Dawn Lamothe also cycles in the winter. She owns Lion’s Breath Yoga and Adventure and has cycled to and from work for three years. Her winter cycling outfit resembles a snowboarder with surfer feet.

    She wears black neoprene booties over Keen sandals on her feet, with a wicking under-layer covered by a second layer and a windbreaker pulled over her balaclava and snowboard helmet.

    Thick mittens cover her hands and, when it’s really cold, she adds hand-warmers. Her goggles cover the last bit of skin.

    “I sometimes even wonder if people can tell if I’m a female or a male,” she laughs.

    By the time she bikes the eight kilometres from Strathcona to her studio in Westmount, she’s soaked.

    “Almost everything I have as an under-layer has to come off and dry before I go home,” she says. “And then I use a towel to sop up whatever I have leaking from wherever it’s leaking.”

    She keeps a towel at work, and luckily being a yoga instructor allows for a smooth transition.

    “I think that for people who work in fitness, it’s super easy to be cycling,” she says. “I mean, people expect a yoga teacher to stink in the armpits anyway, so it’s a nice lifestyle that way.”

    Cliff Vallentgoed, the owner of RedBike, says the two most important things to keep in mind with winter commuting are safety and warmth.

    “You want to keep warm but you also want to maintain visibility and mobility,” he says. “So you need to be able to work the brakes and gears. But you also need big clunky mitts to keep your hands warm.”

    He recommends a few different products for this *— heated grips, which are battery-operated warming pads that attach to bike handlebars.

    And if you’re looking for something more affordable, he recommends bar mitts.

    “(Bar mitts) fix to the handlebar and have a big neoprene bag that covers the controls — the brake lever and shift lever. You stick your hand inside there and it provides a really nice wind barrier. And the pocket of still air also provides a bit of insulation.”

    For balaclavas, he recommends one made by a Minnesota company called 45 North — their products have a built-in, flexible face mask that covers the nose and can be pulled up to the goggles. Thanks to special ventilation, it doesn’t fog up goggles.

    RedBike also sells winter-specific cycling shoes that are well insulated and have a vibrim sole that can mount to a cleat.

    If you’re not willing to pay for specialized gear, Vallentgoed recommends layering.

    “Layering up gives you flexibility in terms of being able to cope with different temperatures. It also tends to give you a little bit more insulation because every layer has an inherent air pocket built into it. So you can wear three very thin layers and it tends to be more functional than one very thick layer.”

    Ultimately, biking to work can be cheap, and according to Lamothe, Visser and Vallentgoed, it’s even fun.

    “It’s a lot easier and a lot more fun than most people think,” says Vallentgoed. “It’s something that I would encourage anybody to try. Maybe not on the coldest day, but work your way into it. See for yourself how much more fun it is to bike to work, than to be stuck in your car.”

  170. #370
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    ^^ Nice! Sounds like Wonder Woman...
    She removes the wet layers to reveal a skirt and wool tights. She hangs up the outerwear, then pulls on a pair of heels and she’s ready to go.

  171. #371
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    ^ Everyone knows that us men are crazy and would quite happily do something dumb like riding a bike in the winter. So having articles like this is a good thing.

  172. #372
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    Hey, traffic engineers! Need a way to get bicycles through a busy intersection without any possibility of contact with rolling motor vehicles? No problem- just plop a floating non-motorized roundabout on top of it!
    Spectacular New Floating Cycle Roundabout « BicycleDutch

    Hovenring in Eindhoven, Holland


    Tjensvollkrysset in Stravanger, Norway
    Recalculating....

  173. #373
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    Cleveland studies what it takes to be a "bike swap" city

    Cleveland is about to launch a study of what it would take to become a bike swap city. That means figuring out everything from the kind of bikes to the kinds of people who would ride them.

    WKSU News: Cleveland studies what it takes to be a "bike swap" city

  174. #374
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    Cool story from my neighbors to the south:

    How some committed cyclists paved the way for snow-free Calgary pathways



    In the middle of winter, it’s easy to feel entitled to a bare pathway. In some areas of Calgary, the city’s snow clearing has improved so much that pathways are regularly plowed before the adjacent roads. It’s not a perfect system, but regular winter cyclists have come to expect clear pathways as part of our functioning transportation network.

    But it wasn’t long ago that Calgary’s much vaunted multi-use pathway system wasn’t plowed at all. In fact, it took a small army of volunteers — most of them dedicated cyclists who couldn’t bear the thought of parking their bikes for the season — to keep the paths clear. And in a roundabout way, the expectations those volunteers set up helped usher in today’s network of plowed paths.

    It all goes back to the mid-1990s...
    Continued here: How some committed cyclists cleared the way for clear Calgary pathways | Calgary Herald

  175. #375
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    ^^ Nice story. An interesting transformation from volunteer effort to citizen expectation to city duty.

  176. #376
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    Whoohoo! Cyclists trump RV tourists in Colorado! As reported by DP yesterday:
    Colorado Supreme Court overturns Black Hawk's ban on bikes in city - The Denver Post

    As reported by RyR in November:
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    I almost missed this. The CO Supreme Court heard the case against Blackhawk`s cycling ban last week. It`s going to be several months before their decision is announced, but from the article, things sound pretty good. Cross your fingers, everybody. Tried to find the story on Denver Post or some other non-bike site, but didn`t turn anything up. Don`t know what`s up with that


    High court hears case on bikes on high road | Bicycle Retailer and Industry News
    Recalculating....

  177. #377
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Whoohoo! Cyclists trump RV tourists in Colorado! As reported by DP yesterday:
    Colorado Supreme Court overturns Black Hawk's ban on bikes in city - The Denver Post

    As reported by RyR in November:
    Thank goodness, that was ridiculous. Thanks for the update.

  178. #378
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    Not sure the best place to put this, but the local bike co-op has put together some slides in preparation for some community meetings about on-street bike lanes.

    On the costs of roads – Edmonton Bicycle Commuters' Society

    It's Canada-centric in terms of stats and funding sources, but there's some fun stuff in there.

    And then another one about Edmonton and its lovely weather:

    http://edmontonbikes.ca/weather-in-edmonton/

    The best thing from that is at the end - we've got 265 bike-friendly days/year (which is more than are soccer-friendly or outdoor-skating-friendly, even though we've got plenty of those facilities)

  179. #379
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Not sure the best place to put this, but the local bike co-op has put together some slides in preparation for some community meetings about on-street bike lanes.

    On the costs of roads – Edmonton Bicycle Commuters' Society

    It's Canada-centric in terms of stats and funding sources, but there's some fun stuff in there.

    And then another one about Edmonton and its lovely weather:

    http://edmontonbikes.ca/weather-in-edmonton/

    The best thing from that is at the end - we've got 265 bike-friendly days/year (which is more than are soccer-friendly or outdoor-skating-friendly, even though we've got plenty of those facilities)
    Nice presentations......but as always Edmontons weather sucks....

    Still completely acceptable to bike commute of course.

  180. #380
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    ^ hey now, we're currently sitting at the same temperature that you are.

  181. #381
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    Nice presentation. I like how it addressed the oft-repeated arguments that cyclists don't pay for roads, should be registered, yatta yatta yatta. I also like your point about the facilities that are built for limited use due to weather, sports seasons, etc., whereas $ for bikefastructure is always questioned. My impression is that our skating rinks are pretty booked, but things like football and baseball fields/stadiums languish more days than not.

    If those numbers are right, you have a lot of cyclists up there! Have you met the older Polish mom & US born daughter who MTB? They were on a trip with me in BC and were a real hoot.

  182. #382
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    I don`t see any presentations from home or from work. The link seems to work, but I jsut get something like a poster, no article. Are they supposed to be videos?
    Recalculating....

  183. #383
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    It looked like it would be a vid but was more like a powerpoint presentation (page to page fancified slideshow)

  184. #384
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    Yeah, they're in Prezi format which is hipster-powerpoint. There are arrows at the bottom which let you cycle through, but it also probably needs flash/java/something which might be why it's not working.

  185. #385
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    Hey, the law favored the cyclist - woo hoo!

    ***edit*** see below
    Last edited by highdelll; 02-21-2013 at 08:08 AM.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  186. #386
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    I take it Daniel Scott was a cyclist? If he was, they skipped that part in the article. That was up in your area, Hidelll?
    Recalculating....

  187. #387
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    I may have grabbed the wrong link - lemme try to find it

    ***
    OK, got it - I guess I was too hasty last night

    Man Who Admitted to Killing a Bicyclist Sentenced to Year in Prison | Local News - Home
    Last edited by highdelll; 02-21-2013 at 08:07 AM.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  188. #388

  189. #389
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  190. #390
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    Good article and (as much as I hate to admit it) good for Rahm Emmanuel. Both sides are mad and now a fine is more than a slap on the wrist. The fact that now penalties are gonna cause some pain should (God willing) maybe save some lives/stop injuries, even if it is to save money instead of doing the right thing.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  191. #391
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  192. #392
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    As long as they don't repeat the Big Dig fiasco, maybe Big Pedal?
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  193. #393
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    A BTW article on commuting safety:

    Biking To Work: Healthful Until You Hit A Pothole : Shots - Health News : NPR

    By my calculations, I should be done with any further accidents, given the averages. Or I maybe I'm a curve wrecker.

    My concussion symptoms were indistinguishable from the effects of my heavy metal treatments. Different sorts of head banging, I suppose.

    BrianMc

  194. #394
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    "Helmets prevent 85 percent of brain injuries," says Frederick Rivara, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington who has studied helmets and injury.
    I cannot believe that people still seriously quote that one, single, completely flawed and completely debunked bullshit study. It's entirely garbage, and anyone who is any sort of "expert" on helmet safety should know better.

  195. #395
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    ^ Yeah! I got a concussion in 100% of my helmet-contact accidents! And 0 concussions in three accidents with no helmet. In my study, helmets cause concussions! Crappy study = bad conclusions.

    BrianMc

  196. #396
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    No phone camera lets a possible bike theif go free:

    My run-in with a possible bike thief | Tucson VeloTucson Velo

    BrianMc

  197. #397
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  198. #398
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    And the hits just keep on coming...

    Blog - Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling (FABB)

    BrianMc

  199. #399
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    Are better helmets in our future?

    If helmets prevent 85% of head injuries to cyclists why spend much or any effort to make them better?

    If helmets are only 40 or 50% effective at reducing head injuries, that changes the game plan for helmet mfrs, doesn't it?

    Feds will stop hyping effectiveness of bike helmets - Greater Greater Washington

    My helmet helped, but still rendered unconscious, I suffered worse injuries than if I'd been conscious to keep my face out of the dirt. Safer would be good.

    BrianMc

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