Please recommend pedals for commuting to work- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Please recommend pedals for commuting to work

    My gf just bought her first bike so she can commute back and forth to work. We got her fitted on a Sirrus. I want to get her some pedals but I don't know which ones would work where she could ride to work with regular shoes but clip-in when we go riding together.

    I'd like to find some that would feel comfortable for a lady with size 7 feet
    If any ladies see this post, if you wouldn't mind giving me some links for cute spd shoe companies, please.

  2. #2
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    Shimano SPD-M324?
    In my experience, they allow a little more play than M520's for instance.
    A bit of a hassle to get the right side clipping in, but other than that i like them!

  3. #3
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    Have to agree that some sort of multi use pedal is the best. Years ago I bought Performance's version of the shimano and still use it today on my commuter. Won't use any other type of pedal for my commuter.
    My commute to work is 5 miles each way, so the clip side works great. If my wife wants to go a mile down the road for dinner, the flat side works great.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0180840 View Post
    Shimano SPD-M324?
    In my experience, they allow a little more play than M520's for instance.
    A bit of a hassle to get the right side clipping in, but other than that i like them!
    If you have problems getting in the right side only it must be your Cleat Location or install problem.
    Check you cleat position vs left side



    sm007h the Shimano SPD-M324 would be my suggestion.
    There will be cheaper alternative but for best performance and longevity Shimano would be you best bet.

  5. #5
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    There are women-oriented bike clothes companies, but I can't think of any woman only bike shoe companies. Most of the companies have women's versions, some "cuter" than others (I tend toward the plainer black). She might want to try some on locally to get the fit right. Or if you want to try for an online bargain, maybe Women's Cycling Shoes up to 50% off at Sierra Trading Post

  6. #6
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    I am happy with my decision to put plain plastic pinned platforms on my commuter (cost me $14 at the LBS). I can wear whatever shoes I want to wear, and if I want clipless for a particularly long ride I can just swap pedals. I debated on the dual-use pedals for a little bit, but since I use Crank Bros pedals on my mtb, many are not even an option for me.

    my commute is between 3-5mi depending on the route I choose.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Normbilt View Post
    If you have problems getting in the right side only it must be your Cleat Location or install problem.
    Check you cleat position vs left side.
    The thing is, the heavier side, being the clip side, tends to be on the down side.
    You need to get used to it, eventually you'll automatically flick the pedal around when you want to clip in.

  8. #8
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    Shimano SPD-A530

  9. #9
    jrm
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    I use two sets of pedals

    b/c i dont have a dedicated commuter. I use my CX bike with two different wheelsets. I have one set of flat pedals with power grip straps and a set of time atacs.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0180840 View Post
    Shimano SPD-M324?
    In my experience, they allow a little more play than M520's for instance.
    A bit of a hassle to get the right side clipping in, but other than that i like them!
    That's one reason I was looking at the M424's but I wonder if the mechanism will hurt her feet with regular shoes.

    My old roommate used spd pedals on his touring and I think they had an attachment to convert them into platforms. Those might work better but I can't remember what they were.

    Thanks for the suggestions everyone.

  11. #11
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    Wellgo WAM-D10 Pedals

    I have these on my all around mtn bike/commuter/whatever Kona. They work well with regular turd kickers or cleats. I like being able to ride tricky trail sections unclipped. Generally, if I am going more than a couple miles I will wear my real bike shoes. I keep a pair of regular shoes under my desk at work.

    My sister uses similar pedals. She likes them because she doesn't like being clipped in on even slightly technical terrain.

  12. #12
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    Even if the mechanism itself doesn't hurt your gf's feet, having a really small platform and regular shoes is not a match made in heaven.

    Does she even want clipless pedal shoes? Much as I hate to admit it, gearhead that I am, the performance difference between a relatively stiff running shoe and clips and straps and a clipless pedal system is not that big, and I can't imagine you two are doing anything particularly ambitious right now if she's on a hybrid. (Well, I guess I can. People put in some shockingly long rides on those. My shoulder hurts just thinking about it.) Anyway, I usually commute with clips and straps, and I've been known to do pretty long rides that way too if some other circumstance dictated.

    If you must do it, it sounds like you've had some good suggestions. Personally, asymmetric pedals drive me nucking futs. Although that Wellgo looks a little better.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Even if the mechanism itself doesn't hurt your gf's feet, having a really small platform and regular shoes is not a match made in heaven.

    Does she even want clipless pedal shoes? Much as I hate to admit it, gearhead that I am, the performance difference between a relatively stiff running shoe and clips and straps and a clipless pedal system is not that big, and I can't imagine you two are doing anything particularly ambitious right now if she's on a hybrid. (Well, I guess I can. People put in some shockingly long rides on those. My shoulder hurts just thinking about it.) Anyway, I usually commute with clips and straps, and I've been known to do pretty long rides that way too if some other circumstance dictated.

    If you must do it, it sounds like you've had some good suggestions. Personally, asymmetric pedals drive me nucking futs. Although that Wellgo looks a little better.
    She'll use clipless before she'll use straps. It only comes with the most basic platforms that I don't know if I'd trust to rotate smoothly for longer than...well they probably aren't smooth now

    The way I was looking at it was given the choice between basic/placeholder platforms, upgraded platforms, straps, clipless then the next best thing from the freebies would be to go to symmetrical clipless that lets her ride with her regular shoes to work if she prefers.

    What do you think of that logic? Sound good or should I consider something else? Because she didn't ask for better pedals I just assumed the freebies weren't worth leaving on the bike.

  14. #14
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    First of all, I don't think the pedals are as important as the shoes. Cycling shoes have been around a lot longer than clipless pedals. Clipless pedals are really just a more convenient (much more convenient off-road) alternative to clips and straps, but only for someone who is already committed to wearing shoes that are weird and crappy for everything else.

    Does your girlfriend wear cycling shoes? Does she want to?

    If she's not interested in the shoes, you can rule out clipless pedals right away. I think a lot of beginners, of whichever gender, are turned off by all the extra rigamorale involved in cycling over, say, running or hiking. If she doesn't already change clothes to ride, it's probably a good bet that she doesn't want to have special shoes either. But, ask her.

    It's too bad that a good flat pedal and a good platform pedal for clips and straps aren't the same thing. So it's not a very good plan to get a platform pedal that will accept clips and leave them off as a way of future-proofing, although a friend of mine quite liked the little half-clips without the straps you can get at some catalogs and shops. Anyway, if I thought my girlfriend's bike needed new pedals, I'd be looking at BMX pedals. Maybe some of the plastic ones with nubs or removable pins, preferably little nubs, or maybe some alloy ones with nubs, because I already have them and think they'd be close enough.

    We're talking about a sub-$20 item here. So if she decides she wants to do more with cycling later, you can deal with it then. There's always a use for an extra set of flat pedals. You can always go further upmarket if you want to. Rivendell sells some fancy flat pedals. And there's a ton of fancier DH/FR pedals out there, not all with huge pins.

    You really need to tread lightly when you mess around with other people's gear. Often, the change will annoy the person. At worst, it could be a change that she doesn't like, doesn't understand well enough to fix, and really screws with her riding. (Thinking of a teammate who had her suspension setup "improved" by a well-meaning friend.) Better flat pedals are something you can at least substitute into her current setup without changing how she uses it, so the worst case is it doesn't effect her riding experience and you might actually improve it. Just stay away from pedals that will take a big chunk out of her shin.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
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    I'm in my mid-thirties so while I appreciate the desire to help me out with life and relationships I feel I'd be better served with keeping the thread focused on gear suggestions. Thank you

    @anomad,
    When you write that your sister uses similar pedals do you mean she uses those exact ones or a different model?

    So far the suggestions that match closest to our needs are the wellgo pedals or the pd-m424. If anyone has used both of those and can compare them for me I'd appreciate it. Or if you know of one that's similar to them, please post.

    Thank you everyone for your contributions.

  16. #16
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    Don't get pedals like the PD m424 or the WAM-D10: when you ride with regular shoes for any distance, the "clipless" part in the middle will drive you nuts. As much as I hate the SPD-M324, at least once you have the correct side under your foot it is okay.

    To me, the only way to go on a commuter bike is BMX/platform pedals. I love my Eggbeaters on my mountain bikes and recreational road bikes, but when I am riding around the city on my commuter bike, it't nice to be able to wear regular shoes and walk around once I get off the bike. The difference in performance is a lot less than most people will have you believe.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sm007h View Post
    I'm in my mid-thirties so while I appreciate the desire to help me out with life and relationships I feel I'd be better served with keeping the thread focused on gear suggestions. Thank you

    @anomad,
    When you write that your sister uses similar pedals do you mean she uses those exact ones or a different model?

    So far the suggestions that match closest to our needs are the wellgo pedals or the pd-m424. If anyone has used both of those and can compare them for me I'd appreciate it. Or if you know of one that's similar to them, please post.

    Thank you everyone for your contributions.
    My sisters are like these. (Wellgo WPD-95B Pedals)


    But for the extra 6 or 7 bucks I think the magnesium body and the downhill style platform are a significant improvement (lighter and pins to stabilize regular shoes). I have a pair of these cheaper ones also, on my folding bike friday.

    The clipless mechanism is only on one side on both models. So it doesn't cause discomfort in any way, while using the opposite side.

    Edit to add: My sister has many many miles in dedicated clipless pedals/shoes as an accomplished triathlete many years ago. She just doesn't like them for her casual riding style these days.
    Last edited by anomad; 12-06-2011 at 09:15 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sm007h View Post
    I'm in my mid-thirties so while I appreciate the desire to help me out with life and relationships I feel I'd be better served with keeping the thread focused on gear suggestions. Thank you
    It`s a quarter after four here, and it looked to me like A.S. was discussing gear and bike relations rather than interpersonal relations. Ie: not suggesting anything specific to you and your girlfriend, rather suggesting not making unrrequested decisions about somebody else`s bike. So it looked to me, anyway.

    "Sound good or should I consider something else? Because she didn't ask for better pedals I just assumed the freebies weren't worth leaving on the bike."

  19. #19
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    I hope I'm not delving into personal relationship advice, but here are my thoughts:

    1) if it is her first bike and she's just getting started riding, don't worry about clipless yet. IMO, people go to clipless way too early, have crashes and problems, and don't want to ride anymore for fear of the stupid pedals. She shouldn't go clipless until she is completely comfortable with all other aspects of riding, eg, which brake is which, how to stop and land on the same foot every time, getting up and down driveway lips, rr tracks, and all that (don't laugh -- there are always threads over on RBR to the effect of "how do I stop with my left foot down all the time"). The danger and risk of going clipless far outweigh the benefits for the new rider IMO. FWIW, I tried the dual-sided platform/spd for a while several years back, and didn't like them very much. I was more comfortable just going full on one way or the other.

    2) if she's an experienced rider, or is comfortable clipping in, why the need to ride unclipped? Sure, true road pedals are a pain. But I commute in my Shimano M077 mtb shoes w/ A520 pedals. The shoes have a rubber sole surrounding the spd cleat, which means I can walk just fine on the tile floors in my office or wood floors at home. I'm fine stopping in to the bank or store if necessary (the spandex is more of my concern there!). I even lift weights in them for about 20 minutes in the gym before I shower and head to work. I wear them pulling the kids in the trailer on the bike path (and can drive to and from the house in them just fine). The shoes/pedals also work great on long rides, centuries, and other true cycling uses.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by anomad View Post


    Wellgo WAM-D10 Pedals

    I have these on my all around mtn bike/commuter/whatever Kona. They work well with regular turd kickers or cleats. I like being able to ride tricky trail sections unclipped. Generally, if I am going more than a couple miles I will wear my real bike shoes. I keep a pair of regular shoes under my desk at work.

    My sister uses similar pedals. She likes them because she doesn't like being clipped in on even slightly technical terrain.
    I have those on my commuter bike and have been very happy. Plenty of space when riding with regular shoes, easy to clip into and out of.

  21. #21
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    Bike shops have little plastic pieces that clip into SPD or Crank Bros pedals that make them flat pedals. They use them for test rides.

    I wouldn't expect them to last a really long time, but it might be an option for you. You can probably pick up a set or two from the bike shop for free or really cheap.

    If you want something that is meant to last a bit longer go with the Winwood Deckster adapters
    Winwood Decksters Platform Clip-Ons at JensonUSA.com
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