Paved trail mtb riding?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Paved trail mtb riding?

    Does anyone else also ride they're MTB on paved trails? I do when dirt trails are closed, but have noticed something. It seems when ever I do I get a snub nose by all the road bikers. Does anyone else experience this ?

  2. #2
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    I run my hardtail XC bike(s) on paved trails quite often. And road quite often.
    Haven't really noticed roadies other than them flying to and fro, with the occasional head nod.

  3. #3
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    Dont worry about it. I learned a while back old roadies have an issue with mountain bikers. Im a member of the local "roadie" club too cause I have a few friends there and they do good things here. But start discussing riding off road and several get really pissy. Dont ask me what or why, just do.

    But its few overall so nothing to worry about.

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  4. #4
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    I just had to come here to see what paved trails were. It seemed like some kind of oxymoron. Like city camping.

    I'm surprised there are any snobby roadies on a paved trail. I avoid them most of the time when I'm on a road bike. Too slow, too narrow, too many people to go around, too many dogs on leashes.

    I'm always friendly even if others aren't. Eventually it rubs off.

  5. #5
    RAKC Industries
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    Here we have tons of paved "trail". Exactly what its called. Great River Trail being the longest one near me.

    By definition a trail applies to both paved and unpaved.

    So what wouldnt be an oxymoron when referring to a paved MUT?

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Here we have tons of paved "trail". Exactly what its called. Great River Trail being the longest one near me.

    By definition a trail applies to both paved and unpaved.

    So what wouldnt be an oxymoron when referring to a paved MUT?

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    Read the first post? Rides paved trails when the dirt ones are closed. Ya know, a paved bike path. Just ignore the roadies, all they care about is matching kit and being a stravanerd. I ride my commuter when going paved.

  7. #7
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    I didn't intend to start a debate, LOL. I just associated trails with unpaved paths especially when he was talking about mountain biking. The whole "Rail Trail" thing changed the definition of trail to include paved ones. If I think of it our "Mountain Division Trail" is actually paved.

    In any case, the message is the same. Ignore arrogant cyclists whether they are on road bikes, mountain bikes or commuter bikes. I don't like to label any group as a whole. That would be the same as all the people in cars that label all cyclists scofflaws that run red-lights and don't obey any traffic laws.

    I took the dirt kind of trail today with not another human soul in sight, it was wonderful!

    Cheers,

    Stravanerd

  8. #8
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    Oh no wasnt a debate at all. Was curious because honestly different parts of the country tend to use slightly different terms.

    And I like the term oxymoron, it applies to so many of the dumb things that people come up with to do (your reference to city camping be a great example)

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  9. #9
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    Sorry for the confusion. I appreciate all types of riders and see it as one big hobby no matter the bike style. Occasionally there will be a nice one.

  10. #10
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    I ride the fat bike wherever I feel like. I don't notice road-bike riders much. I'm too busy having fun.

  11. #11
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    Not wrong at all. Thanks for not being the guy riding the trails when they're way too wet.

    I have to admit when reading "paved trail" I got confused and then almost immediately realized the term is "sidewalk".

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Like city camping.
    Seems pretty common in Portland these days.

    I wear my mtb helmet/jerseys/gloves on my road bike rides. I definitely get some looks from roadies now & again. Never any attitude per say, more a once over like they're sizing me up or trying to figure me out. Either way it's fun to drop them. I have nothing but encouragement for anybody trying to enjoy themselves, exercise or whatever.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShepard1975 View Post
    ... Occasionally there will be a nice one.
    That is a little sad.

    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    I have to admit when reading "paved trail" I got confused and then almost immediately realized the term is "sidewalk".
    . Like the Appalachian Sidewalk or the Pacific Crest Sidewalk or the Inca Sidewalk.

    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Seems pretty common in Portland these days.

    I wear my mtb helmet/jerseys/gloves on my road bike rides. I definitely get some looks from roadies now & again. Never any attitude per say, more a once over like they're sizing me up or trying to figure me out. Either way it's fun to drop them. I have nothing but encouragement for anybody trying to enjoy themselves, exercise or whatever.
    Same here. I've got the same "kit" for MTB, commuting or group rides. Road shorts, Merino wool commuter shirt (Giro New Road or similar) and whichever helmet has the right mounts or whatever without regard for whether it has a visor or not.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    . Like the Appalachian Sidewalk or the Pacific Crest Sidewalk or the Inca Sidewalk.
    I can't tell what you're trying to say here. Pretty sure none of those are paved.

  15. #15
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    It was a joke. When somebody says "trail" I get the image of an unpaved path that is blazed or worn like these classic trails.

    I guess "Rail Trail" sounds a lot better than "Rail Sidewalk" It's all about marketing.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    It was a joke. When somebody says "trail" I get the image of an unpaved path that is blazed or worn like these classic trails.

    I guess "Rail Trail" sounds a lot better than "Rail Sidewalk" It's all about marketing.
    haha, right? I think I need a new bike for these new black diamond smooth "trails".

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Same here. I've got the same "kit" for MTB, commuting or group rides. Road shorts, Merino wool commuter shirt (Giro New Road or similar) and whichever helmet has the right mounts or whatever without regard for whether it has a visor or not.
    I also wear my MTB kit when riding...baggy shorts, generic shirt, merino wool in the winter, MTB shoes, helmet with visor. I find the majority of "roadies" are pretty polite around here, but every once in a while I'll run into a jerk who takes a look at what I am wearing and seems to assume I cannot ride a road bike.

  18. #18
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    Maybe the road bikers (roadies?) get pissed because a-holes like me use the paved path to practice manuals.


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  19. #19
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    I have never owned a "paved trail specific" bike, so I guess I always ride on paved trails with my MTB's or my BMX. It is more funny to ride my Krampus on the paved trails because I always get really funny looks. And if the comments aren't rooted in curiosity, it is almost always " that's a lot of bike for this trail", or something to that extent.

    Like some have mentioned though, I really avoid riding multi-use paved traisl b/c they are usually too full of "meandering" users. My fiance won't ride dirt trails due to a massive MTB accident, but she still likes to ride, so that is the only time I do get on them...and then we try to ride in "off" hours/times.

    i did turn my old Trek 830 into a commuter though...really just by putting Schwalbe Marathon tires on it when my step kids aren't riding it as a MTB. (It has Conti Trail Kings on when it is a MTB).
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  20. #20
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    Around here in south Denver, I've discovered about 50/50 mix of roadies when I'm riding my 29er HT (wearing MTB gear - very noncycling like) on a paved trail. Half will wave/nod/give a peace sign - the other half? Snobs who wouldn't acknowledge a fellow rider heading the opposite direction, even if they were wearing a purple with lime green polka-dotted gorilla costume.

    Ride to have fun and wave to fellow cyclists. If they plainly ignore you, just chalk it to them being super uptight arses.

  21. #21
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    A bit like Harley riders. So funny that they think they are superior.

  22. #22
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    We use them to get from trail to trail sometimes. In inclement weather/winter the MUP's get plowed before the roads do, seriously! So, we have a few good loops made out in order to get miles in if all the trails are not rideable.
    The member formerly known as Redtires....

  23. #23
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    I ride a giant XTC 3 hardtail on the rail trails all over Michigan. I dont care about the roadies. They seem pretty friendly around here.

  24. #24
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    I have a 'paved trail' near where I live. I just moved so it's REAL near. .03 of a mile to be exact. It's called the Centennial Trail and includes some road and some multi use paved trail. It has a speed limit of 15 mph tho. With smooth tires on my MTB that's a comfortable pace for the distance I'm using it. I haven't seen many other peeps, but I stay away on sunny weekends. That's amateur hour. No thanks
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  25. #25
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    I ride my MTB on roads regularly for fitness, and I'm sure the road bikers enjoy having someone to pass, but other than that I have never had any issues or sensed any hostility. Occasionally, I joke with them as they pass. Less often, I pass them, but someone on a road bike I can pass on my mountain bike is not very fit. Road bikes are just much faster.

  26. #26
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    Ya know, of all the "roadies" that I've known over the years, and I'm talking dozens of CAT1 and CAT2 guys (of which I was not one), I can only think of one guy offhand who didn't also ride a mountain bike.

    Just throwing that out here.
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  27. #27
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    At $80 a pop for my 29er tires, I try to stay off pavement as much as possible.

    We have a paved "Rails to Trails" system that runs parallel to my street and goes for miles. If the entire family rides, I have no choice but to ride my bike. If my wife or my oldest daughter aren't riding, I will take their old rigid 26" bike.
    AreBee

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arebee View Post
    At $80 a pop for my 29er tires, I try to stay off pavement as much as possible.

    We have a paved "Rails to Trails" system that runs parallel to my street and goes for miles. If the entire family rides, I have no choice but to ride my bike. If my wife or my oldest daughter aren't riding, I will take their old rigid 26" bike.
    yeah, that is the reason I set up my old 26er as a paved specific bike. Hate to wear down the knobbys on the tar!
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    yeah, that is the reason I set up my old 26er as a paved specific bike. Hate to wear down the knobbys on the tar!
    "But honey, I NEED a bike for paved and another for trails. And, and one with full suspension and another with just a shock fork and another for....."
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    "But honey, I NEED a bike for paved and another for trails. And, and one with full suspension and another with just a shock fork and another for....."
    yeah. Unfortunately, she collects almost nothing. She owns 3 pairs of shoes. Has worn the same North Face coat for 20 years or so. One purse. I can't use the "but I need another" argument with her, because she never does that with me....

    Luckily, as mentioned before, she never questions my purchases. Most of our bills are in order, and I really don't spend much on frivolous stuff b/c I have always been poor. I have pretty much lived paycheck to paycheck my whole life. I have learned to make things last (hence my 30 year old BMX), and to buy things that last. When I do splurge it is usually under $100. My Krampus was my first MTB since 1994. And that 1994 is still my commuter/paved trail bike
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    yeah. Unfortunately, she collects almost nothing. She owns 3 pairs of shoes. Has worn the same North Face coat for 20 years or so. One purse. I can't use the "but I need another" argument with her, because she never does that with me....
    You're indeed lucky in that respect. I've heard, "No you have to wait because I 'need' my hair done and my skin exfoliated"
    That's a large part of the reason I'm now single.
    But I usually only have one bike, my OlMarin I got in '92. AND I started with a 2 year old frame. I do have another bike for running errands in town. Old, ugly road bike. Won't mind too much if it's stolen.
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    You're indeed lucky in that respect. I've heard, "No you have to wait because I 'need' my hair done and my skin exfoliated"
    That's a large part of the reason I'm now single.
    But I usually only have one bike, my OlMarin I got in '92. AND I started with a 2 year old frame. I do have another bike for running errands in town. Old, ugly road bike. Won't mind too much if it's stolen.
    I have been very lucky to have never dated someone who put the kibosh on things that I do. I am also very up front with the women I do date and say "here I am. this is not going to change, so get out now if you don't like it". Most have gotten out. Or not even started, but 3 have tried, and this one has decided it is not so bad.

    Honestly, i don't think I could own more bikes than what I have. I would not want to have 5 or 6 not being used constantly. I am the same with my basses. I own 3. Most of my buds own 10 or 11...and still use 2 or 3 "main" ones. To me, more than 3 is crazy.

    Our guitar player owns 35 guitars....holy crap!

    I feel like with my one Krampus, I can ride all of the styles that I need by adjusting with my body, or being able to use the bikes versatility in set ups as well. That is how I grew up riding BMX. One bike. One geometry. Many different riding situations. My body was the variable....the gears and suspension. I guess I still live in that world.
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  33. #33
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    I was just an hour ago telling my wife I wanted to buy street tires for my bike, her response NO I'm paying bills. Lol oh well.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I have been very lucky to have never dated someone who put the kibosh on things that I do. I am also very up front with the women I do date and say "here I am. this is not going to change, so get out now if you don't like it". Most have gotten out. Or not even started, but 3 have tried, and this one has decided it is not so bad.

    Honestly, i don't think I could own more bikes than what I have. I would not want to have 5 or 6 not being used constantly. I am the same with my basses. I own 3. Most of my buds own 10 or 11...and still use 2 or 3 "main" ones. To me, more than 3 is crazy.

    Our guitar player owns 35 guitars....holy crap!

    I feel like with my one Krampus, I can ride all of the styles that I need by adjusting with my body, or being able to use the bikes versatility in set ups as well. That is how I grew up riding BMX. One bike. One geometry. Many different riding situations. My body was the variable....the gears and suspension. I guess I still live in that world.
    I thought you were a drummer?
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  35. #35
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    I put urban tires on, pump up to 65psi, and keep up with the roadies, even joined their club. The ones that are snobby no one in the club likes or willingly choose to ride with. I hang out with the rest.

    Nothing pisses off a snobbish roadie more than forming a small peleton to drop the weak riders, only to find a fat guy on a mountain bike in his breakaway group.

    Speaking of 'roadies', the leader of the Louisville Ironman was 2/3 of the way through the bike (110mi) and maintaining a 27mph average. Got to respect some of the roadies, they are committed well beyond what is humanly possible for most.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    I put urban tires on, pump up to 65psi, and keep up with the roadies, even joined their club. The ones that are snobby no one in the club likes or willingly choose to ride with. I hang out with the rest.

    Nothing pisses off a snobbish roadie more than forming a small peleton to drop the weak riders, only to find a fat guy on a mountain bike in his breakaway group.

    Speaking of 'roadies', the leader of the Louisville Ironman was 2/3 of the way through the bike (110mi) and maintaining a 27mph average. Got to respect some of the roadies, they are committed well beyond what is humanly possible for most.
    That's crazy.

  37. #37
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    I don't usually like riding with other people. I've been mainly riding my gravel/touring/commuter bike around with 700x48c slicks and gym clothes. I like to nod or raise fingers to people just to see who will acknowledge me.

    When riding my Otso in baggy clothes? No one.
    When riding my Bianchi in a full Bianchi Nalini kit? F'n every roadie and wanna be roadie in the world.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    You're indeed lucky in that respect. I've heard, "No you have to wait because I 'need' my hair done and my skin exfoliated"
    That's a large part of the reason I'm now single.
    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I have been very lucky to have never dated someone who put the kibosh on things that I do. I am also very up front with the women I do date and say "here I am. this is not going to change, so get out now if you don't like it". Most have gotten out. Or not even started, but 3 have tried, and this one has decided it is not so bad.

    Honestly, i don't think I could own more bikes than what I have.
    Count me as another who has always been up front about who I am and what I like to do. I ended up marrying the one who wanted to join me riding. We're both pretty frugal when it comes to buying most things. We appreciate good food, so we do spend some money on that. We have been known to go out and have meals that easily exceed $100, but we limit those sorts of things to special occasions maybe a couple times a year at most. Usually, it means buying good quality ingredients and cooking at home. We like to cook.

    We take turns buying new bikes. With 2 of us, we do have to put limits on how many we keep around. Right now, my wife has 3 bikes and I have 2. My wife got a new bike most recently, so it's my turn. I'm not "allowed" to buy one yet because we just blew through our savings buying a house. The compromises I make, eh?

    3 each is probably our limit, though. I still have to figure out how we're going to store/organize the garage with the ones we have. I would like to get the selection of bikes on my side of things to look like this: road/gravel bike, AM hardtail, 140-160mm FS. My wife's looks like this and at this point, she is happy with it: road/gravel bike, 100mm FS, 140mm FS. For me, the AM hardtail is going to be my next. After that, I'm going to work on replacing my FS fatbike with the longer travel FS. I think I'd like the HT and the FS to both be boost bikes capable of 29er/27.5+ wheels. That way, I could have one of each set of wheels I could swap between bikes and effectively have 4 different combos depending on how I'm feeling.

    The roadies who get their chamois in a bunch for showing up to ride on something different aren't the ones you want to hang out with. In most places, there should be at least a subset of folks who are cool with riding whatever you've got. I found a nice crew of folks like that in Indianapolis when I lived there. They did all kinds of urban/paved path type rides and folks just rode whatever. There'd be road bikes, mtb's, old cruisers, hybrids, all sorts of stuff. Some of the groups would intentionally include stuff that would severely limit the ability of traditional road bikes to hang - not in order to exclude roadies specifically, but because they had fun doing that kind of riding. There was an underground culvert for a small creek that was big enough to ride in for a few miles. Dirt railroad access roads, cutting through vacant lots, etc. Haven't found a crew like that in Asheville where I live now. There's definitely not nearly as nice of a network of greenways to allow you to access large parts of the city. Though there's a lot more gravel you can ride out in the forests if the trails are too wet. And there's the Blue Ridge Parkway.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I thought you were a drummer?
    I am, but bass is my "second love". Started drumming in 1st grade and playing bass in 7th. Probably the Rush influence...
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  40. #40
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    It seems that riding a bicycle in many areas has a lot of complicated things to worry about and protocols to follow.
    Last edited by Cuyuna; 10-23-2017 at 04:36 AM.

  41. #41
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    I ride paved paths a bit mostly as a connective link to the trail systems around town.
    Rarely see a road bike on them but I wouldn't let anyone else's attitude (biker, jogger, walker) bother me.

    IMO, being outside and getting some exercise or bicycling ought to bring out the best in people but maybe some are having a bad day or they're always an a**wipe.
    bachman must spread some Reputation around before giving it to himself again. :madman:


  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShepard1975 View Post
    Does anyone else also ride they're MTB on paved trails? I do when dirt trails are closed, but have noticed something. It seems when ever I do I get a snub nose by all the road bikers. Does anyone else experience this ?
    I was getting ready to take my son to little league Saturday morning and pulled out an orange shirt that was stuffed in a drawer for at least 3 months. I chose this shirt to show support for the Astros.

    I get downstairs and my wife cannot believe that I am going out in public in this shirt. It's clean, but I had stuffed it in the drawer months ago instead of neatly folding and it is wrinkled--badly.

    I was in the sun for 2 hours in this shirt and when I got home I told her "see, the sun got rid of the wrinkles."

    So my advice to you is to wear wrinkled clothes for a few days in public, and you will soon feel liberated and immune to the opinions of others (complete strangers by the way) out on the paved trails.


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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    It seems that riding a bicycle in many areas has a lot of complicated things to worry about and protocols to follow.
    it's not as complicated as you make it out to be. jerks will be jerks, and cool people will be cool. it's your choice who you spend time with and how you interact with everyone else.

  44. #44
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    It doesn't seem unusual to me and with decades at it I do not care what other people think.

    When I got an original StumpJumper in 1981 it was a lot better than the flimsy wheels with tubular tires my road bike had. I've supported kids digging jumps and pump tracks for years to see quite a few only have a DJ, hard tail or BMX bike they use for work and school as much as fun. My son rides a 29r MTB for everything. He'll go to a 30+ mile road ride. It's what he's got.

    We sold our family commuter 11 months ago for a 2nd fatty so a fat bike or MTB have been doing commuter duty for a year. With a recent Fargo purchase you might still say I'm doing paved trail MTB riding but a Fargo is pretty fast with the right tires.
    ƃuoɹʍ llɐ ʇno əɯɐɔ ʇɐɥʇ

  45. #45
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    If you're weirded out by the protocols of cycling dress codes, check out people's reactions to playing baseball while wearing hockey gear.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    it's not as complicated as you make it out to be. jerks will be jerks, and cool people will be cool. it's your choice who you spend time with and how you interact with everyone else.
    I'm fine with no interaction, response, concern or worry of the jerk-kind but just now thinking different.
    It might be fun to acknowledge the pucker-face, elitist d-weed or what ever term best fits their demeanor. Maybe I'll look 'em straight in the eye and say;

    "Yeah well if I worried about what others thought, I'd be riding a nicer bike !"

    Hell, maybe they'll even loosen up and laugh a bit.
    bachman must spread some Reputation around before giving it to himself again. :madman:


  47. #47
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    Meh i stick to MTBs mostly because i consider them all terrain bikes but if i am riding on paved trails or tarmac i would swap out for commuter friendlier tires and lock the front fork and that's it haha

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    I put urban tires on, pump up to 65psi, and keep up with the roadies, even joined their club. The ones that are snobby no one in the club likes or willingly choose to ride with. I hang out with the rest.

    Nothing pisses off a snobbish roadie more than forming a small peleton to drop the weak riders, only to find a fat guy on a mountain bike in his breakaway group.

    Speaking of 'roadies', the leader of the Louisville Ironman was 2/3 of the way through the bike (110mi) and maintaining a 27mph average. Got to respect some of the roadies, they are committed well beyond what is humanly possible for most.
    this

    roadie gives me the stink eye he'd better have eaten his wheaties that day, I'll drop the hammer, pass... let him suck my wheel, then when he thinks he can take me I'll actually start to try ....and smoke 'em.

    NOTE: this was back in the day of my 2x11 or 3x10, now with a 1x11 I might max out at 25mph and not be able to pull this off
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    roadie gives me the stink eye he'd better have eaten his wheaties that day, I'll drop the hammer, pass... let him suck my wheel, then when he thinks he can take me I'll actually start to try ....and smoke 'em.

    All of them or just the ones that are slower than you?

    These snobby roadie threads bemuse me, I give a wave or hello to every rider and probably half or more respond in some way. The ones who don't are evenly divided between mtb's, roadies and cruisers and I just figure they probably either have ear buds or are zoned out or maybe just focused on their workout, never does it cross my mind that they might be judging my clothes or my bike and it never affects me one way or the other.

    I think if someone is constantly getting negative responses they might consider the possibility that they're projecting.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShepard1975 View Post
    It seems when ever I do I get a snub nose by all the road bikers. Does anyone else experience this ?
    Yes. For years I use a mountain bike with slick tyres for road riding. Where I live is very popular with roadies, I see hundreds of them, and I reckon that at least half of them would blank you. One guy passed on a bend on a very quiet road, almost within touching distance and still ignored me when I said hello. I can see no conclusion other than the fact that some roadies are stuck-up, ignorant sods.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    I can see no conclusion other than the fact that some roadies are stuck-up, ignorant sods.

    The same can be said for the general population.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    All of them or just the ones that are slower than you?

    These snobby roadie threads bemuse me, I give a wave or hello to every rider and probably half or more respond in some way. The ones who don't are evenly divided between mtb's, roadies and cruisers and I just figure they probably either have ear buds or are zoned out or maybe just focused on their workout, never does it cross my mind that they might be judging my clothes or my bike and it never affects me one way or the other.

    I think if someone is constantly getting negative responses they might consider the possibility that they're projecting.
    Good answer! Hey J.B. Weld, do you fix everything?

    I try to wave or wave back to all cyclists (we're pretty spread out here so there aren't that many). Most acknowledge my and I mostly acknowledge them. If I don't it's because I'm concentrating on not ending up in the ditch because of the glass in the road and the car passing too close or maybe I'm thinking about how much work sucked.

    I tend to think of all cyclists as equal. They are just getting out there and enjoying bikes. Except people on E-bikes F--K them. (Just kidding. I'll probably be on one myself when my knees give out.)

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    All of them or just the ones that are slower than you?

    These snobby roadie threads bemuse me, I give a wave or hello to every rider and probably half or more respond in some way. The ones who don't are evenly divided between mtb's, roadies and cruisers and I just figure they probably either have ear buds or are zoned out or maybe just focused on their workout, never does it cross my mind that they might be judging my clothes or my bike and it never affects me one way or the other.

    I think if someone is constantly getting negative responses they might consider the possibility that they're projecting.
    ALL OF THEM

    no really, back in my racing days only sometimes I get some sort of snot-eye from a roadie when I was on the mup, so if I was feeling good, I'd tuck in and wait and see if they would try to drop me. back when I was all things racing, no one*** could drop me off the wheel if I was on my mtb....and if they were less than a stellar roadie, I could take lead and drop them off my mtb wheel.

    [*** no one I ran up to, and some of these were MIT or Harvard team riders. but I was superfit back then too ...only the superfit can keep up with superfit mind you]

    now that I am fat and old
    MAYBE there is one, maybe two roadies on earth I cannot do that to

    --
    no...of course I am full of it. all kidding aside, if you are fast, then go drop that roadie. if you aren't into this 'pretend racing' then ignore it all and just ride.

    if you are into 'pretend racing' then by all means show that roadie what you are made of, or eat shit trying.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    The same can be said for the general population.
    Na, roadies are special.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    "But honey, I NEED a bike for paved and another for trails. And, and one with full suspension and another with just a shock fork and another for....."
    9 bikes are just enough for me.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShepard1975 View Post
    Does anyone else also ride they're MTB on paved trails? I do when dirt trails are closed, but have noticed something. It seems when ever I do I get a snub nose by all the road bikers. Does anyone else experience this ?
    I believe it is your perception.

    I do not experience this, especially because I am passing most people on road bikes. You don't get waves from road bikes often because they are mostly uncomfortable getting off the drops or hoods to wave. I used to take it a litte persona. If you nod, you will usually get nods. I usually get nods from head on serious road ride groups of 4-6 more frequently than some solo rider.

    I am in lycra these days on all of these types of rides, I am not sure if this helps with acknowledgment. I have made a few friends hammering and trading pulls with some quicker Roadies, but I am going too fast on these types of rides for a Casual roadie to want to hang on usually. I would get smoked by the fast guys on their road bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    if you are into 'pretend racing' then by all means show that roadie what you are made of, or eat shit trying.
    Ha, If you are going to let your sack hang and pass someone serious, you have got to be prepared to ride of the front and not let up for a while.

    Nothing worse than being a jerk trying to drop someone who is out getting slow base miles that day.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShepard1975 View Post
    I was just an hour ago telling my wife I wanted to buy street tires for my bike, her response NO I'm paying bills. Lol oh well.
    I put slicks on my Bike. They were Barely any faster than my 2.35 knobbies. It was extremely disappointing. My perception is that they roll extremely fast in the under 16mph range. But I wasn't able to push my average speeds from 18 suddenly up to 19 or 20. Extremely hilly routes with a slower average MPH. I did notice a difference of about 1 mph. Its not worth it for the loss of shenanigan capabilities of my regular 2.35 knobbies.

  58. #58
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    Uh, sure, if you high pressure your knobbies, they will roll well (hence your 18mph average), but you may experience vibration, the knobs will wear quickly, and traction will suffer.

    When people mention switching to slicks it's because no one puts more than 35psi in a trail tire, and most a lot less than that. The idea is to get a set of urban tires that are rated for 60-80psi, and those will roll a lot faster than a trail tire at 15-25psi.

    Some trail tires designed for hard pack are nearly urban tires, so there's that as well.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  59. #59
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    I have a tight small block knobbie pattern on my rigid bike that works well on almost all the trails and rolls quite smooth on hardpack and paved surfaces. I think it's the Performance Bike house brand tire; Forte and called a Tsali. They were usually around $25 or $26 and sometimes on sale at $19. I've seen them reviewed by a lot of users that like the more universal appeal for many applications.

    There are a number of bigger name tires out there using that close smaller knobbie so you can go big name and get some other choices as well.
    bachman must spread some Reputation around before giving it to himself again. :madman:


  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    Uh, sure, if you high pressure your knobbies, they will roll well (hence your 18mph average), but you may experience vibration, the knobs will wear quickly, and traction will suffer.

    When people mention switching to slicks it's because no one puts more than 35psi in a trail tire, and most a lot less than that. The idea is to get a set of urban tires that are rated for 60-80psi, and those will roll a lot faster than a trail tire at 15-25psi.

    Some trail tires designed for hard pack are nearly urban tires, so there's that as well.
    Assuming you are responding to me...

    I average 17-18 mph with low 20s PSI in my 2.35 Hans Dampf and Ikons. these are 700-800 gram tires. I get about 1500 miles out of an Ikon rear, and 2500 out of the HD front.

    I bought Schwalbe Big ones 500 gram slicks (which are a little scary at 30 PSI) ran them at 40 and 45 psi as recommended. They feel remarkably faster at low and moderate speeds, one pedal stroke will send you gliding down the block. At high speeds, there is marginal improvement at best over many rides. I am chalking this one up to aerodynamics at 18-21 mph, which is how fast I am going once I get off the gravel.

    Just examples, not proof by any means.
    knobbies in the summer: https://www.strava.com/activities/11...86#27985401372
    Slicks in the fall: https://www.strava.com/activities/12...46#30837070251

    On hilly routes where I search out every 10%+street hill, I do see a jump in average speed, but nothing earth shattering. I'd still rather have an armored XC tire on so I can hit a side trail and rip it at any time.

    If I did an organized gran fondo or a 100miler with a group, I would put the slicks back on. Or maybe just run a crazy fast XC tire?

  61. #61
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    The Ikons have a higher block density and lower block size than I was imagining. I'm used to a greater spacing and taller block, like DHEA. I've got some Mezcal's that would probably roll ok on the street, but I wouldn't waste them there.

    Damn. Big Ones are some pretty large tires to run on the street at high speed, at 30psi. My largest hard pack/street tire is the Vittoria Evolution at 1.9". It does fine on the trail at 20-30 psi, but on the street it gets 65psi. I care not for a squirrelly tire when hitting 30+mph on a twisty road. Takes a better skillset than mine.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShepard1975 View Post
    Does anyone else also ride they're MTB on paved trails? I do when dirt trails are closed, but have noticed something. It seems when ever I do I get a snub nose by all the road bikers. Does anyone else experience this ?
    I have a 29 HT that I use almost exclusively as a road bike to get in rides during the week when I don't have time to get out on the trails. Being a generally outgoing and friendly type, it definitely bugs me how many roadies I run into who refuse to acknowledge my existence. I had one a few weeks past who came around a slow corner in a residential area, stared me straight in the eye as I voiced, "hello", yet only continued to stare until we were past each other.

    Someone on here made a comment that really stuck with me: mountain bikers who don't ride road are slow and roadies who don't ride mountain are dicks. Seems to fit my observations.

    AM.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Attacking Mid View Post
    Someone on here made a comment that really stuck with me: mountain bikers who don't ride road are slow and roadies who don't ride mountain are dicks. Seems to fit my observations.
    How do you know that the snotty roadie doesn't ride a mountain bike too?
    I brake for stinkbugs

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Attacking Mid View Post
    Someone on here made a comment that really stuck with me: mountain bikers who don't ride road are slow and roadies who don't ride mountain are dicks. Seems to fit my observations.
    Ha Ha, not always true but true often enough to be funny.

  65. #65
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    I'm slow whether I'm on the road or off of it.
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    The Ikons have a higher block density and lower block size than I was imagining. I'm used to a greater spacing and taller block, like DHEA. I've got some Mezcal's that would probably roll ok on the street, but I wouldn't waste them there.

    Damn. Big Ones are some pretty large tires to run on the street at high speed, at 30psi. My largest hard pack/street tire is the Vittoria Evolution at 1.9". It does fine on the trail at 20-30 psi, but on the street it gets 65psi. I care not for a squirrelly tire when hitting 30+mph on a twisty road. Takes a better skillset than mine.
    I was told they are extremely fast and it was more of a 60 dollar experiment. 40 PSI, the front was just fine. with the lower pressure, the front tire was really under steering and it was unnerving. I am a hill bomber and have some ridiculously wreckless road top 10s on downhill streets despite spinning out with a 32/10. If its steep enough, I just let her rip. Its worth having the knobs up front that I will give up the less than 1 mph average speed I gained.

    My "street" route has about 10 miles of gravel/decomposed granite and singletrack in it anyways. I do have a crazy light 2.0 Black mamba that I may try out as well. I am curious if this thing is actually faster than the big ones.

    It is worth noting that the Big ones are so soft that I think they actually have some resistance form the contact patch and the concrete 10' bike path I ride tempo intervals on in that link above. They seem Faster on oily asphalt. I am still scratching my head at this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    How do you know that the snotty roadie doesn't ride a mountain bike too?
    He would have waved?

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