Paved Bike Trail Signage- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Paved Bike Trail Signage

    All,

    I'm doing some research of how paved bike trails are signed around the country. Could you guys help explain how your local paved trails are signed? We're looking at adding things like mileage or minutes (at a normal 12mph pace or something) and naming the trails. Just looking to see how other places do it. Pics and links would also be helpful

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Someone spraypainted the word "bump" on the pavement once...that was 3 or 4 years ago, and if you squint you can still make out the warning before the minefield of tree root lumps in the asphalt. That is the extent of the signage around here.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  3. #3
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    Nice bike path an hour north in Burlington VT, but I don't see any signage photos on their website http://www.enjoyburlington.com/waterfront.cfm There is an 09 improvements study, don't know what it has for ideas: http://www.enjoyburlington.com/Parks/BikePath1.cfm

    From the FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions
    Q: How long is the Burlington Waterfront Bike Path?
    A: This path is 7 miles long extending from the south end of Oakledge Park at Austin Dr. to its northern terminus at the Winooski River. The path is approximately 8 feet wide. There are mileage markers painted on the path every half mile starting with mile 0 at the south end of the path at Austin Dr.

  4. #4
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    I don't have any photos handy, but I appreciate mileage markers. I was in Monterey, Ca last weekend, and the Recreation trail there has posts every half mile, with mileage measured from the beginning of the path relative to your direction of travel. They also have standard street signs where needed warning of upcoming intersections.

    I seem to recall the American River Bike Trail in Sacramento having painted mileage stripes right on the path, plus periodic "you are here" type maps at major access points along the path.

  5. #5
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    We just have 1/2 mile markers and MUP signs EVERYwhere with the occasional bike sign here or there. No speed limit signs, etc.

  6. #6
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    Okay, so mile markers are good. I'm thinking of having road signs sorta that say how far away certain things are along the trail with arrows at each split in the trail. Then put some half mile markers in. Maybe color code the markers or something. Thanks for the insight.

  7. #7
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I don't have any photos on hand, but I could get some together and upload them soon for you. Here in the Bay Area we have the San Francisco Bay Trail which is an ongoing project to take existing trail sections that run along the San Francisco and San Pablo Bays and connect them with new trail sections to make one gigantic loop. Many of the trail sections are old and signage is great on some, spotty on others. Often times it also depends on which city a particular trail section is running through and how much they want to be involved in the project or even how much capital they have to spend on it. Some places simply have signs designating "San Francisco Bay Trail" and the subsequent city you're riding through. Some parts have mile markers. There are sometimes signs telling you to keep your speed down to 15MPH, pedestrians should keep right and signal when you're passing a pedestrian. Around high traffic areas, near popular parks there are signs telling you to keep it down to 5MPH or call out on blind curves.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Okay, so mile markers are good. I'm thinking of having road signs sorta that say how far away certain things are along the trail with arrows at each split in the trail. Then put some half mile markers in. Maybe color code the markers or something. Thanks for the insight.
    Yes, good idea, don't you hate signs that point to "north beach" or "tinytown" but don't tell you how far they are.

  9. #9
    jrm
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    Wayfinding-Navigation

    including individual segment destination, connections and geographical references. IMO mileage figures are best called out on a map and not a sign.

    the reason being that mileage can only be called out for a single segment whereas on a map the user can connect segments based on mileage and geographical reference

  10. #10
    weirdo
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    Signage to indicate where you have to go just to stay on the main route is a big help, if the main route isn`t obvious. The American River Trail confuses us out-a-towners frequently becuase it has a lot of side trails branching off and it seems that every time we ride it we end up taking an unplanned detour. It`s still a great system, otherwise we wouldn`t bother driving two hours just to play on it and buy a few munchies, but it would be better if it were easier to follow.

    Closer to home, we have a long bike route that incorporates a few stretches of special use pathways split between on street routing. Same problem, when it comes to the street routing- miss one little (tiny!) sign and you`ve lost the route unless you already know where you`re going. And for those who DO know the route, the signs probably don`t matter.

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