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    My favorite part of this ^^ article was this obvious yet insightful section:

    Some motorists also complain that the rule means they have to pass the same cyclist on multiple occasions.

    Maybe, but the question is, once they've passed the cyclist, why don't they zoom off, never to be seen again? More than likely, the motorist is repeatedly being held up by traffic lights or the car in front of them. They are still in the same place in the traffic, it just takes a bit longer to move around the bicycle to get there, and frustrations about traffic congestion in general are pinned on the cyclist not the other cars.

  3. #3
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    This part is very true:

    It's not a well-known rule among motorists, which can lead to misunderstanding and even anger about perceived lawlessness.

    I encounter this situation regularly. Just the other day I had a lady try to block me when I was passing a line of traffic on the right at a stop light. She blatantly moved to the right when I was about to pass, I ended up riding on the grass for a minute, good thing there was no curb. I turned around and gave her a angry stare and subsequently got beeped at.

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    Interesting article. I generally avoid passing on the right and "filtering" at stop lights. I choose to line up with the cars. The line-ups I get into are not that long, so riding on the right is a risk I am not willing to take, but I can understand why some choose to do it. If you are going to do it, you just have to be super-aware and when near a driveway, cross-street etc. be prepared to give way.

  5. #5
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    I'm with Woodway, I just line up and wait like I am a car. I think if I was in a more congested place, maybe I wouldn't, but where I ride, I am only ever like 5 cars back from a light. Maybe in some sort of California congestion I would ride differently, but it works for me where I am.
    I am a man of many words. KCCO!

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    where I live now, traffic isn't that bad for the most part. There's one intersection where it can back up for a couple light cycles, though. I still fall in line with traffic. I prefer being out in the lane and more visible rather than hugging the curb and being overlooked.

    If I was in heavy traffic that wasn't moving, I might make a different decision on the matter. But in the past, I've had issues with right hooks from drivers who weren't signaling their intention to turn right, so I didn't realize I should not be right alongside those people at the light. Never been hit, but some close calls from filtering in those cases.

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    I pass on the right mostly.....

    I have certainly passed on the left.....mostly it is more dangerous because the driver is definately not expecting it.

    I have also passed between two lanes...

    Around here the traffic can back up several blocks, I am not going to sit for 45 minutes to clear the jam, when I can safely ride around it.

    I have ridden sidewalks when the jams become "exicited" people starting to get a little owly honking, jostling. Slower down around 10 km/h but often much safer.

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    I think that passing on the left in the article referred to Australian roads where they drive on the left, so passing on the left there is like passing on the right in NA. Here is passing on the left in NA sided driving:

    Riding in the car lanes just to see how I like it! - YouTube

    Video link is in article. I must be a wuss, That looks a bit too harry for me. Of course I am slower, now. Also is he leading the light change a bit too much given how late people push the yellow?

    I get in line here, but with lines like that, I'd be trying to get by, too.

    BrianMc

    BrianMc

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    I think that passing on the left in the article referred to Australian roads where they drive on the left, so passing on the left there is like passing on the right in NA. Here is passing on the left in NA sided driving:

    Riding in the car lanes just to see how I like it! - YouTube

    Video link is in article. I must be a wuss, That looks a bit too harry for me. Of course I am slower, now. Also is he leading the light change a bit too much given how late people push the yellow?

    I get in line here, but with lines like that, I'd be trying to get by, too.

    BrianMc

    BrianMc
    Down in the comments someone asked the same question regarding jumping the lights and he responds that the traffic was just so backed up, folks weren't going even when the light was green. If so, they must actually enforce blocking intersections over there because in the states in many cities, I see cars pull into and block the intersection in heavy traffic like that when the cars at the other end have not begun moving yet.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    Video link is in article. I must be a wuss, That looks a bit too harry for me. Of course I am slower, now.
    It really freaked me out when I thought he was riding in the fast lane . The first part shows a bit of frontage road on the left that appears to be plain old non-Brit "other way" left!

    I really don`t have need to filter because I very seldom find myself riding in the midst of that much backed up traffic. I`d probably try it, depending on how safe it felt, if it looked like it was going to save me any time. I can say that I do get pissed off when I see the motorcycles doing that (it`s legal to split lanes on a motorcycle in CA), so I can see why it would piss off mortrists to see pedaled bikes doing it.
    Recalculating....

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    It really freaked me out when I thought he was riding in the fast lane . The first part shows a bit of frontage road on the left that appears to be plain old non-Brit "other way" left!
    Yes, you can see the traffic light standards. Also says a lot about world cars. Not too long ago the vehicles would clearly say Great Britain. I assume that the feeder lanes to the right of the curb on the right, are reserved for buses or multiple passenger carrying vehicles?

    He sure squeezed through tight spots. I'd be concerned about road rage door openers.

    Here they mostly avoid blocking the intersection. Those that do are 50% 'got surprised' and 50% 'don't care'. Makes sense now. Sometimes what is not in the camera's view is more important than what is.

    I was surprised the backwards video did not make me feel queasy. The one I made did. Maybe video smoothing helps.

    BrianMc

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    Quote Originally Posted by Straz85 View Post
    This part is very true:

    It's not a well-known rule among motorists, which can lead to misunderstanding and even anger about perceived lawlessness.

    I encounter this situation regularly. Just the other day I had a lady try to block me when I was passing a line of traffic on the right at a stop light. She blatantly moved to the right when I was about to pass, I ended up riding on the grass for a minute, good thing there was no curb. I turned around and gave her a angry stare and subsequently got beeped at.
    Even worse, when people know the law, they interpret that as not allowing cyclists to overtake on the right.

    Take this for example:
    SMC 11.44.080 clearly states that a bicycle can overtake on the right as long as it is safe. However, this merely covers a further reaching rule - RCW 46.61.115 (2), which covers all areas of Washington that do not have an overriding law. Talking to the motorcyclists and drivers at work - and keeping in mind that I work with guys that have an average IQ of above 100, frequently well in excess of 100 - on average, very few know that this law allows cyclists to overtake on the right side. Even worse, they didn't know that RCW 46.61.110 (2) means that when a driver is turning across a bicycle lane, the driver is the one that has to give way.

    Combine these two things - cyclists can legally overtake on the right, and drivers have to yield to cyclists when turning across them - and that drivers don't know that these are the case and you have a recipe for disaster. This may seem to be empirical evidence, and I would agree with that statement if not for a recent group of motorcyclists asking about these exact laws and scenarios.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    Interesting article. I generally avoid passing on the right and "filtering" at stop lights. I choose to line up with the cars. The line-ups I get into are not that long, so riding on the right is a risk I am not willing to take, but I can understand why some choose to do it. If you are going to do it, you just have to be super-aware and when near a driveway, cross-street etc. be prepared to give way.
    For me, it really depends on what's on the near and far side of the light. If the road has a wide outside lane, and the lane that goes straight is wide too, yeah, I'll filter up. If the opposite side is narrow and the straight lane is narrow with a right turn lane next to it, I'll line up.

    Certain intersections I always filter up to the front because I know the line of cars will have me waiting 3 cycles before I get to cross.

  14. #14
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    I very rarely pass on the right. I try not to pass unless I have an expected destination that I consider fairly safe too. Often, filtering without a bike lane means that I have to assume that there's somewhere to go, and that I won't get boxed out or doored at some point. It's also pretty rare that traffic is backed up enough on the street that I can't make the next light cycle, so usually I don't think it earns me anything to make those sketchy passes.

    Sometimes I take lanes even in the presence of a bike lane. Especially the old-fashioned ones that are just two paint lines that land me squarely in the door zone with nowhere to go. Usually if I'm carrying a lot of speed.

    That said, I have been known to succumb to temptation when traffic really does lock up.

    I think "ride like everyone's trying to kill you" is way too extreme and I don't care to live my life that scared. But I also try to avoid making decisions that rely on someone else noticing that I'm someplace weird, where I couldn't drive my Pathfinder, in order to be safe.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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