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Thread: Passing!

  1. #1
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Passing!

    Most of my commute is along a path that is heavily used by people walking, jogging and cycling. I respect everyone's right to use the path, but I have to pass a number of them each day, and I have always yelled "passing" as I approach. I have found that it only works maybe 50% of the time. For a while, I tried "on your left" but then people would just step to their left, so I dropped it. So, last year I finally bought a nice loud, dorky bell, but to my dismay most people completely ignore it, much more than my yelling. So, it ends up being a combination of yelling, dinging my bell, and slowing to a near stop to wait for people to figure out what they're doing. I'm wondering what other people do and if it works. Do other people experience the same problem? I know it is and will continue to be part of commuting, but if other people have better ideas then I would like to know so that I can possibly avoid any future accidents. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I just yell on your left and go around them. Sometimes they step to the left so I pass on the right. Just yell it far enough away and loud enough that you don't have to slow too much.

  3. #3
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    A bell is great for this if you do not want to keep yelling.

    pink

  4. #4
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57
    A bell is great for this if you do not want to keep yelling.

    pink
    thanks. i can tell that you read at least part of my post . . .

  5. #5
    weirdo
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    Even adults ignore your bell? We have very little designated bike path around here, so my experience there is really limited, but the bell seems to work great with adults as long as they aren`t wearing walkmans. For some reason, kids don`t seem to register the sound and it makes me wonder if it`s because some of them grew up after actual bell sounds had been displaced by buzzes and beeps. I hope someone else has some ideas for you- that`s all I know about bike paths.
    Recalculating....

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    thanks. i can tell that you read at least part of my post . . .
    I am busted....

    Shift gears (noise)
    Ring bell
    Yell
    Air horn (could be funny, but effective)
    Just pass by

    If someone isnt listening they're not listening and that's how it goes, we can't change what people listen to unfortunately.

    pink

  7. #7
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Ya, I have to figure that some are listening to ipods or something, but I yell pretty loud. The worst is when I do everything I can to get their attention, and then when I pass they act all startled and upset. Or how about getting clotheslined by people who let their leashed dogs walk on the opposite side of the path so that there's no way to pass besides riding off the road. I tell ya. . .

  8. #8
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    Having been a parent pushing a stroller; walking, skating, cycling with my then young children; and walking my various dogs on multiuse paths; I've personally decided to accept that MUPs are going to be slow. I learned my lesson many years back when I rode too fast and nearly ran into a toddler. I fully understood the glare of parents staring me down as I rode away. I now make an effort to audibly announce my intention to pass by either calling out or ringing a bell, but some people just do not notice until I'm right behind them. When I pass, I go by slowly and with enough clearance to hopefully avoid any mishaps.
    I'm gravity challenged, adrenaline deficient, and looking for that endorphine high. Shout out, I'll move out of the way. :-)

  9. #9
    enjoys skidding
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    I always make a lot of noise before I get close anyway. Freewheel on my SS is nice and loud, cough or something like that.. then when I'm closer if they haven't noticed me I'll yell "excuse me" or something like that.

  10. #10
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    I just yell out or say "Excuse Me". Always work for me..
    Check this out
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_MphtzCOEc

    Since Japan are full of bikes and people grow up with... they're all so use to the sound of the "Bell". Awsome stuff
    Giant Yukon 09'
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  11. #11
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    I just pass and scare the piss out of them. Better than them jumping in front of me. "On your left" just doesn't work and I'm going too fast to really yell at them anyways. I can't yell loud enough for them to have enough time to react to it. People are just inconsiderate ****s. The worst are the rollerbladers. They take up the whole trail and have their ****ing headphones in and can't hurt you anyways. So you sit and yell at them and they don't even notice.

  12. #12
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    Use profanity. Especially when children are around.

  13. #13
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    Bells don't work. People don't hear them or they can't figure out where the sound is coming from. I've seen people looking everywhere but behind them when I ring my bell. I say "heads up!" or "on your left" or whatever. Remember to say Thanks after you pass them so they don't think you're a prick and complain about people riding too fast.

  14. #14
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    Geez

    I have used a bell, yelled, swore, stopped, ridden off the path, said excuse me, said on your left, track stood and said any which way you want....

    But I have never hit someone...

    Well except a roadie who did not like me drafting him so he locked up both wheels, oops.

  15. #15
    Frt Range, CO
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    I ring my bell, if they don't respond I pass them at walking speed. MUPs are good interval training

  16. #16
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Well it sounds like I'm not alone here. I should clarify that I always slow down and thank folks when I pass. I like to take walks with my kids on the same path, so I was more interested in ways to make passing safer. A collision at 5 mph can still cause serious injuries, especially to kids and animals.

  17. #17
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    Stay on the right because you never know when someone faster will want to pass you and walk, bike, jog, rollerblade in a predictable line. Don't assume that there's no one around. A fast cyclist can sneak up on you when you least expect it.

  18. #18
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I am getting 'path rage' just reading this thread. I couldn't handle this situation. I would shove some kid into thier idiot parent and jam sticks into the spokes of any moron on the wrong side of the path. ...in my mind. Then I would just keep saying "on your left" or something.

    But this is another great reason to move out of the city, in my opinion.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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    (no excuse for that either)

  19. #19
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    I am getting 'path rage' just reading this thread. I couldn't handle this situation. I would shove some kid into thier idiot parent and jam sticks into the spokes of any moron on the wrong side of the path. ...in my mind. Then I would just keep saying "on your left" or something.

    But this is another great reason to move out of the city, in my opinion.
    You and I are alike. I'm a fairly aggressive commuter, so when cars get in my way, I'll try and close their sideview mirror as they try and sideswipe me. If someone steps into my path (in bicycle lanes) without looking, I buzz them. I buzz people walking in the middle of the path. Since I don't like slowing down, I typically yell "On your left!" from about 50 yards out and usually the really stupid ones can figure it out quickly enough that I don't have to come to a complete stop.

    Luckily, I live in Oregon, so I only really deal with the madness when the weather is nice- when it is rainy I get the paths and bike lanes to myself.

  20. #20
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I use the triumvirate of bells, yelling and slowing to a near stop to wait for people to figure out what they're doing. The sad fact is that people on MUPs act the same way that they do while driving; they're either too selfish to give a sh!t about other users or they're just too self-absorbed to even notice that you're there. Then you have @sshole roadies on their "training" rides, passing you on the right and threading their way through as you're trying to pass on the left. Don't get me wrong, I love MUPs but they're a microcosm on the street and should be ridden in similar ways. Be defensive and watch out for others, because they're not even watching out for themselves. You have to try your hardest not to hit someone, because it will always be your fault since no one ever wants to take responsibility for their own actions.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  21. #21
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    the bike bell vid that was posted was cool! those japanese people are really trained!! I need a bell not that I ride on the sidewalk or anything but I usually encounter the occasional pedestrian when I'm going up hill and out of breath to say "on your left"!
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say.” – Joshua Stinebrink

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  22. #22
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    I'm wondering what other people do and if it works.
    Your post highlights one of the prime reasons I don't like MUPs. I know it's not the answer you want to hear, but I simply jump on the arterial streets and go where I'm going. I know that not everyone has good alternatives, but we certainly do here.

  23. #23
    jrm
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    From your description

    your unsuccessful use of one method tells me how MUTs give users a false sense of security. People assume everyone else is looking out for their dog, kid, grandma and spouse. But in the mean time these same people arent looking out for anyone else.

    Its like the guy who expects others to let him into a lane but when its time for him to let others into a lane he closes um out. its a total me-me

    I see it this way keep on going about your ways of getting peoples attention and just deal. Or scope out another route thats a class II route with markings and bike traffic so that drivers are used to sharing the road with cyclists.

  24. #24
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    Try yelling "CAR"!!!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Even adults ignore your bell? We have very little designated bike path around here, so my experience there is really limited, but the bell seems to work great with adults as long as they aren`t wearing walkmans. For some reason, kids don`t seem to register the sound and it makes me wonder if it`s because some of them grew up after actual bell sounds had been displaced by buzzes and beeps. I hope someone else has some ideas for you- that`s all I know about bike paths.
    Depending on park/path the mentality is whoever is in front is entitled to not have to move.

    My worst wreck was when a pedestrian purposely ran out in front of me on the fly in a bike lane then stopped in defiance. I can't remember the details (it's been 20 years almost) but the UF police cited the pedestrian for something. I veered off into the brush (versus traffic) and was pretty messed up for a couple weeks.

    The pedestrian insisted she had the right of way and I should have stopped (there was no way I'd have stopped in time). While I will admit that is true, it's a different matter when you are just jumping in front of vehicles.

  26. #26
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    I've tried having an airhorn taped to the bars, it worked great, the policeman didn't agree with me.

    Tbh I've always just quietly waited for a safe opportunity, then pass. It leads to going slow in busy areas, which is a pain, but it works. The people that ignore bells/being asked are usually the people who cry loudest about not using them when you brush past them. Maybe get a Pro 2 hub, they'll never not hear you coming.

  27. #27
    I think I need to Upgrade
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    Put a baseball card in your spokes that way you kinda sound like a motorcycle!

  28. #28
    The Brutally Handsome
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    i had a new one this morning: riding up on two people walking their dogs, one on each side of the path, i dinged my bell and they just switched places!

  29. #29
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzSpeedfreek
    Try yelling "CAR"!!!
    Ha! That one just might be the ticket!

    We took a road trip today for a tandem ride on Sacramento`s awesome riverside bike path for a few hours. Saw lots of bikes of all sorts and got very lucky with the MUT traffic. Didn`t get stuck behind a single other user and the only part that vaguely belongs in this thread is when my wife jumpped half out of her skin at the call of "On your left!" from right behind her. Pretty funny for me because I knew he was comming up- the old lady had been in lala land.

    Oh yeah- she wins a big prize for learning how to stand and pedal at the same time. Before, whenever she stood up for a bump, the pedals came to a sudden halt (amazing how strong her legs get when it`s to STOP the pedals). Today we finally got that one licked. Yay, Lupita!
    Recalculating....

  30. #30
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    dang, now I feel passive; I usually slow and follow until they clear out of the way. >_<

  31. #31
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    I'm still angry. I would be so flipping mad having to slow down all the time for these idiots. I would go into stealth mode and not yell "ON YOUR LEFT" until my mouth was maybe 4 inches from their ear. Do that every day, to every person until all of the people who use that bike path at that time of day hate it so bad they change their schedule.

    ...again, in my head. I'm an internet tough guy. Ignore me. Carry on.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  32. #32
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    You should take off your bike pump and give them a good crack in the back of their heads while you're at it. :P

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by limba
    You should take off your bike pump and give them a good crack in the back of their heads while you're at it. :P
    great idea, brb!

  34. #34
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    my personal experience on using trails with everyone from kids, joggers and cyclists is to yell far enough in advance "on your left" to let them know I am passing and for the most part it works well. I yell loud and clear so there is no mistaking what my intensions are. But on occasion, I run into the idiot who feels they have all the right in the world to walk down the middle of trail and refuses to move to the right so that I may safely pass. In these circumstances I yell "passing on your left" again and louder with an aggressive military Sergeants voice and that seems to get them moving. But if it doesn't... then I buzz them.
    As for the dyslexic folk on the trail who move to the left when I yell "passing on your left", I give them a break and yell "your other left", then they turn and see me coming up behind them and they quickly move over to the right.

    I have to say that for the most part, people who use multi-use sidewalk trails in my town are pretty good about moving out of the way of an approaching cyclist providing they are given a heads-up as the cyclist is approaching and planning to pass. And more often than not, those I pass tend to give me a wave and say thanks for giving them a vocal notice of my intentions.
    I think a lot of the issues with cyclist passing is often the people walking on the trails are new to it and don't get the etiquette of sharing the trails. While others who are accustom to the trails refuse to move b/c they hate anyone on two-wheels due to the fact that so many people who ride the trails are unaware of the respect that needs to be shown to the walkers/joggers by letting them know you are approaching.

  35. #35
    sofa king awsm
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    I sing at the top of my lungs.

    "Sweet Caroline...bah duh duh...good times never seemed so good."

    Not only do they move, they stare.
    Baby, I want my face to be your quiver killer.

  36. #36
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    OK, now we've all been over what it's like pulling up behind someone on a trail, so what about people coming in the opposite direction? Ever have to weave your way through people who are perpetually walking on the left side? Ever have to play chicken with another cyclist who is staring straight ahead but doesn't seem to see you approaching rapidly (or simply refuses to move over to their own side of the trail?)

    How about big knots of people simply standing in the middle of the trail, apparently having some sort of social gathering? On a section of the San Francisco Bay Trail, there's a point where all the kite surfers launch from. Every time I pass through, there's some guy with his gear spread out all over the trail or somebody walking along from the parking lot to the shore with their huge, inflated rig spanning across the trail on both sides impeding movement in both directions.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  37. #37
    My Brain Hurts!
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    6 paintball shots to the glutes will get them moving....

    Seriously, I really don't take too much offense if they ignore me. It is frustrating but nothing to lose sleep over.Most times I will pass real wide on the grass if the won't or don't move. And in this day and age of Ipods, most walkers just don't hear you.
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  38. #38
    The Brutally Handsome
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    I think this conversation has gone off the path a bit . . . I'm not looking for ideas how to bludgeon people as I pass them. I wanted some ideas how to keep everyone safe. I'll admit that I too get passed on my commute, and I like it when people make their presence known. Perhaps we could tell what works best for us when we are being passed, I prefer it when people say "on your left" to me. Anyone else???

  39. #39
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    Now I've seen it all

    On my way home today two cyclist coming the other way took the whole path and one riding well on the left would have run right into me. I brushed him on my left side before heading off the path into the bushes. Unfortunately its a steep drop off with brush, so my road bike wasn't quite able to handle the terrain and I crashed anyway.

    It was an older guy and he was very apologetic. I almost felt bad hitting him with pepper spray Usually I have a problem with kids on brand new fixies that are all over the place.

    I'm ready to go all road. I always knew that I'd eventually get in a wreck on the path.

  40. #40
    Hairy man
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    OK, now we've all been over what it's like pulling up behind someone on a trail, so what about people coming in the opposite direction? Ever have to weave your way through people who are perpetually walking on the left side? Ever have to play chicken with another cyclist who is staring straight ahead but doesn't seem to see you approaching rapidly (or simply refuses to move over to their own side of the trail?)

    How about big knots of people simply standing in the middle of the trail, apparently having some sort of social gathering? On a section of the San Francisco Bay Trail, there's a point where all the kite surfers launch from. Every time I pass through, there's some guy with his gear spread out all over the trail or somebody walking along from the parking lot to the shore with their huge, inflated rig spanning across the trail on both sides impeding movement in both directions.
    There's just nothing you can do about people who have made the decision to be an *******.
    We all get it in the end.

  41. #41
    Hairy man
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    I think this conversation has gone off the path a bit . . . I'm not looking for ideas how to bludgeon people as I pass them. I wanted some ideas how to keep everyone safe. I'll admit that I too get passed on my commute, and I like it when people make their presence known. Perhaps we could tell what works best for us when we are being passed, I prefer it when people say "on your left" to me. Anyone else???
    "On you left" or a a bell works well for me. I use "On your left" when I'm passing people on the Burke-Gilman trail here in the Seattle, and better than half of them seem to get it. The people who stop for a conversation in the middle of the trail drive me nuts, but I only see them on weekends and I rarely ride the BG on weekends.

    My biggest issue is at the intersections with streets on this bike path. There is a crosswalk, and in Seattle pedestrians always have the right of way at a crosswalk and bikes count as pedestrians if they're on the sidewalk. BUT there's also a stop sign on the trail at road intersections, which would seem to indicate that bikes should stop. What this means is that bikes and cars stop, then have a Canadian Stand Off about who goes first. It's completely annoying.
    We all get it in the end.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    I think this conversation has gone off the path a bit . . . I'm not looking for ideas how to bludgeon people as I pass them. I wanted some ideas how to keep everyone safe.
    One way to keep everyone safe is to not use the MUP when you want to ride at normal cruising speed (or faster). In my area, anywhere the MUP can take you, the city arterials can take you faster and safer. There are no rollerblading iPod zombies with dogs on 20-foot leashes on a 4-lane arterial Everyone knows the rules of the game on an arterial.

  43. #43
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Here are my two options. Which would you choose?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Passing!-path-1.jpg  

    Passing!-path-2.jpg  


  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    Here are my two options. Which would you choose?
    The highway, definitely. That shoulder's huge, and notably devoid of iPod zombies

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    Here are my two options. Which would you choose?
    If it always rains on the road and is nice on the path, I would probably take the path.

  46. #46
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    seriously? you would survive perhaps only several days before being sideswiped. but to each his own!

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    seriously? you would survive perhaps only several days before being sideswiped. but to each his own!
    Weird, and after all these years I'm still alive anyway I ride highways similar to that picture, with snow & ice added: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfG1kjwVgi4 The highway part of the trip is in the second half, and makes your highway photo look rather tame

    Seriously, do you think a narrow little 2-way MUP full of people doing random stuff is safer than a state highway with a vast line of sight, a huge shoulder, one-way traffic, and users who all know the rules? About all I need to worry about on the highway is making sure I'm visible from a sufficient distance that people can plan ahead.

  48. #48
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    Anyway, to answer the question, you want some way of alerting people who can't see you, and may not be able to hear you either, as you overtake them from behind. Short of a rudely-loud air horn or its equivalent... how about a laser pointer that you shine on the ground in front of them, off to one side, if people are unresponsive to a bell or voice? That would be unusual enough to make people turn and look.

  49. #49
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    Here are my two options. Which would you choose?
    I`ll take my own over both of your options .

    I do occasoinally ride the shoulder of a simliar looking highway, although not on my commute, and so far it`s always been in decent weather. The nice wide shoulder makes it fairly safe even though the constant stream of traffic takes the pleasantness out of the trip.

    And even though it doesn`t look very useful for comuting, I sure wish we had an MUT like that for dinking around on.
    Recalculating....

  50. #50
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I would take the MUP if it's early in the day, during the week. Highway if the shoulder is that wide most of the way, it's a weekend and I'm in a hurry or want to scorch.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  51. #51
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfG1kjwVgi4

    Seriously, do you think a narrow little 2-way MUP full of people doing random stuff is safer than a state highway with a vast line of sight, a huge shoulder, one-way traffic, and users who all know the rules? About all I need to worry about on the highway is making sure I'm visible from a sufficient distance that people can plan ahead.
    Wow, you really get moving over that cat crap! I especially like the parts where you turned your head around like an owl to watch behind you!

    Very good point about everybody knowing the rules. I doubt that`s really the case on the road anywhere, but much moreso than on free-for-all MUTs, in my limited MUT experience. One good thing about riding the shoulders of a major highway is that everybody is more predictable. Mostly staight lines with comparitively little in and out, on and off, probably a bigger percentage paying attention.
    Recalculating....

  52. #52
    The Brutally Handsome
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    cool video, sometimes wish it snowed like that here. do you live in the PNW?

    not sure anyone would consider riding down I-5 tame. in fact, I can't say that I have seen anyone ever ride it because of the dangers involved. you would certainly be killed, just a matter of when.

  53. #53
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Wow, you really get moving over that cat crap! I especially like the parts where you turned your head around like an owl to watch behind you!
    Actually, I was riding one-handed and holding a regular ol' Canon digital camera in the other hand, is how I do the over-the-shoulder video. NOW you can call me crazy if you want to

  54. #54
    Ride = Life
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    Most of my commute is along a path that is heavily used by people walking, jogging and cycling. I respect everyone's right to use the path, but I have to pass a number of them each day, and I have always yelled "passing" as I approach. I have found that it only works maybe 50% of the time. For a while, I tried "on your left" but then people would just step to their left, so I dropped it. So, last year I finally bought a nice loud, dorky bell, but to my dismay most people completely ignore it, much more than my yelling. So, it ends up being a combination of yelling, dinging my bell, and slowing to a near stop to wait for people to figure out what they're doing. I'm wondering what other people do and if it works. Do other people experience the same problem? I know it is and will continue to be part of commuting, but if other people have better ideas then I would like to know so that I can possibly avoid any future accidents. Thanks!
    I too ditched the incredibell. It does nothing if the walker/jogger/cyclist isn't paying attention, talking, or listening to MP3 player.

    I simply yell, "ON YOUR LEFT!" and pass.

    For cars and large groups of people (i.e. in cities) a whistle does a great job of getting people's attention. Takes up little space, can be worn around neck, and is very light weight. Better then handlebar mounted airhorns.
    "Riding is about rhythm and flow. It's the wind in your face and the challenge of hammering up a long hill…" - Gary Klein

  55. #55
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    i found the same around here most people ignored the bell i just yell on your left far enough away to tell what they will do ....but i have noticed that doesn't always work either
    ______
    "thirty spokes converge upon a wheel but it is the hole in the center that enables it to be used"

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by laotsu42
    i found the same around here most people ignored the bell i just yell on your left far enough away to tell what they will do ....but i have noticed that doesn't always work either
    Reading above it's sort of comforting to know I just wasn't singled out.

    I have tried the upshift / downshift trick. It's a fairly good audible IMHO without being obnoxious.

    People today I really think believe everyone else doesn't matter. It's sad.

    The more sad part is how some of our biking brothers are deciding to form their own gangs and go after the drivers. It's really not helping the cause.

    My wife is 100% against me bike commuting 3.5 miles to work because on her 15 mile car commute through town she sees cars and esp. SUV/4x4 types getting really close to both bikers and pedestrians which aren't even blocking a lane (bike paths and swales).

    Just cutting my lawn though tells me a lot about those trying to 'brush' someone next to the road to be a thug/gangsta or whatever role they are trying for in society.

  57. #57
    Bedwards Of The West
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    A relevant read from 'the explainer' on velonews: http://www.velonews.com/article/9898...h-is-it-anyway
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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