Parts or a new Bike to commute- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Parts or a new Bike to commute

    I just started commuting to work and about anywhere else I wanna go.
    My current Bike is a Raleigh Talus 5.0 Link To My Bike, I have the White /Silver & Blue
    I'm trying to decide wether to pickup an entry level roadie or just apply the cash towards parts and pieces to make my MTB the do-all. Currently 99.9% of my riding is road/street/sidewalk. Roads are ****, sidewalk when there are no bike lanes or traffic is to aggressive.
    This is the roadie I was thinking of getting from my LBS
    Raleigh Revenio 1.0 for $650
    Or just put the cash into the Talus in way of Tires and a fork.
    Any good ideas for tires and forks?

  2. #2
    Swedetarded
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    The Leatherman concept. A single multi-tool will never replace the specific tools it is trying to mimic.

    It seems that you are a Raleigh guy, so, I would look toward the Sojurn for a commuter. Why? It's made of the things that make a good commuter.

    Disc brakes for when the weather sucks
    Not as flashy as the road bike
    Made to be comfortable
    Larger Tires
    Fenders
    Rack

    Add pannier bags and you are good to go.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the input.. But the model you mention just doesn't grab me.
    I do know what you mean by multi-tool concept. But I think I'm leaning more towards parts at this point. I love to tinker with stuff. And it may personalize it a bit for me.
    For the going price of the model you mentioned and the roadie I was thinking of, I could go a long way towards some road friendly parts.

    Anyone for some parts suggestions?

  4. #4
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    How long a commute or are your rides typically? Can you lock out the fork?

    You could try throwing a set of street tires on your mountain bike first and see how that goes. That's what a lot of people around here, San Francisco, do. If the fork can be locked out, I don't know that I'd bother replacing it. For years, I rode a front shock mountain bike with street tires, 75mm non-lockable suspension fork and all.

    I now ride a hybrid on 29x 1.6" tires (622x42) which is pretty big as far as hybrids go, but works fairly well in urban environment with some packed dirt trails. I'm sure it slows me down some though.

  5. #5
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    Can't lock the fork, I can adjust the preload it has 100mm of travel. I can get a rigid fork from $65- on up. But the LSB suggests doing as you say also. Try some street tires and go from there. My work Commute is only 11 miles round trip, but I usually ride later in the evenings on the week days putting in another 10-14 for fitness. And roughly 20-40 on the weekends extending my distance each outing by just a little.

  6. #6
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    Your call on that one. An MTB can be made into a very effective commuter. Tires and a ridged fork are a good start. But if the suspension fork is of reasonable quality and works, it usually doesn't hurt anything. In the instance of really crappy roads it can actually be a plus. Add to that a rear rack and you can do just about anything around town with it. An MTB isn't as fast as a road bike or a hybrid, but if speed isn't essential it'll be fine. I've been commuting on a converted MTB for years and it works for me. I've tried road bikes and hybrid commuters, but they don't cut the **** paved roads, and wash boarded dirt roads on my route. If it matters, you can also consider the budget angle as well. I'd bet a soggy doughnut that a fork, tires and a rack would be quite a bit cheaper than the new road bike as well.

    As I said, your call. Depending on road conditions on your route and your specific needs, a converted MTB can certainly be the right tool.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  7. #7
    Wanderer
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    I just use my current mountain bike and got one of the BOB Trailers to tow to work on monday with 5 days worth of cloths in it and tow it back home on friday.

    I would much rather do my commute on a mountain bike than a road bike but your route may be better than mine.

  8. #8
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    Interesting and good input. I'm in central florida on the east coast. Not all the road is ideal with pot holes and varying pavement quality. About 3 of the 5 miles are decent on my morning commute.
    I think I'll go with the tires and rack today and see how it pans out.
    Probably try looking for a non-knobby tire but not to much smaller than the 2.2 thats on it now. I like the added tire cushion. I read somewhere someone had a big tire that had less rolling resistance than a skinny. Can't remember the name or brand. Anyone got any recommendations for a good rolling non-skinny?

  9. #9
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    The tire I wish I could fit (but can't without a new bike):

    Schwalbe's Big Apples.

    From Rivenedell's write up:

    "The biggest, roundest tire made, and the top choice when comfort & traction are at the tip-top of your list.....AND your frame has the oodles of clearance required to fit them.

    We sell them most often to Atlantis owners, but any "29er" mountain bike will accept them, too. But if you've a 29er you already have suspension (more'n likely), in which case you won't need the extra you'll get by running these at 20psi.

    Anyway, Big Apples are the big fat Buddhas of bicycle tires, and there's just nothing like them.

    Your choice of either 700c x 50 or 26" x 2.15".

    Wire bead, KevlarGuard puncture protection."

    CB has the fatter 29er version that what Rivendell sells, maybe he'll chime in.

  10. #10
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    I love the Big Apples. I have the 26x2.35 size. Big, fat (dare I say voluptuous?), and comfortable. Still pretty quick too!

    I swapped from some 26x1.75 Forte tires that are marketed as urban/commuter tires, and while they did well, I wanted more cushion.



    Reflective sidewalls add to the commuter safety factor too.

    (Disclaimer: Please note that I have a fat tire addiction and this may be a factor in my recommendation)
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountfargo.com

  11. #11
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    (Disclaimer: Please note that I have a fat tire addiction and this may be a factor in my recommendation)

    LOL... love it..!!
    Fat tire... can't agree any more so.. From my Jeep to our Roush Mustang.. As much meat on the asphalt as I can. Probably be good for my back also. (Broke it on a AMA race course in 2006. Crushed 4 vertebras and fractured my neck. Got pushed out of turn one, Now I got enough titanium in my upper back to built a small kids BMX frame..LOL) Now we have ditched the Roadie in light of comfort and versatility.

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