Parking in High Crime Area- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Killer of Chains
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    Parking in High Crime Area

    I just got a job at the local county library as a driver. This will allow me to get a little sweaty before coming to work, and since its only about 2 miles away, its the perfect distance for a early morning wake up ride.

    However, the library, despite lots of activity and security cameras has been plagued by bike theft.

    My commuter isn't expensive, and its got ugly multi-colored 90's neon paint, but its still my bike, and I don't want it stolen.

    Should I forgo the risks and drive/motorcycle, or should I buy a bigger lock?

  2. #2
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    As long as your lock is harder to break than the one on the bike next to yours, you will be fine. A good U lock should do it, and you can get a cable for the front wheel if wheel theft is a problem.
    Matt

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    Two U locks (one for each wheel through the frame) would be even more of a deterrent

  4. #4
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    Just walk. I mean, seriously, it's two miles. That used to be my daily walk commute.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  5. #5
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    So your bike will be there on a predictable timetable and there's a theft problem. Based on that, I'd:

    1. get a really good main lock, such as the Kryptonite New York U-lock, and lock the rear wheel and frame to something super-strong and well-anchored.

    2. Secure the front wheel to the U-lock with a cable at least, and you can put the cable through your seat rails too if you use the cable like a lasoo.

    3. Bonus points for using two complete locks, at least one of which is top-notch. And if you can secure the bike to two separate strong objects, such as two sections of a beefy railing, that's even better.

    Some more info here: mechBgon's bicycle-locking ideas

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    So your bike will be there on a predictable timetable and there's a theft problem. Based on that, I'd:

    1. get a really good main lock, such as the Kryptonite New York U-lock, and lock the rear wheel and frame to something super-strong and well-anchored.

    2. Secure the front wheel to the U-lock with a cable at least, and you can put the cable through your seat rails too if you use the cable like a lasoo.

    3. Bonus points for using two complete locks, at least one of which is top-notch. And if you can secure the bike to two separate strong objects, such as two sections of a beefy railing, that's even better.

    Some more info here: mechBgon's bicycle-locking ideas
    Is theft of bikes secured with weaker U-locks really a problem? What kind of attack does it take to break one (jack or angle grinder, I guess), and are any thieves really using those tools? What does a good u-lock do for you that a cheap one doesn't, besides buy a few more seconds as someone tries to break it?

    I have an Onguard Bulldog, and I've never worried about it even a little, and I've never heard of bikes with U-locks getting stolen except in theory.
    Matt

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by m85476585 View Post
    Is theft of bikes secured with weaker U-locks really a problem? What kind of attack does it take to break one (jack or angle grinder, I guess), and are any thieves really using those tools?
    ....
    A ball point pen.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    A ball point pen.
    ...With acid instead of ink?
    "Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride." - John F. Kennedy

    Setup:
    11' Giant XTC 2 29er

  9. #9
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    What you want to do

    lock the bike, with whatever lock you have, so that access to the lock is tough or better yet impossible with a compact floor jack, bolt cutters or a hack saw. The tighter the ulock and/or cable around the tubes and wheels of the bike make it more difficult for thieves to get to the locks. Also locking your bike in a high traveled open areas are best.

    But i have to ask, have you asked or scoped out whether or not you can park your bike inside the library somewhere safer? See if there is any kind of bicycle station, parking garage or a near by transit station that may offer higher security parking.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by nikojan View Post
    ...With acid instead of ink?
    I think he's referring to some U-locks which could be picked with a simple pen, though Kryponite locks were venerable to this as well at one point in time. Check out videos on YouTube.

  11. #11
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    It is great link
    Thanks for share this.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by m85476585 View Post
    Is theft of bikes secured with weaker U-locks really a problem? What kind of attack does it take to break one (jack or angle grinder, I guess), and are any thieves really using those tools? What does a good u-lock do for you that a cheap one doesn't, besides buy a few more seconds as someone tries to break it?

    I have an Onguard Bulldog, and I've never worried about it even a little, and I've never heard of bikes with U-locks getting stolen except in theory.
    I don't know the full range of tools the thieves would use. Angle grinders and jacks have been reported. If I were a thief, I'd consider an oxy-acetylene torch, nothing stands up to 6000F for long. The high-end locks use specially-hardened steel, generally use a double-deadbolt design so cutting the shackle in just one place won't free the bike, and have thicker shackles (16mm for the New York, 18mm for the Faghedaboudit) and may have double-walled crossbars too.

    At a minimum, I'd go with a Kryptonite Evolution Series 4, which is double-deadbolt, comes with three keys (nice if you lose one, you're not down to your last chance), and is good enough to get a SoldSecure gold rating and a three-star ART rating. It's also a distinctive appearance (orange crossbar) that if I were the thief, I'd know on sight that it's not a Walmart junk lock, move along now

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post

    At a minimum, I'd go with a Kryptonite Evolution Series 4, which is double-deadbolt, comes with three keys (nice if you lose one, you're not down to your last chance), and is good enough to get a SoldSecure gold rating and a three-star ART rating. It's also a distinctive appearance (orange crossbar) that if I were the thief, I'd know on sight that it's not a Walmart junk lock, move along now
    Watch out for the Kryptonite Evolution locks with orange cross bar because not all of them have double deadbolt design. I bought the Evolution Mini LS, 3"x 9" shackle opening rather than 4"x9", and it only locks on one side; the non-locking side has a bent-foot.

    I ended up getting the Kryptonite NY Standard lock which has 4x8 shackle and double deadbolts, but honestly, that thing is so heavy that sometimes I don't even want to carry it around. I've left my bike outside cafes while watching it carefully and sometimes I come across some shops that are nice enough to let me put my bike in back. Eg some have an outdoor/yard/garden behind them.

    Is there any space inside the library where you might be able to stow the bike?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jseko View Post
    Watch out for the Kryptonite Evolution locks with orange cross bar because not all of them have double deadbolt design. I bought the Evolution Mini LS, 3"x 9" shackle opening rather than 4"x9", and it only locks on one side; the non-locking side has a bent-foot.
    Yeah, which is why I specified the Evolution Series 4 in particular. I wish they'd make the Series 4 in all the different formats (mini, long-shackle mini, long-shackle standard, and standard length/width). The one I use now is the last of those, the standard one, which fits a 4" pole plus rear wheel and both seatstays or chainstays.

    At the grocery store, I lassoo my front wheel with a cable and put the free end through my helmet and onto the U-lock... not the ultimate in security, but at least the bike's not there for long, and not on a predictable timetable, so I live with that risk. My seat and post have a light "seat leash" cable, which would be easy to cut with a small diagonal cutter, but prevents opportunistic walk-away theft.

    I work at a bike shop, so parking at work's a non-issue If I had to leave my bike outside work all day, I'd definitely step up the main lock and try to find a good place to use the two-locks, two-poles method. Hopefully I could leave the main lock there, so I wouldn't have to lug it around... I used to have a long-shackle version of the Faghedaboudit, aimed at the motorcycle market, which weighed about 7 1/2 pounds and was Not Fun To Lug


  15. #15
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    I thought Evolution Series 4 referred to all the locks with orange bar.

    Usually I stick the lock where the seat stays and rim intersect, but I have disc brakes. I'm not sure if it will work with rim brakes.

  16. #16
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    The Series 4 are the ones with the oval crossbar, which makes room for the double-deadbolt setup.

  17. #17
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    mechBgon nice lock job.

    I live in SF and regularly have to lock up in one of the worst places in the city for theft (The Metreon). The agreed upon standard around here is exactly how you lock up. Good U lock, chain and secure the seat. Only common difference is most of us use an old chain jacketed with an old tube to secure our seats.

    I also agree on the method of lock up better than the guy next to you. Thieves are opportunistic like most predators. I have seen plenty of people cry about lost bikes only to find out they were poorly locked.

    If possible, consider locking up in a near by place that is convenient and more secure. I like to try to find places where there is some one like a door man, or a security guard. I go chat with him and ask if can lock up and if some one will be around. Never forget your friends in low places.

    Lastly renters insurance starts at about $15 per month and covers bike theft. Worth every penny if you have a bunch of bikes in your garage.

    Just my $0.02

  18. #18
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    Your best bet is to just ask your boss if you can store your pick inside somewhere. I would still but a lock on it just in case there are some scummy co workers around but thats what I have done with my work. I throw mine in the store room off the kitchen.

  19. #19
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    I live in downtown Atlanta for school and my bike was stolen my first week here. The main thing is DO NOT rely on just a cable lock. I didn't think it was a big issue and the cable lock I had locked pretty beefy at that. Ya... gone in a couple days. I now park my bike behind my dorm instead of right out front right next to a main road and I also use a U lock. Nearly all bike thefts around here are because of cable locks.
    The bike I had stolen was a walmart mtb that I had for for years, but still it was in great condition and was much more convenient then my 1980s nishiki I'm riding now while my trek is at home safe.

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