Pain in my quads and tingly hands. Little help please.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Pain in my quads and tingly hands. Little help please.

    I just started commuting to work. Its 9 miles each way. I was using it as a method to save gas, let my girlfriend use our one car and get in shape. I used to mountain bike, but never on road and especially not 18 miles a day. I have only ridden to work 5 times now, and I am willing to bet this is just some pain since I am not used to this amount of riding, I just want to make sure if there is something wrong, I correct it asap.

    My question is I am having some pain in my quads, not knee, just the thigh muscle. It hurts when I lift my leg to walk up stairs. Not unbearable, but certainly not comfortable. I also have some tingling in my hands while riding. I have put on comfort grips with the wide soft spot towards the end of the bar.

    Now I dont have any money to upgrade parts, or buy a whole new bike together, so I am wondering if this is normal for starting out, or maybe I am headed towards some issues.

    I am riding an Ironhorse mountain bike, with Serfas City Drifter Tires. Any tips or thoughts would bea huge help. Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Quad issues could be just breaking in the unused muscles... but both issues could be related to seat and/or bar position. You want your knee just short of fully extended when your pedal is at the bottom of the stroke, and you want to find a compromise between too much weight on your hands and not enough. If your bars are too high, your hands won't be tingly but you're exposed to the wind more and you have more weight on your butt. If your bars are too low, you will have more weight on your hands (resulting in potential tingly-ness), but you're out of the wind a bit more. If you have sore quads and tingly hands, I'd try raising the seat a little bit, and maybe raising the bars too...consider a taller stem, bar ends or bars that give you more hand positions so that you can at least move to a new position when you get tingly. Sometimes it just happens...there's no cure-all for tingly hands. I get them and I've tried several different set-up options and different types of bars. What you can do it minimize it as much as possible with positioning and set-up.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  3. #3
    a lazy pedaler
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    my 2 cents...

    I used to mountain bike
    I think is normal that you feel some pain if you have not been cycling for a while...I was in that position a year ago, and yes my leg were in pain for a while...you will get your muscles in shape quickly.

    I have put on comfort grips

    well I did that a few week ago...I felt my hand kind of tingling too...you need to get use to riding again I think.

    check your position in the bike though..seat height etc.

  4. #4
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    Ya. I am hoping this is all just me getting used to riding so much,. I just wanted to make sure there weren't any red flags to my issues. Ill play around with my set up and see if things feel better.

    thanks

  5. #5
    AZ
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    This will help get you close .

    bicycletutor.com/adjust-seat -

  6. #6
    I got nothin'
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    These are all good suggestions. I assume that you are using a flat or low rise bar also. One thing you can do is add bar ends so you can get more hand positions. I know when I was riding my MTB for commuting I would also get some pain in my hands from the lack of different hand positions. I partially solved it by adding bar ends then also adjusting the bar height upwards to take weight off my hands. You can always bend down a bit when flying down hill to gain aero advantage. But if your in Phoenix you don't really have hills to worry about.
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  7. #7
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    AZnewbie, I would recommend picking up some milled flax seeds. Sprinkle some on your cereal, salad or in your sandwich. They are tasty and have lignans which will help with the muscle soreness as well as help repair the torn muscle fiber faster. You definitely want to get them milled though, because whole seeds will be harder to digest and the flax seed oil alone has the omega-3 benefit but not the lignans for your muscles.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  8. #8
    jrm
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    Ok

    start stretching your legs and bend your arms at the elbow.

  9. #9
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    Are you commuting 5 days a week? That's a lot of riding if your body isn't used to it. Maybe your body needs some rest days while you are starting out, ride mon, wed, and fri for a couple weeks before going all 5.

    The hands though, that's likely too much pressure on them. Mentally focus on keeping your back posture straight and not slouching, use your core to help hold some weight off your hands. Also as has been said before, raise bars or do other things to give more hand positions.

  10. #10
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    I concur that the legs sound mostly like disuse but the seat height and set back need to be checked, just in case. The linked site is excellent.

    Fit, fit, fit. It will change as you become used to it and as you age,even in spring compared to previous fall if you don't ride through winter.

    For some, the main nerve for the hands is pretty close to the surface in the dip at the base of the palm. Some find that grips or padded bar tape help, others find they make it worse. I had to take my bars higher than the seat and bring them 2 inches closer with a new stem and use padded gloves. Doesn't sound like that's an option for you for a while.

    Use many bar positions particulary if some let you lean back off the hands awhile, shaking a hand out and flexing fingers while on a section where one hand's enough, riding with fingergrip where that is safe: variety. Get out of the saddle more if you are almost entirely sitting.

    I spent a few dollars on good solid middle of the line padded bike gloves some of the best money I have spent. Shoes second. Saddle third.

  11. #11
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    Thanks so much guys. I have two days off now and ill be fine tuning the bike. I think I will adjust the seat height, and maybe find some cheap bar ends. I have no pain other than really climbing stairs, and some soreness while riding so I am not too worried about it.

    I am commuting 5 days a week right now. I will continue to do so and just ride a little easier when I am tired.

  12. #12
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    Also Gary TNTC, Ill definetly go out and get some of those seeds tomorrow and try them out. I have made a big effort to fix my eating habits, and I am always looking for something new to help

  13. #13
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    You've received some good advice ITT. I would also ensure your wrists are straight and not bent.

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